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Terahertz detectors arrays based on orderly aligned InN nanowires.

Chen X, Liu H, Li Q, Chen H, Peng R, Chu S, Cheng B - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: The InN nanostructures (nanowires and nano-necklaces) were achieved by chemical vapor deposition growth, and then InN nanowires were successfully transferred and aligned into micrometer-sized groups by a "transfer-printing" method.Field effect transistors on aligned nanowires were fabricated and tested for terahertz detection purpose.The detector showed good photoresponse as well as low noise level.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangdong Guangzhou 510275, China.

ABSTRACT
Nanostructured terahertz detectors employing a single semiconducting nanowire or graphene sheet have recently generated considerable interest as an alternative to existing THz technologies, for their merit on the ease of fabrication and above-room-temperature operation. However, the lack of alignment in nanostructure device hindered their potential toward practical applications. The present work reports ordered terahertz detectors arrays based on neatly aligned InN nanowires. The InN nanostructures (nanowires and nano-necklaces) were achieved by chemical vapor deposition growth, and then InN nanowires were successfully transferred and aligned into micrometer-sized groups by a "transfer-printing" method. Field effect transistors on aligned nanowires were fabricated and tested for terahertz detection purpose. The detector showed good photoresponse as well as low noise level. Besides, dense arrays of such detectors were also fabricated, which rendered a peak responsivity of 1.1 V/W from 7 detectors connected in series.

No MeSH data available.


FESEM images of the nanowire and nano-necklace structures.(a) scale bar: 2 μm. (b) scale bar: 1 μm. (c) Magnified SEM images of a typical InN nano-necklace architectures, scale bar: 300 nm.
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f1: FESEM images of the nanowire and nano-necklace structures.(a) scale bar: 2 μm. (b) scale bar: 1 μm. (c) Magnified SEM images of a typical InN nano-necklace architectures, scale bar: 300 nm.

Mentions: The InN nanostructures were prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Although the growth was intentionally designed for only nanowires, however, distinctly, after growth there were two kinds of InN morphologies seen on the as-grown substrate: nanowires and “nano-necklace”. It is then found that the places close to the source grow nanowires whereas further away positions were covered mostly by nano-necklace. Fig. 1a,b are the scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of InN nanowires and nano-necklaces on close and far parts (to the source) of the substrate, respectively. The co-existence of different morphologies suggests that the growth of various InN nanostructures in CVD has narrow growth windows. Thus, slight variation of growth parameter (such as III/V ratio) can yield drastic different growth modes. In addition, the heads or parts of these nanomaterials do not contain gold nanoparticles (method section) in SEM images, indicating the vapor-solid growth mode20. The role of gold nanoparticles prior to the growth is to increase the surface roughness to facilitate vapor nucleation. Magnified SEM image of a typical InN nano-necklace architecture is shown in Fig. 1c, which exhibits clearly that the typical nano-necklace consists of a number of connected and uniform beads. The major and minor waists range from 200 to 400 and 200 to 1000 nm, respectively.


Terahertz detectors arrays based on orderly aligned InN nanowires.

Chen X, Liu H, Li Q, Chen H, Peng R, Chu S, Cheng B - Sci Rep (2015)

FESEM images of the nanowire and nano-necklace structures.(a) scale bar: 2 μm. (b) scale bar: 1 μm. (c) Magnified SEM images of a typical InN nano-necklace architectures, scale bar: 300 nm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4542509&req=5

f1: FESEM images of the nanowire and nano-necklace structures.(a) scale bar: 2 μm. (b) scale bar: 1 μm. (c) Magnified SEM images of a typical InN nano-necklace architectures, scale bar: 300 nm.
Mentions: The InN nanostructures were prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Although the growth was intentionally designed for only nanowires, however, distinctly, after growth there were two kinds of InN morphologies seen on the as-grown substrate: nanowires and “nano-necklace”. It is then found that the places close to the source grow nanowires whereas further away positions were covered mostly by nano-necklace. Fig. 1a,b are the scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of InN nanowires and nano-necklaces on close and far parts (to the source) of the substrate, respectively. The co-existence of different morphologies suggests that the growth of various InN nanostructures in CVD has narrow growth windows. Thus, slight variation of growth parameter (such as III/V ratio) can yield drastic different growth modes. In addition, the heads or parts of these nanomaterials do not contain gold nanoparticles (method section) in SEM images, indicating the vapor-solid growth mode20. The role of gold nanoparticles prior to the growth is to increase the surface roughness to facilitate vapor nucleation. Magnified SEM image of a typical InN nano-necklace architecture is shown in Fig. 1c, which exhibits clearly that the typical nano-necklace consists of a number of connected and uniform beads. The major and minor waists range from 200 to 400 and 200 to 1000 nm, respectively.

Bottom Line: The InN nanostructures (nanowires and nano-necklaces) were achieved by chemical vapor deposition growth, and then InN nanowires were successfully transferred and aligned into micrometer-sized groups by a "transfer-printing" method.Field effect transistors on aligned nanowires were fabricated and tested for terahertz detection purpose.The detector showed good photoresponse as well as low noise level.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technology, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangdong Guangzhou 510275, China.

ABSTRACT
Nanostructured terahertz detectors employing a single semiconducting nanowire or graphene sheet have recently generated considerable interest as an alternative to existing THz technologies, for their merit on the ease of fabrication and above-room-temperature operation. However, the lack of alignment in nanostructure device hindered their potential toward practical applications. The present work reports ordered terahertz detectors arrays based on neatly aligned InN nanowires. The InN nanostructures (nanowires and nano-necklaces) were achieved by chemical vapor deposition growth, and then InN nanowires were successfully transferred and aligned into micrometer-sized groups by a "transfer-printing" method. Field effect transistors on aligned nanowires were fabricated and tested for terahertz detection purpose. The detector showed good photoresponse as well as low noise level. Besides, dense arrays of such detectors were also fabricated, which rendered a peak responsivity of 1.1 V/W from 7 detectors connected in series.

No MeSH data available.