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Effect of ethnicity and socioeconomic variation to the gut microbiota composition among pre-adolescent in Malaysia.

Chong CW, Ahmad AF, Lim YA, Teh CS, Yap IK, Lee SC, Chin YT, Loke P, Chua KH - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Here, we compared the gut bacterial richness and composition of pre-adolescence in Northern Malaysia.Our results suggested a strong ethnicity and socioeconomic-linked bacterial diversity.In addition, predicted functional metagenome profiling suggested an over-representation of pathways pertinent to bacterial colonisation and chemotaxis in the former while the latter exhibited enriched gene pathways related to sugar metabolism.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Life Sciences, School of Pharmacy, International Medical University, 57000 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
Gut microbiota plays an important role in mammalian host metabolism and physiological functions. The functions are particularly important in young children where rapid mental and physical developments are taking place. Nevertheless, little is known about the gut microbiome and the factors that contribute to microbial variation in the gut of South East Asian children. Here, we compared the gut bacterial richness and composition of pre-adolescence in Northern Malaysia. Our subjects covered three distinct ethnic groups with relatively narrow range of socioeconomic discrepancy. These included the Malays (n = 24), Chinese (n = 17) and the Orang Asli (indigenous) (n = 20). Our results suggested a strong ethnicity and socioeconomic-linked bacterial diversity. Highest bacterial diversity was detected from the economically deprived indigenous children while the lowest diversity was recorded from the relatively wealthy Chinese children. In addition, predicted functional metagenome profiling suggested an over-representation of pathways pertinent to bacterial colonisation and chemotaxis in the former while the latter exhibited enriched gene pathways related to sugar metabolism.

No MeSH data available.


Canonical analysis of principal coordinates (CAP) for TRFLP data.A 67% correct prediction rate was recorded based on the cross validation. Note: Dotted samples were chosen for 16S NGS analysis.
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f1: Canonical analysis of principal coordinates (CAP) for TRFLP data.A 67% correct prediction rate was recorded based on the cross validation. Note: Dotted samples were chosen for 16S NGS analysis.

Mentions: Alpha diversity measures including observed Terminal Restriction Fragments (TRFs) and Shannon Diversity Index suggested that the Chinese harboured a significantly lower faecal bacterial richness in comparison to the Malays and Orang Asli (Table S1). However, no significant differences in TRFs richness and evenness were observed between the two latter groups. We subsequently compared the beta diversity (community overlap) using PERMANOVA and CAP analyses. Both marginal and pairwise PERMANOVA achieved statistical significant at P < 0.01, indicating the presence of ethnicity-specific bacterial composition. Consistent result was observed in the CAP ordination (Fig. 1). Interestingly, Orang Asli cluster was found to be more distantly related to Chinese than Malays in CAP1 axis which coincided with the socio-economic status of the subjects.


Effect of ethnicity and socioeconomic variation to the gut microbiota composition among pre-adolescent in Malaysia.

Chong CW, Ahmad AF, Lim YA, Teh CS, Yap IK, Lee SC, Chin YT, Loke P, Chua KH - Sci Rep (2015)

Canonical analysis of principal coordinates (CAP) for TRFLP data.A 67% correct prediction rate was recorded based on the cross validation. Note: Dotted samples were chosen for 16S NGS analysis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4542465&req=5

f1: Canonical analysis of principal coordinates (CAP) for TRFLP data.A 67% correct prediction rate was recorded based on the cross validation. Note: Dotted samples were chosen for 16S NGS analysis.
Mentions: Alpha diversity measures including observed Terminal Restriction Fragments (TRFs) and Shannon Diversity Index suggested that the Chinese harboured a significantly lower faecal bacterial richness in comparison to the Malays and Orang Asli (Table S1). However, no significant differences in TRFs richness and evenness were observed between the two latter groups. We subsequently compared the beta diversity (community overlap) using PERMANOVA and CAP analyses. Both marginal and pairwise PERMANOVA achieved statistical significant at P < 0.01, indicating the presence of ethnicity-specific bacterial composition. Consistent result was observed in the CAP ordination (Fig. 1). Interestingly, Orang Asli cluster was found to be more distantly related to Chinese than Malays in CAP1 axis which coincided with the socio-economic status of the subjects.

Bottom Line: Here, we compared the gut bacterial richness and composition of pre-adolescence in Northern Malaysia.Our results suggested a strong ethnicity and socioeconomic-linked bacterial diversity.In addition, predicted functional metagenome profiling suggested an over-representation of pathways pertinent to bacterial colonisation and chemotaxis in the former while the latter exhibited enriched gene pathways related to sugar metabolism.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Life Sciences, School of Pharmacy, International Medical University, 57000 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
Gut microbiota plays an important role in mammalian host metabolism and physiological functions. The functions are particularly important in young children where rapid mental and physical developments are taking place. Nevertheless, little is known about the gut microbiome and the factors that contribute to microbial variation in the gut of South East Asian children. Here, we compared the gut bacterial richness and composition of pre-adolescence in Northern Malaysia. Our subjects covered three distinct ethnic groups with relatively narrow range of socioeconomic discrepancy. These included the Malays (n = 24), Chinese (n = 17) and the Orang Asli (indigenous) (n = 20). Our results suggested a strong ethnicity and socioeconomic-linked bacterial diversity. Highest bacterial diversity was detected from the economically deprived indigenous children while the lowest diversity was recorded from the relatively wealthy Chinese children. In addition, predicted functional metagenome profiling suggested an over-representation of pathways pertinent to bacterial colonisation and chemotaxis in the former while the latter exhibited enriched gene pathways related to sugar metabolism.

No MeSH data available.