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A Highly Efficient Sensor Platform Using Simply Manufactured Nanodot Patterned Substrates.

Rasappa S, Ghoshal T, Borah D, Senthamaraikannan R, Holmes JD, Morris MA - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Highly dense iron oxide nanodots arrays that mimicked the original BCP pattern were prepared by an 'insitu' BCP inclusion methodology using poly(styrene)-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-b-PEO).The dual detection of EtOH and H2O2 was clearly observed.The as-prepared nanodots have good long term thermal and chemical stability at the substrate and demonstrate promising electrocatalytic performance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Materials Research Group, Department of Chemistry and Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.

ABSTRACT
Block copolymer (BCP) self-assembly is a low-cost means to nanopattern surfaces. Here, we use these nanopatterns to directly print arrays of nanodots onto a conducting substrate (Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) coated glass) for application as an electrochemical sensor for ethanol (EtOH) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) detection. The work demonstrates that BCP systems can be used as a highly efficient, flexible methodology for creating functional surfaces of materials. Highly dense iron oxide nanodots arrays that mimicked the original BCP pattern were prepared by an 'insitu' BCP inclusion methodology using poly(styrene)-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-b-PEO). The electrochemical behaviour of these densely packed arrays of iron oxide nanodots fabricated by two different molecular weight PS-b-PEO systems was studied. The dual detection of EtOH and H2O2 was clearly observed. The as-prepared nanodots have good long term thermal and chemical stability at the substrate and demonstrate promising electrocatalytic performance.

No MeSH data available.


(a) CVs of sample ALW (phosphate buffer, scan rate 50 mV s−1) at different concentrations of H2O2. (b) Ip vs concentration of H2O2. (c) Summary of multiple scanning data (10 runs) of sample ALW in 2.5 μM H2O2.
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f7: (a) CVs of sample ALW (phosphate buffer, scan rate 50 mV s−1) at different concentrations of H2O2. (b) Ip vs concentration of H2O2. (c) Summary of multiple scanning data (10 runs) of sample ALW in 2.5 μM H2O2.

Mentions: Figure 7a illustrates the CVs for the ALW nanodots samples at increasing concentrations of H2O2 (1.0 μM to 3.0 μM, scan rates = 50 mVs−1). Figure 7b shows that the measured peak current is proportional to concentration (R2 = 0.991). This is consistent with an electrocatalytic mechanism as shown by Ojani et al.36). The detection limit, DL, can be estimated from the relationship DL = 3.3 s/m20, where s is the standard deviation of the intercept and m is the slope of the linear current vs H2O2 concentration. The estimated DL value is 3.96 μM. The sensitivity, S, of sample ALW as an electrode was calculated using S = SA(σI/σC) where σI/σC is the slope of Fig. 7b and SA is the sample surface area. S was estimated as 0.04 μA mM−1. Continuous multiple cyclic voltammetry scans of 50 cycles were performed for sample ALW in 2.5 μM H2O2 at a scan rate of 50 mV s−1 as shown in Fig. 7c. There were initially small changes from scan to scan but after 10 scans the data became experimentally indistinguishable and so stability is indicated by showing the first and 10th scans only. The slight changes seen in the figure (a decrease of peak current of ~1.2%) might be due some poisoning of the surface by adsorption of impurities from the solution.


A Highly Efficient Sensor Platform Using Simply Manufactured Nanodot Patterned Substrates.

Rasappa S, Ghoshal T, Borah D, Senthamaraikannan R, Holmes JD, Morris MA - Sci Rep (2015)

(a) CVs of sample ALW (phosphate buffer, scan rate 50 mV s−1) at different concentrations of H2O2. (b) Ip vs concentration of H2O2. (c) Summary of multiple scanning data (10 runs) of sample ALW in 2.5 μM H2O2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4542519&req=5

f7: (a) CVs of sample ALW (phosphate buffer, scan rate 50 mV s−1) at different concentrations of H2O2. (b) Ip vs concentration of H2O2. (c) Summary of multiple scanning data (10 runs) of sample ALW in 2.5 μM H2O2.
Mentions: Figure 7a illustrates the CVs for the ALW nanodots samples at increasing concentrations of H2O2 (1.0 μM to 3.0 μM, scan rates = 50 mVs−1). Figure 7b shows that the measured peak current is proportional to concentration (R2 = 0.991). This is consistent with an electrocatalytic mechanism as shown by Ojani et al.36). The detection limit, DL, can be estimated from the relationship DL = 3.3 s/m20, where s is the standard deviation of the intercept and m is the slope of the linear current vs H2O2 concentration. The estimated DL value is 3.96 μM. The sensitivity, S, of sample ALW as an electrode was calculated using S = SA(σI/σC) where σI/σC is the slope of Fig. 7b and SA is the sample surface area. S was estimated as 0.04 μA mM−1. Continuous multiple cyclic voltammetry scans of 50 cycles were performed for sample ALW in 2.5 μM H2O2 at a scan rate of 50 mV s−1 as shown in Fig. 7c. There were initially small changes from scan to scan but after 10 scans the data became experimentally indistinguishable and so stability is indicated by showing the first and 10th scans only. The slight changes seen in the figure (a decrease of peak current of ~1.2%) might be due some poisoning of the surface by adsorption of impurities from the solution.

Bottom Line: Highly dense iron oxide nanodots arrays that mimicked the original BCP pattern were prepared by an 'insitu' BCP inclusion methodology using poly(styrene)-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-b-PEO).The dual detection of EtOH and H2O2 was clearly observed.The as-prepared nanodots have good long term thermal and chemical stability at the substrate and demonstrate promising electrocatalytic performance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Materials Research Group, Department of Chemistry and Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.

ABSTRACT
Block copolymer (BCP) self-assembly is a low-cost means to nanopattern surfaces. Here, we use these nanopatterns to directly print arrays of nanodots onto a conducting substrate (Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) coated glass) for application as an electrochemical sensor for ethanol (EtOH) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) detection. The work demonstrates that BCP systems can be used as a highly efficient, flexible methodology for creating functional surfaces of materials. Highly dense iron oxide nanodots arrays that mimicked the original BCP pattern were prepared by an 'insitu' BCP inclusion methodology using poly(styrene)-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-b-PEO). The electrochemical behaviour of these densely packed arrays of iron oxide nanodots fabricated by two different molecular weight PS-b-PEO systems was studied. The dual detection of EtOH and H2O2 was clearly observed. The as-prepared nanodots have good long term thermal and chemical stability at the substrate and demonstrate promising electrocatalytic performance.

No MeSH data available.