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The effect of age on cognitive performance of frontal patients.

Cipolotti L, Healy C, Chan E, MacPherson SE, White M, Woollett K, Turner M, Robinson G, Spanò B, Bozzali M, Shallice T - Neuropsychologia (2015)

Bottom Line: We found that only age consistently predicted the exacerbated executive impairment.Our results are in line with the notion that the frontal cortex plays a critical role in aging to counteract cognitive and neuronal decline.We suggest that the combined effect of aging and frontal lesions impairs the frontal cortical systems by causing its computational power to fall below the threshold needed to complete executive tasks successfully.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuropsychology, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London, UK; Dipartimento di Psicologia, Università di Palermo, Italy. Electronic address: l.cipolotti@ucl.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentage of patients with lesions in specific frontal areas projected on a standardised MNI template. Legend: shading illustrate the percentage of patients with primary and secondary damage to lateral (right and left), medial and orbito frontal regions.
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f0015: Percentage of patients with lesions in specific frontal areas projected on a standardised MNI template. Legend: shading illustrate the percentage of patients with primary and secondary damage to lateral (right and left), medial and orbito frontal regions.

Mentions: T1-weigthed MRI or CT scans were available for 61 out of the 68 frontal patients. There was a significant difference in the number of patients with damage to the four main frontal areas (χ2=13.317, df=3 p=.004). There were significantly more patients with medial damage than patients with damage to left or right lateral areas (medial versus left lateral; χ2=11.849, df=1, p=.001, α=.0125; medial versus right lateral χ2=7.449, df=1, p=.006, α=.0125) and a non-significant trend for damage to the orbitofrontal area (medial versus orbitofrontal area χ2=5.638, df=1, p=.018, α=.0125). There was no difference in the number of patients with lesions in any of the other frontal areas (see Fig. 3).


The effect of age on cognitive performance of frontal patients.

Cipolotti L, Healy C, Chan E, MacPherson SE, White M, Woollett K, Turner M, Robinson G, Spanò B, Bozzali M, Shallice T - Neuropsychologia (2015)

Percentage of patients with lesions in specific frontal areas projected on a standardised MNI template. Legend: shading illustrate the percentage of patients with primary and secondary damage to lateral (right and left), medial and orbito frontal regions.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4542524&req=5

f0015: Percentage of patients with lesions in specific frontal areas projected on a standardised MNI template. Legend: shading illustrate the percentage of patients with primary and secondary damage to lateral (right and left), medial and orbito frontal regions.
Mentions: T1-weigthed MRI or CT scans were available for 61 out of the 68 frontal patients. There was a significant difference in the number of patients with damage to the four main frontal areas (χ2=13.317, df=3 p=.004). There were significantly more patients with medial damage than patients with damage to left or right lateral areas (medial versus left lateral; χ2=11.849, df=1, p=.001, α=.0125; medial versus right lateral χ2=7.449, df=1, p=.006, α=.0125) and a non-significant trend for damage to the orbitofrontal area (medial versus orbitofrontal area χ2=5.638, df=1, p=.018, α=.0125). There was no difference in the number of patients with lesions in any of the other frontal areas (see Fig. 3).

Bottom Line: We found that only age consistently predicted the exacerbated executive impairment.Our results are in line with the notion that the frontal cortex plays a critical role in aging to counteract cognitive and neuronal decline.We suggest that the combined effect of aging and frontal lesions impairs the frontal cortical systems by causing its computational power to fall below the threshold needed to complete executive tasks successfully.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuropsychology, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London, UK; Dipartimento di Psicologia, Università di Palermo, Italy. Electronic address: l.cipolotti@ucl.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus