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Inheritance of low pasting temperature in sweetpotato starch and the dosage effect of wild-type alleles.

Katayama K, Tamiya S, Sakai T, Kai Y, Ohara-Takada A, Kuranouchi T, Yoshinaga M - Breed. Sci. (2015)

Bottom Line: The results from analyzing these progenies suggested that this trait is a qualitative character controlled by one recessive allele (designated spt), which is inherited in a hexasomic manner.A dosage effect of the wild-type Spt allele was found for starch pasting temperature, although the effect was not linear.These results will aid breeders to develop sweetpotato cultivars with a range of starch pasting temperatures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: NARO Institute of Crop Science , 2-1-18 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8518 , Japan ; NARO Kyushu Okinawa Agricultural Research Center , 6651-2 Yokoichi, Miyakonojo, Miyazaki 885-0091 , Japan.

ABSTRACT
Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.), which is an outcrossing hexaploid, is one of the most important starch-producing crops in the world. During the last decade, new sweetpotato cultivars, e.g. 'Quick Sweet', which have approximately 20°C lower pasting temperature, slower retrogradation and higher digestibility of raw starch than ordinary cultivars, have been developed in Japan. Genetic analysis of these variants with low pasting temperature starch was conducted in this study. Using 8 variants and 15 normal clones, 26 families were generated. The results from analyzing these progenies suggested that this trait is a qualitative character controlled by one recessive allele (designated spt), which is inherited in a hexasomic manner. A dosage effect of the wild-type Spt allele was found for starch pasting temperature, although the effect was not linear. These results will aid breeders to develop sweetpotato cultivars with a range of starch pasting temperatures.

No MeSH data available.


The frequency distributions of starch pasting temperatures in the F1 progenies of five families. Arrows show the pasting temperatures of the parental lines. A: 99L04-13 × Quick Sweet, B: Kyukei97230-5 × Quick Sweet, C: Quick Sweet × Miyano No. 36, D: Quick Sweet × Daichinoyume, E: Quick Sweet × Koganesengan.
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f1-65_352: The frequency distributions of starch pasting temperatures in the F1 progenies of five families. Arrows show the pasting temperatures of the parental lines. A: 99L04-13 × Quick Sweet, B: Kyukei97230-5 × Quick Sweet, C: Quick Sweet × Miyano No. 36, D: Quick Sweet × Daichinoyume, E: Quick Sweet × Koganesengan.

Mentions: Fig. 1 shows the frequency distributions of starch pasting temperatures in 257 seedlings from five families analyzed using the RVA. The pasting temperatures of progenies ranged from 53.0 to 77.0°C. These progenies could be broadly classified into two groups. The first group had low pasting temperature ranging from 53.0 to 64.0°C, and the second group had normal pasting temperature ranging from 63.0 to 77.0°C. We decided that the low pasting temperature variants and normal clones of the progenies were classified by a break in the distribution of pasting temperature between 63.0 and 64.0°C. These five families differed in the ratios of segregation. Both ‘Quick Sweet’ and ‘99L04-13’ had low pasting temperature, and all of their F1 progenies had low pasting temperature (Fig. 1A). The other crosses between ‘Quick Sweet’ and normal clones had two groups of progenies, or all normal progenies (Fig. 1B–1E). The progenies from the cross between ‘Kyukei97230-5’ and ‘Quick Sweet’ segregated at 26:27 for the normal and variant groups (Fig. 1B). The ratio of segregants between ‘Quick Sweet’ and ‘Miyano No. 36’ was 39:9 (Fig. 1C), between ‘Quick Sweet’ and ‘Daichinoyume’ it was 60:4 (Fig. 1D), and that between ‘Quick Sweet’ and ‘Koganesengan’ was 65:0 (Fig. 1E), for normal and variants groups, respectively.


Inheritance of low pasting temperature in sweetpotato starch and the dosage effect of wild-type alleles.

Katayama K, Tamiya S, Sakai T, Kai Y, Ohara-Takada A, Kuranouchi T, Yoshinaga M - Breed. Sci. (2015)

The frequency distributions of starch pasting temperatures in the F1 progenies of five families. Arrows show the pasting temperatures of the parental lines. A: 99L04-13 × Quick Sweet, B: Kyukei97230-5 × Quick Sweet, C: Quick Sweet × Miyano No. 36, D: Quick Sweet × Daichinoyume, E: Quick Sweet × Koganesengan.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4542937&req=5

f1-65_352: The frequency distributions of starch pasting temperatures in the F1 progenies of five families. Arrows show the pasting temperatures of the parental lines. A: 99L04-13 × Quick Sweet, B: Kyukei97230-5 × Quick Sweet, C: Quick Sweet × Miyano No. 36, D: Quick Sweet × Daichinoyume, E: Quick Sweet × Koganesengan.
Mentions: Fig. 1 shows the frequency distributions of starch pasting temperatures in 257 seedlings from five families analyzed using the RVA. The pasting temperatures of progenies ranged from 53.0 to 77.0°C. These progenies could be broadly classified into two groups. The first group had low pasting temperature ranging from 53.0 to 64.0°C, and the second group had normal pasting temperature ranging from 63.0 to 77.0°C. We decided that the low pasting temperature variants and normal clones of the progenies were classified by a break in the distribution of pasting temperature between 63.0 and 64.0°C. These five families differed in the ratios of segregation. Both ‘Quick Sweet’ and ‘99L04-13’ had low pasting temperature, and all of their F1 progenies had low pasting temperature (Fig. 1A). The other crosses between ‘Quick Sweet’ and normal clones had two groups of progenies, or all normal progenies (Fig. 1B–1E). The progenies from the cross between ‘Kyukei97230-5’ and ‘Quick Sweet’ segregated at 26:27 for the normal and variant groups (Fig. 1B). The ratio of segregants between ‘Quick Sweet’ and ‘Miyano No. 36’ was 39:9 (Fig. 1C), between ‘Quick Sweet’ and ‘Daichinoyume’ it was 60:4 (Fig. 1D), and that between ‘Quick Sweet’ and ‘Koganesengan’ was 65:0 (Fig. 1E), for normal and variants groups, respectively.

Bottom Line: The results from analyzing these progenies suggested that this trait is a qualitative character controlled by one recessive allele (designated spt), which is inherited in a hexasomic manner.A dosage effect of the wild-type Spt allele was found for starch pasting temperature, although the effect was not linear.These results will aid breeders to develop sweetpotato cultivars with a range of starch pasting temperatures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: NARO Institute of Crop Science , 2-1-18 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8518 , Japan ; NARO Kyushu Okinawa Agricultural Research Center , 6651-2 Yokoichi, Miyakonojo, Miyazaki 885-0091 , Japan.

ABSTRACT
Sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.), which is an outcrossing hexaploid, is one of the most important starch-producing crops in the world. During the last decade, new sweetpotato cultivars, e.g. 'Quick Sweet', which have approximately 20°C lower pasting temperature, slower retrogradation and higher digestibility of raw starch than ordinary cultivars, have been developed in Japan. Genetic analysis of these variants with low pasting temperature starch was conducted in this study. Using 8 variants and 15 normal clones, 26 families were generated. The results from analyzing these progenies suggested that this trait is a qualitative character controlled by one recessive allele (designated spt), which is inherited in a hexasomic manner. A dosage effect of the wild-type Spt allele was found for starch pasting temperature, although the effect was not linear. These results will aid breeders to develop sweetpotato cultivars with a range of starch pasting temperatures.

No MeSH data available.