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Optical Fibre Pressure Sensors in Medical Applications.

Poeggel S, Tosi D, Duraibabu D, Leen G, McGrath D, Lewis E - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: This article is focused on reviewing the current state-of-the-art of optical fibre pressure sensors for medical applications.The small dimensions of optical fibre-based pressure sensors, together with being lightweight and flexible, mean that they are minimally invasive for many medical applications and, thus, particularly suited to in vivo measurement.This paper presents an overview of the recent developments in optical fibre-based pressure measurements with particular reference to these application areas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Optical Fibre Sensors Research Centre, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland. Sven@Poeggel.eu.

ABSTRACT
This article is focused on reviewing the current state-of-the-art of optical fibre pressure sensors for medical applications. Optical fibres have inherent advantages due to their small size, immunity to electromagnetic interferences and their suitability for remote monitoring and multiplexing. The small dimensions of optical fibre-based pressure sensors, together with being lightweight and flexible, mean that they are minimally invasive for many medical applications and, thus, particularly suited to in vivo measurement. This means that the sensor can be placed directly inside a patient, e.g., for urodynamic and cardiovascular assessment. This paper presents an overview of the recent developments in optical fibre-based pressure measurements with particular reference to these application areas.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) OFPTS with EFPI and integrated FBG sensing element [183]; (b) liver phantom with OFPTS; and (c) pressure and temperature distribution in time. (adapted from Figures 21a and 24: Tosi, D., licensed under CC Attribution-Adapt Alike 3.0, 2015 [182])
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f9-sensors-15-17115: (a) OFPTS with EFPI and integrated FBG sensing element [183]; (b) liver phantom with OFPTS; and (c) pressure and temperature distribution in time. (adapted from Figures 21a and 24: Tosi, D., licensed under CC Attribution-Adapt Alike 3.0, 2015 [182])

Mentions: Tosi et al. [86] (2014) performed the first pressure measurement ex vivo for RFA, with an OFPTS (Figure 9a) implementing a sensor on an animal liver phantom (Figure 9b). The sensing system used has the key advantage of having low thermal sensitivity, which allows operation at the point of ablation without the negative effects of large temporal and spatial temperature variations. A methodology for pressure measurement in RFA is reported in [182]. Pressure was recorded as 162 kPa (at 164 °C temperature), while in [86], a peak value of 750 kPa was recorded due to the encapsulation of the phantom (Figure 9c).


Optical Fibre Pressure Sensors in Medical Applications.

Poeggel S, Tosi D, Duraibabu D, Leen G, McGrath D, Lewis E - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

(a) OFPTS with EFPI and integrated FBG sensing element [183]; (b) liver phantom with OFPTS; and (c) pressure and temperature distribution in time. (adapted from Figures 21a and 24: Tosi, D., licensed under CC Attribution-Adapt Alike 3.0, 2015 [182])
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4541926&req=5

f9-sensors-15-17115: (a) OFPTS with EFPI and integrated FBG sensing element [183]; (b) liver phantom with OFPTS; and (c) pressure and temperature distribution in time. (adapted from Figures 21a and 24: Tosi, D., licensed under CC Attribution-Adapt Alike 3.0, 2015 [182])
Mentions: Tosi et al. [86] (2014) performed the first pressure measurement ex vivo for RFA, with an OFPTS (Figure 9a) implementing a sensor on an animal liver phantom (Figure 9b). The sensing system used has the key advantage of having low thermal sensitivity, which allows operation at the point of ablation without the negative effects of large temporal and spatial temperature variations. A methodology for pressure measurement in RFA is reported in [182]. Pressure was recorded as 162 kPa (at 164 °C temperature), while in [86], a peak value of 750 kPa was recorded due to the encapsulation of the phantom (Figure 9c).

Bottom Line: This article is focused on reviewing the current state-of-the-art of optical fibre pressure sensors for medical applications.The small dimensions of optical fibre-based pressure sensors, together with being lightweight and flexible, mean that they are minimally invasive for many medical applications and, thus, particularly suited to in vivo measurement.This paper presents an overview of the recent developments in optical fibre-based pressure measurements with particular reference to these application areas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Optical Fibre Sensors Research Centre, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland. Sven@Poeggel.eu.

ABSTRACT
This article is focused on reviewing the current state-of-the-art of optical fibre pressure sensors for medical applications. Optical fibres have inherent advantages due to their small size, immunity to electromagnetic interferences and their suitability for remote monitoring and multiplexing. The small dimensions of optical fibre-based pressure sensors, together with being lightweight and flexible, mean that they are minimally invasive for many medical applications and, thus, particularly suited to in vivo measurement. This means that the sensor can be placed directly inside a patient, e.g., for urodynamic and cardiovascular assessment. This paper presents an overview of the recent developments in optical fibre-based pressure measurements with particular reference to these application areas.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus