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The effect of age on cognitive performance of frontal patients.

Cipolotti L, Healy C, Chan E, MacPherson SE, White M, Woollett K, Turner M, Robinson G, Spanò B, Bozzali M, Shallice T - Neuropsychologia (2015)

Bottom Line: We found that only age consistently predicted the exacerbated executive impairment.Our results are in line with the notion that the frontal cortex plays a critical role in aging to counteract cognitive and neuronal decline.We suggest that the combined effect of aging and frontal lesions impairs the frontal cortical systems by causing its computational power to fall below the threshold needed to complete executive tasks successfully.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuropsychology, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London, UK; Dipartimento di Psicologia, Università di Palermo, Italy. Electronic address: l.cipolotti@ucl.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Frontal patients' discrepancy score as a function of age and the corresponding regression lines for each neuropsychological test. Legend: ◊=frontal patients, −=frontal patients regression line. Discrepancy score is reported on the y-axis and represents differences in absolute value for each test. 0 represents no discrepancy between each patient's measured post-morbid score on cognitive tests compared with his/her estimated premorbid score. Larger negative values reflect greater decline in performance from premorbid estimates.
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f0005: Frontal patients' discrepancy score as a function of age and the corresponding regression lines for each neuropsychological test. Legend: ◊=frontal patients, −=frontal patients regression line. Discrepancy score is reported on the y-axis and represents differences in absolute value for each test. 0 represents no discrepancy between each patient's measured post-morbid score on cognitive tests compared with his/her estimated premorbid score. Larger negative values reflect greater decline in performance from premorbid estimates.

Mentions: In the frontal patients, we found that age significantly predicted the discrepancy score for the RAPM (r2=.084, F (1, 66)=6.039, p=.017, α=.05) and the Stroop test (r2=.272, F (1, 40)=14.958, p<.001, α=.05). In contrast, age did not predict the discrepancy score for the GNT (r2=.029, F (1, 66)=2.005, p=.161, α=.05) or the IL (r2=.014, F (1, 63)=0.884, p=.351 α=.05: see Fig. 1). In the Supplementary materials, we report the relationship between age and the discrepancy score and aetiology (i.e., stroke and tumour; see Fig. S1).


The effect of age on cognitive performance of frontal patients.

Cipolotti L, Healy C, Chan E, MacPherson SE, White M, Woollett K, Turner M, Robinson G, Spanò B, Bozzali M, Shallice T - Neuropsychologia (2015)

Frontal patients' discrepancy score as a function of age and the corresponding regression lines for each neuropsychological test. Legend: ◊=frontal patients, −=frontal patients regression line. Discrepancy score is reported on the y-axis and represents differences in absolute value for each test. 0 represents no discrepancy between each patient's measured post-morbid score on cognitive tests compared with his/her estimated premorbid score. Larger negative values reflect greater decline in performance from premorbid estimates.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4542524&req=5

f0005: Frontal patients' discrepancy score as a function of age and the corresponding regression lines for each neuropsychological test. Legend: ◊=frontal patients, −=frontal patients regression line. Discrepancy score is reported on the y-axis and represents differences in absolute value for each test. 0 represents no discrepancy between each patient's measured post-morbid score on cognitive tests compared with his/her estimated premorbid score. Larger negative values reflect greater decline in performance from premorbid estimates.
Mentions: In the frontal patients, we found that age significantly predicted the discrepancy score for the RAPM (r2=.084, F (1, 66)=6.039, p=.017, α=.05) and the Stroop test (r2=.272, F (1, 40)=14.958, p<.001, α=.05). In contrast, age did not predict the discrepancy score for the GNT (r2=.029, F (1, 66)=2.005, p=.161, α=.05) or the IL (r2=.014, F (1, 63)=0.884, p=.351 α=.05: see Fig. 1). In the Supplementary materials, we report the relationship between age and the discrepancy score and aetiology (i.e., stroke and tumour; see Fig. S1).

Bottom Line: We found that only age consistently predicted the exacerbated executive impairment.Our results are in line with the notion that the frontal cortex plays a critical role in aging to counteract cognitive and neuronal decline.We suggest that the combined effect of aging and frontal lesions impairs the frontal cortical systems by causing its computational power to fall below the threshold needed to complete executive tasks successfully.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuropsychology, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London, UK; Dipartimento di Psicologia, Università di Palermo, Italy. Electronic address: l.cipolotti@ucl.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus