Limits...
Optical Fibre Pressure Sensors in Medical Applications.

Poeggel S, Tosi D, Duraibabu D, Leen G, McGrath D, Lewis E - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: This article is focused on reviewing the current state-of-the-art of optical fibre pressure sensors for medical applications.The small dimensions of optical fibre-based pressure sensors, together with being lightweight and flexible, mean that they are minimally invasive for many medical applications and, thus, particularly suited to in vivo measurement.This paper presents an overview of the recent developments in optical fibre-based pressure measurements with particular reference to these application areas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Optical Fibre Sensors Research Centre, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland. Sven@Poeggel.eu.

ABSTRACT
This article is focused on reviewing the current state-of-the-art of optical fibre pressure sensors for medical applications. Optical fibres have inherent advantages due to their small size, immunity to electromagnetic interferences and their suitability for remote monitoring and multiplexing. The small dimensions of optical fibre-based pressure sensors, together with being lightweight and flexible, mean that they are minimally invasive for many medical applications and, thus, particularly suited to in vivo measurement. This means that the sensor can be placed directly inside a patient, e.g., for urodynamic and cardiovascular assessment. This paper presents an overview of the recent developments in optical fibre-based pressure measurements with particular reference to these application areas.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Body parts with pressure measurements and the relevant underlying physiological/pathophysiological condition associated with each organ/tissue (created in bodyparts3d [13,14]).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4541926&req=5

f1-sensors-15-17115: Body parts with pressure measurements and the relevant underlying physiological/pathophysiological condition associated with each organ/tissue (created in bodyparts3d [13,14]).

Mentions: In the medical field, a sensor represents a device that responds to a physical stimulus and transmits a resulting impulse. Therefore, the fundamental purpose of a sensor system is to accurately measure a signal that enables the well being of a patient to be determined. The human and animal organism is a complex combination of a variety of organs, bones, joints and muscles (Figure 1 [13,14]). Each body part has its own set of characteristics (e.g., volume, structure, inner pressure, etc.). Additionally, each component may undergo a unique dynamic change in pressure, either due to normal physiological changes or as a result of an underlying pathophysiological process during the course of an illness. Clausen and Glott [15] recommended dividing the body pressures into three domains: (1) low pressure regions (e.g., capillaries and brain); (2) medium pressure regions (e.g., heart and lung); and (3) high pressure regions/states (e.g., joints and pressure changes during ablation techniques).


Optical Fibre Pressure Sensors in Medical Applications.

Poeggel S, Tosi D, Duraibabu D, Leen G, McGrath D, Lewis E - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Body parts with pressure measurements and the relevant underlying physiological/pathophysiological condition associated with each organ/tissue (created in bodyparts3d [13,14]).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4541926&req=5

f1-sensors-15-17115: Body parts with pressure measurements and the relevant underlying physiological/pathophysiological condition associated with each organ/tissue (created in bodyparts3d [13,14]).
Mentions: In the medical field, a sensor represents a device that responds to a physical stimulus and transmits a resulting impulse. Therefore, the fundamental purpose of a sensor system is to accurately measure a signal that enables the well being of a patient to be determined. The human and animal organism is a complex combination of a variety of organs, bones, joints and muscles (Figure 1 [13,14]). Each body part has its own set of characteristics (e.g., volume, structure, inner pressure, etc.). Additionally, each component may undergo a unique dynamic change in pressure, either due to normal physiological changes or as a result of an underlying pathophysiological process during the course of an illness. Clausen and Glott [15] recommended dividing the body pressures into three domains: (1) low pressure regions (e.g., capillaries and brain); (2) medium pressure regions (e.g., heart and lung); and (3) high pressure regions/states (e.g., joints and pressure changes during ablation techniques).

Bottom Line: This article is focused on reviewing the current state-of-the-art of optical fibre pressure sensors for medical applications.The small dimensions of optical fibre-based pressure sensors, together with being lightweight and flexible, mean that they are minimally invasive for many medical applications and, thus, particularly suited to in vivo measurement.This paper presents an overview of the recent developments in optical fibre-based pressure measurements with particular reference to these application areas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Optical Fibre Sensors Research Centre, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland. Sven@Poeggel.eu.

ABSTRACT
This article is focused on reviewing the current state-of-the-art of optical fibre pressure sensors for medical applications. Optical fibres have inherent advantages due to their small size, immunity to electromagnetic interferences and their suitability for remote monitoring and multiplexing. The small dimensions of optical fibre-based pressure sensors, together with being lightweight and flexible, mean that they are minimally invasive for many medical applications and, thus, particularly suited to in vivo measurement. This means that the sensor can be placed directly inside a patient, e.g., for urodynamic and cardiovascular assessment. This paper presents an overview of the recent developments in optical fibre-based pressure measurements with particular reference to these application areas.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus