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Application of 3D Printing Technology in Increasing the Diagnostic Performance of Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) for Infectious Diseases.

Singh H, Shimojima M, Shiratori T, An le V, Sugamata M, Yang M - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA)-based diagnosis is the mainstay for measuring antibody response in infectious diseases and to support pathogen identification of potential use in infectious disease outbreaks and clinical care of individual patients.The development of laboratory diagnostics using readily available 3D printing technologies provides a timely opportunity for further expansion of this technology into immunodetection systems.Utilizing available 3D printing platforms, a '3D well' was designed and developed to have an increased surface area compared to those of 96-well plates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Intelligent Mechanical Systems, Graduate School of System Design, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 6-6 Asahigaoka, Hino, Tokyo 191-0065, Japan. singhha3@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA)-based diagnosis is the mainstay for measuring antibody response in infectious diseases and to support pathogen identification of potential use in infectious disease outbreaks and clinical care of individual patients. The development of laboratory diagnostics using readily available 3D printing technologies provides a timely opportunity for further expansion of this technology into immunodetection systems. Utilizing available 3D printing platforms, a '3D well' was designed and developed to have an increased surface area compared to those of 96-well plates. The ease and rapidity of the development of the 3D well prototype provided an opportunity for its rapid validation through the diagnostic performance of ELISA in infectious disease without modifying current laboratory practices for ELISA. The improved sensitivity of the 3D well of up to 2.25-fold higher compared to the 96-well ELISA provides a potential for the expansion of this technology towards miniaturization and Lab-On-a-Chip platforms to reduce time, volume of reagents and samples needed for such assays in the laboratory diagnosis of infectious and other diseases including applications in other disciplines.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

3D well prototype showing (a) top-most layer composed of 8-half oval shapes (left) and side view showing 5 layers of Part A interspersed by 4 layers of Part B (circular shape) (right) and (b) placement of 3D well in the 96-well plate.
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sensors-15-16503-f002: 3D well prototype showing (a) top-most layer composed of 8-half oval shapes (left) and side view showing 5 layers of Part A interspersed by 4 layers of Part B (circular shape) (right) and (b) placement of 3D well in the 96-well plate.

Mentions: These layers form the 3D well in a closed-wall, patent at both ends and share a common core structure. Figure 2a shows the actual 3D well and the placement of the 3D well in the 96-well plate is shown in Figure 2b. In this 3D well, the inner diameter (core) is 2.0 mm, the outermost diameter is 5.5 mm [well diameter, 96-well plate: top (7.0 mm); bottom (6.2 mm)] and the total height is 7.2 mm (inside depth of well, 96-well plate: 11.4 mm) comparable to the parameters established in the 3D well designing stage. Measurements are averages taken from three 3D wells and the error in dimensions is ±0.1 mm (±0.0039 inch). These results are consistent with the achievable accuracy of 3D printing platforms such as the one used in this study of ±0.241 mm (±0.0095 inch) [23].


Application of 3D Printing Technology in Increasing the Diagnostic Performance of Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) for Infectious Diseases.

Singh H, Shimojima M, Shiratori T, An le V, Sugamata M, Yang M - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

3D well prototype showing (a) top-most layer composed of 8-half oval shapes (left) and side view showing 5 layers of Part A interspersed by 4 layers of Part B (circular shape) (right) and (b) placement of 3D well in the 96-well plate.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4541890&req=5

sensors-15-16503-f002: 3D well prototype showing (a) top-most layer composed of 8-half oval shapes (left) and side view showing 5 layers of Part A interspersed by 4 layers of Part B (circular shape) (right) and (b) placement of 3D well in the 96-well plate.
Mentions: These layers form the 3D well in a closed-wall, patent at both ends and share a common core structure. Figure 2a shows the actual 3D well and the placement of the 3D well in the 96-well plate is shown in Figure 2b. In this 3D well, the inner diameter (core) is 2.0 mm, the outermost diameter is 5.5 mm [well diameter, 96-well plate: top (7.0 mm); bottom (6.2 mm)] and the total height is 7.2 mm (inside depth of well, 96-well plate: 11.4 mm) comparable to the parameters established in the 3D well designing stage. Measurements are averages taken from three 3D wells and the error in dimensions is ±0.1 mm (±0.0039 inch). These results are consistent with the achievable accuracy of 3D printing platforms such as the one used in this study of ±0.241 mm (±0.0095 inch) [23].

Bottom Line: Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA)-based diagnosis is the mainstay for measuring antibody response in infectious diseases and to support pathogen identification of potential use in infectious disease outbreaks and clinical care of individual patients.The development of laboratory diagnostics using readily available 3D printing technologies provides a timely opportunity for further expansion of this technology into immunodetection systems.Utilizing available 3D printing platforms, a '3D well' was designed and developed to have an increased surface area compared to those of 96-well plates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Intelligent Mechanical Systems, Graduate School of System Design, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 6-6 Asahigaoka, Hino, Tokyo 191-0065, Japan. singhha3@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA)-based diagnosis is the mainstay for measuring antibody response in infectious diseases and to support pathogen identification of potential use in infectious disease outbreaks and clinical care of individual patients. The development of laboratory diagnostics using readily available 3D printing technologies provides a timely opportunity for further expansion of this technology into immunodetection systems. Utilizing available 3D printing platforms, a '3D well' was designed and developed to have an increased surface area compared to those of 96-well plates. The ease and rapidity of the development of the 3D well prototype provided an opportunity for its rapid validation through the diagnostic performance of ELISA in infectious disease without modifying current laboratory practices for ELISA. The improved sensitivity of the 3D well of up to 2.25-fold higher compared to the 96-well ELISA provides a potential for the expansion of this technology towards miniaturization and Lab-On-a-Chip platforms to reduce time, volume of reagents and samples needed for such assays in the laboratory diagnosis of infectious and other diseases including applications in other disciplines.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus