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Role of Chemokines in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Angiogenesis and Inflammation.

Rivas-Fuentes S, Salgado-Aguayo A, Pertuz Belloso S, Gorocica Rosete P, Alvarado-Vásquez N, Aquino-Jarquin G - J Cancer (2015)

Bottom Line: Chemokines are important in development, activation of the immune response, and physiological angiogenesis.Chemokines have emerged as important regulators in the pathophysiology of cancer.The findings summarized here emphasize the central role of chemokines as modulators of tumor angiogenesis and their potential role as therapeutic targets in the inflammatory process of NSCLC angiogenesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1. Department of Biochemistry Research, National Institute of Respiratory Diseases "Ismael Cosío Villegas", Mexico City, Mexico.

ABSTRACT
Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the most common types of aggressive cancer. The tumor tissue, which shows an active angiogenesis, is composed of neoplastic and stromal cells, and an abundant inflammatory infiltrate. Angiogenesis is important to support tumor growth, while infiltrating cells contribute to the tumor microenvironment through the secretion of growth factors, cytokines and chemokines, important molecules in the progression of the disease. Chemokines are important in development, activation of the immune response, and physiological angiogenesis. Chemokines have emerged as important regulators in the pathophysiology of cancer. These molecules are involved in the angiogenesis/angiostasis balance and in the recruitment of tumor infiltrating hematopoietic cells. In addition, chemokines promote tumor cell survival, as well as the directing and establishment of tumor cells to metastasis sites. The findings summarized here emphasize the central role of chemokines as modulators of tumor angiogenesis and their potential role as therapeutic targets in the inflammatory process of NSCLC angiogenesis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Chemokine ligand/receptor axis involved in the pathophysiology of NSCLC. The pathophysiology of NSCLC involves several processes, including tumor growth, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, recruitment of immune cells, invasion, metastasis, and occasionally antitumoral immune response. The figure shows the main Chemokine ligand/receptor axes involved in these processes.
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Figure 1: Chemokine ligand/receptor axis involved in the pathophysiology of NSCLC. The pathophysiology of NSCLC involves several processes, including tumor growth, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, recruitment of immune cells, invasion, metastasis, and occasionally antitumoral immune response. The figure shows the main Chemokine ligand/receptor axes involved in these processes.

Mentions: In cancer, the involvement of chemokines and their receptors comprises several aspects. First, chemokines regulate, through the activation of endothelial cells, the angiogenesis that supports tumor growth. Furthermore, chemokines and their receptors contribute actively to the formation of the tumor microenvironment through the recruitment of infiltrating tumor cells such as tumor-associated macrophages. Infiltrating tumor cells change the tumor microenvironment by secreting cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and other effector proteins (Figure 1). These molecules also contribute to the recruitment of other cell types, such as regulatory T cells, and are also important in the recruitment of TAN, which can contribute to genomic instability, thereby promoting the process of carcinogenesis. Moreover, it has been shown that many chemokines have direct effects on tumor cells and are able to regulate their proliferation, survival and migration. The role of angiogenesis in solid tumor growth has attracted a great deal of attention as a potential therapeutic target. Lung cancer is the main cancer-related cause of death worldwide in both men and women. Although much is still unknown about the role of chemokines in NSCLC, the evidence shown here indicates that these molecules and their receptors play a major role in the pathophysiology of this disease. Additional studies that examine the role of specific chemokine/receptor axes at different stages of lung cancer would be of great importance to understand the role of these molecules in the course of the disease and to establish the differences in the activation of chemokine receptors through different ligands.


Role of Chemokines in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Angiogenesis and Inflammation.

Rivas-Fuentes S, Salgado-Aguayo A, Pertuz Belloso S, Gorocica Rosete P, Alvarado-Vásquez N, Aquino-Jarquin G - J Cancer (2015)

Chemokine ligand/receptor axis involved in the pathophysiology of NSCLC. The pathophysiology of NSCLC involves several processes, including tumor growth, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, recruitment of immune cells, invasion, metastasis, and occasionally antitumoral immune response. The figure shows the main Chemokine ligand/receptor axes involved in these processes.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4543754&req=5

Figure 1: Chemokine ligand/receptor axis involved in the pathophysiology of NSCLC. The pathophysiology of NSCLC involves several processes, including tumor growth, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, recruitment of immune cells, invasion, metastasis, and occasionally antitumoral immune response. The figure shows the main Chemokine ligand/receptor axes involved in these processes.
Mentions: In cancer, the involvement of chemokines and their receptors comprises several aspects. First, chemokines regulate, through the activation of endothelial cells, the angiogenesis that supports tumor growth. Furthermore, chemokines and their receptors contribute actively to the formation of the tumor microenvironment through the recruitment of infiltrating tumor cells such as tumor-associated macrophages. Infiltrating tumor cells change the tumor microenvironment by secreting cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and other effector proteins (Figure 1). These molecules also contribute to the recruitment of other cell types, such as regulatory T cells, and are also important in the recruitment of TAN, which can contribute to genomic instability, thereby promoting the process of carcinogenesis. Moreover, it has been shown that many chemokines have direct effects on tumor cells and are able to regulate their proliferation, survival and migration. The role of angiogenesis in solid tumor growth has attracted a great deal of attention as a potential therapeutic target. Lung cancer is the main cancer-related cause of death worldwide in both men and women. Although much is still unknown about the role of chemokines in NSCLC, the evidence shown here indicates that these molecules and their receptors play a major role in the pathophysiology of this disease. Additional studies that examine the role of specific chemokine/receptor axes at different stages of lung cancer would be of great importance to understand the role of these molecules in the course of the disease and to establish the differences in the activation of chemokine receptors through different ligands.

Bottom Line: Chemokines are important in development, activation of the immune response, and physiological angiogenesis.Chemokines have emerged as important regulators in the pathophysiology of cancer.The findings summarized here emphasize the central role of chemokines as modulators of tumor angiogenesis and their potential role as therapeutic targets in the inflammatory process of NSCLC angiogenesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1. Department of Biochemistry Research, National Institute of Respiratory Diseases "Ismael Cosío Villegas", Mexico City, Mexico.

ABSTRACT
Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the most common types of aggressive cancer. The tumor tissue, which shows an active angiogenesis, is composed of neoplastic and stromal cells, and an abundant inflammatory infiltrate. Angiogenesis is important to support tumor growth, while infiltrating cells contribute to the tumor microenvironment through the secretion of growth factors, cytokines and chemokines, important molecules in the progression of the disease. Chemokines are important in development, activation of the immune response, and physiological angiogenesis. Chemokines have emerged as important regulators in the pathophysiology of cancer. These molecules are involved in the angiogenesis/angiostasis balance and in the recruitment of tumor infiltrating hematopoietic cells. In addition, chemokines promote tumor cell survival, as well as the directing and establishment of tumor cells to metastasis sites. The findings summarized here emphasize the central role of chemokines as modulators of tumor angiogenesis and their potential role as therapeutic targets in the inflammatory process of NSCLC angiogenesis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus