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Reliability and criterion-related validity of the 20-yard shuttle test in competitive junior tennis players.

Eriksson A, Johansson FR, Bäck M - Open Access J Sports Med (2015)

Bottom Line: The time recorded manually was compared to the gold standard of digital timing to evaluate the criterion-related validity.Excellent test-retest reliability was found both within the same day (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] 0.95) and between days (ICC 0.91).Furthermore, the results showed excellent inter-rater reliability (ICC 0.99) and criterion-related validity on both test occasions (ICC 0.99).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Rehab City Östermalm, Primary Health Care, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This study adds to the previous work in the field of sport-specific fitness testing by evaluating a tennis-specific agility test called "the 20-yard shuttle test". The aim of the study was to evaluate the test-retest reliability, the inter-rater reliability, and the criterion-related validity of the 20-yard shuttle test on competitive junior tennis players.

Participants and methods: Totally, 34 Swedish tennis players (13 girls), mean age 14±1.6 years, participated in the study. To examine test-retest reliability, the subjects performed the 20-yard shuttle test three times on the same day and then the same procedure was repeated after 3 days. To test the inter-rater reliability, the time was measured with a stopwatch simultaneously by two different raters. The time recorded manually was compared to the gold standard of digital timing to evaluate the criterion-related validity.

Results: Excellent test-retest reliability was found both within the same day (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] 0.95) and between days (ICC 0.91). Furthermore, the results showed excellent inter-rater reliability (ICC 0.99) and criterion-related validity on both test occasions (ICC 0.99).

Conclusion: We have provided introductory support for the 20-yard shuttle test as a reliable and valid test for use in competitive junior tennis players. The ease of administration makes this test a practical alternative to evaluate physical fitness in order to optimally train the athletes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A schematic diagram of the 20-yard shuttle test.Note: The arrows indicates the distances that the subject is running at the given start command.
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f1-oajsm-6-269: A schematic diagram of the 20-yard shuttle test.Note: The arrows indicates the distances that the subject is running at the given start command.

Mentions: The test was set up in the following manner: Three marker cones were placed along a line 4.55 m apart. The players were instructed to straddle a marked tape (48 cm) behind the middle line, which served as the start/finish line (where the photoelectric barriers were placed), and put one hand down in a three-point stance. On hearing the command “ready, steady, go”, the subject started, and the raters started the stopwatches as soon as they crossed the start line. The subject turned and ran as fast as possible 4.55 m to the right side and touched one foot behind the line. The subject then ran 9.1 m to the left and touched one foot behind the other line and finally finished by running back through the finish line. When the subject crossed the line, the stopwatches, both manually and digitally, were stopped. The test is illustrated in Figure 1. The duration of each trial was recorded to the nearest 100th of a second. The photoelectric cell timer was automatically activated as the subject crossed the first cell and stopped when the subject crossed the last cell.


Reliability and criterion-related validity of the 20-yard shuttle test in competitive junior tennis players.

Eriksson A, Johansson FR, Bäck M - Open Access J Sports Med (2015)

A schematic diagram of the 20-yard shuttle test.Note: The arrows indicates the distances that the subject is running at the given start command.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4542558&req=5

f1-oajsm-6-269: A schematic diagram of the 20-yard shuttle test.Note: The arrows indicates the distances that the subject is running at the given start command.
Mentions: The test was set up in the following manner: Three marker cones were placed along a line 4.55 m apart. The players were instructed to straddle a marked tape (48 cm) behind the middle line, which served as the start/finish line (where the photoelectric barriers were placed), and put one hand down in a three-point stance. On hearing the command “ready, steady, go”, the subject started, and the raters started the stopwatches as soon as they crossed the start line. The subject turned and ran as fast as possible 4.55 m to the right side and touched one foot behind the line. The subject then ran 9.1 m to the left and touched one foot behind the other line and finally finished by running back through the finish line. When the subject crossed the line, the stopwatches, both manually and digitally, were stopped. The test is illustrated in Figure 1. The duration of each trial was recorded to the nearest 100th of a second. The photoelectric cell timer was automatically activated as the subject crossed the first cell and stopped when the subject crossed the last cell.

Bottom Line: The time recorded manually was compared to the gold standard of digital timing to evaluate the criterion-related validity.Excellent test-retest reliability was found both within the same day (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] 0.95) and between days (ICC 0.91).Furthermore, the results showed excellent inter-rater reliability (ICC 0.99) and criterion-related validity on both test occasions (ICC 0.99).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Rehab City Östermalm, Primary Health Care, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This study adds to the previous work in the field of sport-specific fitness testing by evaluating a tennis-specific agility test called "the 20-yard shuttle test". The aim of the study was to evaluate the test-retest reliability, the inter-rater reliability, and the criterion-related validity of the 20-yard shuttle test on competitive junior tennis players.

Participants and methods: Totally, 34 Swedish tennis players (13 girls), mean age 14±1.6 years, participated in the study. To examine test-retest reliability, the subjects performed the 20-yard shuttle test three times on the same day and then the same procedure was repeated after 3 days. To test the inter-rater reliability, the time was measured with a stopwatch simultaneously by two different raters. The time recorded manually was compared to the gold standard of digital timing to evaluate the criterion-related validity.

Results: Excellent test-retest reliability was found both within the same day (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] 0.95) and between days (ICC 0.91). Furthermore, the results showed excellent inter-rater reliability (ICC 0.99) and criterion-related validity on both test occasions (ICC 0.99).

Conclusion: We have provided introductory support for the 20-yard shuttle test as a reliable and valid test for use in competitive junior tennis players. The ease of administration makes this test a practical alternative to evaluate physical fitness in order to optimally train the athletes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus