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Discerning the differential molecular pathology of proliferative middle ear lesions using Raman spectroscopy.

Pandey R, Paidi SK, Kang JW, Spegazzini N, Dasari RR, Valdez TA, Barman I - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Despite its widespread prevalence, middle ear pathology, especially the development of proliferative lesions, remains largely unexplored and poorly understood.Diagnostic evaluation is still predicated upon a high index of clinical suspicion on otoscopic examination of gross morphologic features.In addition to revealing signatures consistent with the known pathobiology of these lesions, our observations provide the first evidence of the presence of carbonate- and silicate-substitutions in the calcium phosphate plaques found in myringosclerosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laser Biomedical Research Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 02139, USA.

ABSTRACT
Despite its widespread prevalence, middle ear pathology, especially the development of proliferative lesions, remains largely unexplored and poorly understood. Diagnostic evaluation is still predicated upon a high index of clinical suspicion on otoscopic examination of gross morphologic features. We report the first technique that has the potential to non-invasively identify two key lesions, namely cholesteatoma and myringosclerosis, by providing real-time information of differentially expressed molecules. In addition to revealing signatures consistent with the known pathobiology of these lesions, our observations provide the first evidence of the presence of carbonate- and silicate-substitutions in the calcium phosphate plaques found in myringosclerosis. Collectively, these results demonstrate the potential of Raman spectroscopy to not only provide new understanding of the etiology of these conditions by defining objective molecular markers but also aid in margin assessment to improve surgical outcome.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Representative white light images of (A) cholesteatoma and (B) myringosclerosis in situ prior to surgical excision of the lesions.
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f1: Representative white light images of (A) cholesteatoma and (B) myringosclerosis in situ prior to surgical excision of the lesions.

Mentions: Figure 1 shows representative white light images of a cholesteatoma and a myringosclerosis lesion in situ before surgical excision. Figure 2 shows representative Raman spectra acquired from clinical tissue specimens post resection. The specificity of Raman spectroscopy in detecting molecular phenotypes of tissue reveals clear differences in the spectral signatures between the cholesteatoma lesions and some of the myringosclerosis sites. This is consistent with the medical consensus on these two pathological conditions, where the former is characterized by intrusions of keratinizing stratified squamous epithelium supported underneath by loose connective tissue (constituted largely by collagen and elastin) while the latter is comprised of calcified plaques amidst collagen deposits. Since the myringosclerosis lesions display significant heterogeneity in the spatial distribution of the calcified structures, treating the acquired spectral set from such tissue specimen as a homogeneous bucket would provide an inaccurate representation. Thus, based on the differences within the myringosclerosis set (particularly in the well-characterized Raman feature at 960 cm−1), we separated the mineralized sites (Fig. 2(B)) from the grossly uninvolved tissue (Fig. 2(C)) using peak identification code over a 20 cm−1 band centered at this feature. It is worth noting that the datasets show a measure of overlap that can be attributed to a continuous pathology model from uninvolved tissue to a site with high concentration of calcified structures. The differences, if any, between the cholesteatoma samples and the non-mineralized myringosclerosis set are more subtle and within-class variations in the spectral dataset impede the possibility of elucidating such differences by single-feature analysis alone.


Discerning the differential molecular pathology of proliferative middle ear lesions using Raman spectroscopy.

Pandey R, Paidi SK, Kang JW, Spegazzini N, Dasari RR, Valdez TA, Barman I - Sci Rep (2015)

Representative white light images of (A) cholesteatoma and (B) myringosclerosis in situ prior to surgical excision of the lesions.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4542608&req=5

f1: Representative white light images of (A) cholesteatoma and (B) myringosclerosis in situ prior to surgical excision of the lesions.
Mentions: Figure 1 shows representative white light images of a cholesteatoma and a myringosclerosis lesion in situ before surgical excision. Figure 2 shows representative Raman spectra acquired from clinical tissue specimens post resection. The specificity of Raman spectroscopy in detecting molecular phenotypes of tissue reveals clear differences in the spectral signatures between the cholesteatoma lesions and some of the myringosclerosis sites. This is consistent with the medical consensus on these two pathological conditions, where the former is characterized by intrusions of keratinizing stratified squamous epithelium supported underneath by loose connective tissue (constituted largely by collagen and elastin) while the latter is comprised of calcified plaques amidst collagen deposits. Since the myringosclerosis lesions display significant heterogeneity in the spatial distribution of the calcified structures, treating the acquired spectral set from such tissue specimen as a homogeneous bucket would provide an inaccurate representation. Thus, based on the differences within the myringosclerosis set (particularly in the well-characterized Raman feature at 960 cm−1), we separated the mineralized sites (Fig. 2(B)) from the grossly uninvolved tissue (Fig. 2(C)) using peak identification code over a 20 cm−1 band centered at this feature. It is worth noting that the datasets show a measure of overlap that can be attributed to a continuous pathology model from uninvolved tissue to a site with high concentration of calcified structures. The differences, if any, between the cholesteatoma samples and the non-mineralized myringosclerosis set are more subtle and within-class variations in the spectral dataset impede the possibility of elucidating such differences by single-feature analysis alone.

Bottom Line: Despite its widespread prevalence, middle ear pathology, especially the development of proliferative lesions, remains largely unexplored and poorly understood.Diagnostic evaluation is still predicated upon a high index of clinical suspicion on otoscopic examination of gross morphologic features.In addition to revealing signatures consistent with the known pathobiology of these lesions, our observations provide the first evidence of the presence of carbonate- and silicate-substitutions in the calcium phosphate plaques found in myringosclerosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laser Biomedical Research Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 02139, USA.

ABSTRACT
Despite its widespread prevalence, middle ear pathology, especially the development of proliferative lesions, remains largely unexplored and poorly understood. Diagnostic evaluation is still predicated upon a high index of clinical suspicion on otoscopic examination of gross morphologic features. We report the first technique that has the potential to non-invasively identify two key lesions, namely cholesteatoma and myringosclerosis, by providing real-time information of differentially expressed molecules. In addition to revealing signatures consistent with the known pathobiology of these lesions, our observations provide the first evidence of the presence of carbonate- and silicate-substitutions in the calcium phosphate plaques found in myringosclerosis. Collectively, these results demonstrate the potential of Raman spectroscopy to not only provide new understanding of the etiology of these conditions by defining objective molecular markers but also aid in margin assessment to improve surgical outcome.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus