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Discerning the differential molecular pathology of proliferative middle ear lesions using Raman spectroscopy.

Pandey R, Paidi SK, Kang JW, Spegazzini N, Dasari RR, Valdez TA, Barman I - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Despite its widespread prevalence, middle ear pathology, especially the development of proliferative lesions, remains largely unexplored and poorly understood.Diagnostic evaluation is still predicated upon a high index of clinical suspicion on otoscopic examination of gross morphologic features.In addition to revealing signatures consistent with the known pathobiology of these lesions, our observations provide the first evidence of the presence of carbonate- and silicate-substitutions in the calcium phosphate plaques found in myringosclerosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laser Biomedical Research Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 02139, USA.

ABSTRACT
Despite its widespread prevalence, middle ear pathology, especially the development of proliferative lesions, remains largely unexplored and poorly understood. Diagnostic evaluation is still predicated upon a high index of clinical suspicion on otoscopic examination of gross morphologic features. We report the first technique that has the potential to non-invasively identify two key lesions, namely cholesteatoma and myringosclerosis, by providing real-time information of differentially expressed molecules. In addition to revealing signatures consistent with the known pathobiology of these lesions, our observations provide the first evidence of the presence of carbonate- and silicate-substitutions in the calcium phosphate plaques found in myringosclerosis. Collectively, these results demonstrate the potential of Raman spectroscopy to not only provide new understanding of the etiology of these conditions by defining objective molecular markers but also aid in margin assessment to improve surgical outcome.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Illustration of principal component loadings for:(A) cholesteatoma lesion sites, (B) myringosclerosis sites that exhibit mineralization and (C) myringosclerosis with no appreciable mineralized clusters. Evidently, the PC loadings indicate the stark contrast in the underlying biochemistry between the different tissue pathologies. (D) Raman spectrum acquired from pure stoichiometric calcium hydroxyapatite for comparison.
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f3: Illustration of principal component loadings for:(A) cholesteatoma lesion sites, (B) myringosclerosis sites that exhibit mineralization and (C) myringosclerosis with no appreciable mineralized clusters. Evidently, the PC loadings indicate the stark contrast in the underlying biochemistry between the different tissue pathologies. (D) Raman spectrum acquired from pure stoichiometric calcium hydroxyapatite for comparison.

Mentions: Here we employed PCA to reduce the dimensionality of the spectral data into a few critical components that explain most of the data variance and to help identify “spectral markers” that can reliably discern the tissue pathology. Figure 3 shows the first 7 PCs for each of these three tissue types (cholesteatoma, biomineralized sites of myringosclerosis and uninvolved sites of myringosclerosis lesions) with the inset highlighting the Raman scattering features in the pertinent PC loadings. The broad autofluorescence background provides a significant contribution to the first few PCs, for each tissue type, despite the use of the NIR excitation source. While we have previously shown that the appropriate use of chemometric methods can aid in decoupling the autofluorescence signal from the Raman features of interest15, the shot noise associated with the autofluorescence background in the visible region can significantly impede the classification accuracy thereby highlighting the importance of working in the “tissue-transparent” NIR window.


Discerning the differential molecular pathology of proliferative middle ear lesions using Raman spectroscopy.

Pandey R, Paidi SK, Kang JW, Spegazzini N, Dasari RR, Valdez TA, Barman I - Sci Rep (2015)

Illustration of principal component loadings for:(A) cholesteatoma lesion sites, (B) myringosclerosis sites that exhibit mineralization and (C) myringosclerosis with no appreciable mineralized clusters. Evidently, the PC loadings indicate the stark contrast in the underlying biochemistry between the different tissue pathologies. (D) Raman spectrum acquired from pure stoichiometric calcium hydroxyapatite for comparison.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4542608&req=5

f3: Illustration of principal component loadings for:(A) cholesteatoma lesion sites, (B) myringosclerosis sites that exhibit mineralization and (C) myringosclerosis with no appreciable mineralized clusters. Evidently, the PC loadings indicate the stark contrast in the underlying biochemistry between the different tissue pathologies. (D) Raman spectrum acquired from pure stoichiometric calcium hydroxyapatite for comparison.
Mentions: Here we employed PCA to reduce the dimensionality of the spectral data into a few critical components that explain most of the data variance and to help identify “spectral markers” that can reliably discern the tissue pathology. Figure 3 shows the first 7 PCs for each of these three tissue types (cholesteatoma, biomineralized sites of myringosclerosis and uninvolved sites of myringosclerosis lesions) with the inset highlighting the Raman scattering features in the pertinent PC loadings. The broad autofluorescence background provides a significant contribution to the first few PCs, for each tissue type, despite the use of the NIR excitation source. While we have previously shown that the appropriate use of chemometric methods can aid in decoupling the autofluorescence signal from the Raman features of interest15, the shot noise associated with the autofluorescence background in the visible region can significantly impede the classification accuracy thereby highlighting the importance of working in the “tissue-transparent” NIR window.

Bottom Line: Despite its widespread prevalence, middle ear pathology, especially the development of proliferative lesions, remains largely unexplored and poorly understood.Diagnostic evaluation is still predicated upon a high index of clinical suspicion on otoscopic examination of gross morphologic features.In addition to revealing signatures consistent with the known pathobiology of these lesions, our observations provide the first evidence of the presence of carbonate- and silicate-substitutions in the calcium phosphate plaques found in myringosclerosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laser Biomedical Research Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 02139, USA.

ABSTRACT
Despite its widespread prevalence, middle ear pathology, especially the development of proliferative lesions, remains largely unexplored and poorly understood. Diagnostic evaluation is still predicated upon a high index of clinical suspicion on otoscopic examination of gross morphologic features. We report the first technique that has the potential to non-invasively identify two key lesions, namely cholesteatoma and myringosclerosis, by providing real-time information of differentially expressed molecules. In addition to revealing signatures consistent with the known pathobiology of these lesions, our observations provide the first evidence of the presence of carbonate- and silicate-substitutions in the calcium phosphate plaques found in myringosclerosis. Collectively, these results demonstrate the potential of Raman spectroscopy to not only provide new understanding of the etiology of these conditions by defining objective molecular markers but also aid in margin assessment to improve surgical outcome.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus