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Optical Fibre Pressure Sensors in Medical Applications.

Poeggel S, Tosi D, Duraibabu D, Leen G, McGrath D, Lewis E - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: This article is focused on reviewing the current state-of-the-art of optical fibre pressure sensors for medical applications.The small dimensions of optical fibre-based pressure sensors, together with being lightweight and flexible, mean that they are minimally invasive for many medical applications and, thus, particularly suited to in vivo measurement.This paper presents an overview of the recent developments in optical fibre-based pressure measurements with particular reference to these application areas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Optical Fibre Sensors Research Centre, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland. Sven@Poeggel.eu.

ABSTRACT
This article is focused on reviewing the current state-of-the-art of optical fibre pressure sensors for medical applications. Optical fibres have inherent advantages due to their small size, immunity to electromagnetic interferences and their suitability for remote monitoring and multiplexing. The small dimensions of optical fibre-based pressure sensors, together with being lightweight and flexible, mean that they are minimally invasive for many medical applications and, thus, particularly suited to in vivo measurement. This means that the sensor can be placed directly inside a patient, e.g., for urodynamic and cardiovascular assessment. This paper presents an overview of the recent developments in optical fibre-based pressure measurements with particular reference to these application areas.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

OFPS (right) illuminated in red and placed into a miniaturized catheter (left).
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f5-sensors-15-17115: OFPS (right) illuminated in red and placed into a miniaturized catheter (left).

Mentions: As previously outlined, modern optical fibre sensing technologies provide many advantages over non-OFS technologies when used for medical application. Their small size (Figure 5) makes them ideal for use in volume-restricted areas. Since they are fabricated from silica glass, they are immune to RF and, therefore, compatible for use in MRI. OFS (a Furukawa company) offers bio-compatible fibres for medical application. These fibres are bend resistant and also offer bio-compatible coatings, certified by North American Science Associates, Inc. (NAMSA) with ISO 10993 [123]. Optical sensors can also be sterilized, without affecting their properties. Stolov et al. [124] demonstrated the possibility of: (i) steam sterilization; (ii) ethylene oxide and (iii) gamma radiation on optical fibres with: (1) dual acrylate; (2) polyimide; (3) silicone polyether ether ketone (PEEK); and (4) fluoroacrylate hard cladding ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE).


Optical Fibre Pressure Sensors in Medical Applications.

Poeggel S, Tosi D, Duraibabu D, Leen G, McGrath D, Lewis E - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

OFPS (right) illuminated in red and placed into a miniaturized catheter (left).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4541926&req=5

f5-sensors-15-17115: OFPS (right) illuminated in red and placed into a miniaturized catheter (left).
Mentions: As previously outlined, modern optical fibre sensing technologies provide many advantages over non-OFS technologies when used for medical application. Their small size (Figure 5) makes them ideal for use in volume-restricted areas. Since they are fabricated from silica glass, they are immune to RF and, therefore, compatible for use in MRI. OFS (a Furukawa company) offers bio-compatible fibres for medical application. These fibres are bend resistant and also offer bio-compatible coatings, certified by North American Science Associates, Inc. (NAMSA) with ISO 10993 [123]. Optical sensors can also be sterilized, without affecting their properties. Stolov et al. [124] demonstrated the possibility of: (i) steam sterilization; (ii) ethylene oxide and (iii) gamma radiation on optical fibres with: (1) dual acrylate; (2) polyimide; (3) silicone polyether ether ketone (PEEK); and (4) fluoroacrylate hard cladding ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE).

Bottom Line: This article is focused on reviewing the current state-of-the-art of optical fibre pressure sensors for medical applications.The small dimensions of optical fibre-based pressure sensors, together with being lightweight and flexible, mean that they are minimally invasive for many medical applications and, thus, particularly suited to in vivo measurement.This paper presents an overview of the recent developments in optical fibre-based pressure measurements with particular reference to these application areas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Optical Fibre Sensors Research Centre, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland. Sven@Poeggel.eu.

ABSTRACT
This article is focused on reviewing the current state-of-the-art of optical fibre pressure sensors for medical applications. Optical fibres have inherent advantages due to their small size, immunity to electromagnetic interferences and their suitability for remote monitoring and multiplexing. The small dimensions of optical fibre-based pressure sensors, together with being lightweight and flexible, mean that they are minimally invasive for many medical applications and, thus, particularly suited to in vivo measurement. This means that the sensor can be placed directly inside a patient, e.g., for urodynamic and cardiovascular assessment. This paper presents an overview of the recent developments in optical fibre-based pressure measurements with particular reference to these application areas.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus