Limits...
On-Chip Sensing of Thermoelectric Thin Film's Merit.

Xiao Z, Zhu X - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: Thermoelectric thin films have been widely explored for thermal-to-electrical energy conversion or solid-state cooling, because they can remove heat from integrated circuit (IC) chips or micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) devices without involving any moving mechanical parts.The silicon diode temperature sensors and thermoelectric devices were fabricated using microfabrication techniques.The fabrication of silicon diode temperature sensors and thermoelectric devices are compatible with the integrated circuit fabrication.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electrical Engineering, Alabama A&M University, Normal, AL 35762, USA. zhigang.xiao@aamu.edu.

ABSTRACT
Thermoelectric thin films have been widely explored for thermal-to-electrical energy conversion or solid-state cooling, because they can remove heat from integrated circuit (IC) chips or micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) devices without involving any moving mechanical parts. In this paper, we report using silicon diode-based temperature sensors and specific thermoelectric devices to characterize the merit of thermoelectric thin films. The silicon diode temperature sensors and thermoelectric devices were fabricated using microfabrication techniques. Specifically, e-beam evaporation was used to grow the thermoelectric thin film of Sb2Te3 (100 nm thick). The Seebeck coefficient and the merit of the Sb2Te3 thin film were measured or determined. The fabrication of silicon diode temperature sensors and thermoelectric devices are compatible with the integrated circuit fabrication.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The variation of the temperature difference between the left and right sides of the in-plane Sb2Te3 integrated thermoelectric device as a function of applied DC electrical currents.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4541931&req=5

sensors-15-17232-f007: The variation of the temperature difference between the left and right sides of the in-plane Sb2Te3 integrated thermoelectric device as a function of applied DC electrical currents.

Mentions: The temperature sensors in the TE devices were calibrated before measurement. The calibration results are shown in Figure 4, Figure 5 and Figure 6. A good linear relation between the electrical current value and temperature was obtained for both Pt serpentine resistor temperature sensor and the silicon diode temperature sensor. The electrical current-voltage (IV) curves in Figure 4 shows the silicon diode temperature sensor has a turn-on voltage of about 0.6 V. The Seebeck coefficient of the Sb2Te3 thin film was then measured, and the measured cross-plane and in-plane Seebeck coefficients were (98 ± 4.5) µV/K and (105.3 ± 5.1) µV/K, respectively. The temperature difference between the left side and the right side of the integrated TE device was measured from the two silicon diode temperature sensors in the device. Figure 7 shows the temperature difference as a function of applied DC electrical currents. The temperature difference increases to a maximum value of about 1.8 K at an applied DC current of 30 mA with the increase of electrical currents, then decreases with further increase of the currents. When the applied current increases, the heating effect becomes larger and larger. As a result, the temperature difference decreases with further increasing current after it reaches its peak value. The ZT value of the integrated Sb2Te3 thin film TE device was obtained as 0.12 ± 0.01. It is possible to make the device to go beyond 1.75 K of temperature difference. The material efficiency of the E-beam-grown Sb2Te3 thin film can be improved by thermal annealing and varying the film thickness for better phonon blocking and hole transmitting in the material, while the efficiency of the device can be further improved by improving the device fabrication such as decreasing the contact resistance.


On-Chip Sensing of Thermoelectric Thin Film's Merit.

Xiao Z, Zhu X - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

The variation of the temperature difference between the left and right sides of the in-plane Sb2Te3 integrated thermoelectric device as a function of applied DC electrical currents.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4541931&req=5

sensors-15-17232-f007: The variation of the temperature difference between the left and right sides of the in-plane Sb2Te3 integrated thermoelectric device as a function of applied DC electrical currents.
Mentions: The temperature sensors in the TE devices were calibrated before measurement. The calibration results are shown in Figure 4, Figure 5 and Figure 6. A good linear relation between the electrical current value and temperature was obtained for both Pt serpentine resistor temperature sensor and the silicon diode temperature sensor. The electrical current-voltage (IV) curves in Figure 4 shows the silicon diode temperature sensor has a turn-on voltage of about 0.6 V. The Seebeck coefficient of the Sb2Te3 thin film was then measured, and the measured cross-plane and in-plane Seebeck coefficients were (98 ± 4.5) µV/K and (105.3 ± 5.1) µV/K, respectively. The temperature difference between the left side and the right side of the integrated TE device was measured from the two silicon diode temperature sensors in the device. Figure 7 shows the temperature difference as a function of applied DC electrical currents. The temperature difference increases to a maximum value of about 1.8 K at an applied DC current of 30 mA with the increase of electrical currents, then decreases with further increase of the currents. When the applied current increases, the heating effect becomes larger and larger. As a result, the temperature difference decreases with further increasing current after it reaches its peak value. The ZT value of the integrated Sb2Te3 thin film TE device was obtained as 0.12 ± 0.01. It is possible to make the device to go beyond 1.75 K of temperature difference. The material efficiency of the E-beam-grown Sb2Te3 thin film can be improved by thermal annealing and varying the film thickness for better phonon blocking and hole transmitting in the material, while the efficiency of the device can be further improved by improving the device fabrication such as decreasing the contact resistance.

Bottom Line: Thermoelectric thin films have been widely explored for thermal-to-electrical energy conversion or solid-state cooling, because they can remove heat from integrated circuit (IC) chips or micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) devices without involving any moving mechanical parts.The silicon diode temperature sensors and thermoelectric devices were fabricated using microfabrication techniques.The fabrication of silicon diode temperature sensors and thermoelectric devices are compatible with the integrated circuit fabrication.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Electrical Engineering, Alabama A&M University, Normal, AL 35762, USA. zhigang.xiao@aamu.edu.

ABSTRACT
Thermoelectric thin films have been widely explored for thermal-to-electrical energy conversion or solid-state cooling, because they can remove heat from integrated circuit (IC) chips or micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) devices without involving any moving mechanical parts. In this paper, we report using silicon diode-based temperature sensors and specific thermoelectric devices to characterize the merit of thermoelectric thin films. The silicon diode temperature sensors and thermoelectric devices were fabricated using microfabrication techniques. Specifically, e-beam evaporation was used to grow the thermoelectric thin film of Sb2Te3 (100 nm thick). The Seebeck coefficient and the merit of the Sb2Te3 thin film were measured or determined. The fabrication of silicon diode temperature sensors and thermoelectric devices are compatible with the integrated circuit fabrication.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus