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Evolution of RFID Applications in Construction: A Literature Review.

Valero E, Adán A, Cerrada C - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: The paper presents the establishment of the RFID technology in four main stages of the lifecycle of a facility: planning and design, construction and commission and operation and maintenance.Concerning this last stage, an RFID application aiming to facilitate the identification of pieces of furniture in scanned inhabited environments is presented.Conclusions and future advances are presented at the end of the paper.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Energy, Geoscience, Infrastructure and Society, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS, UK. e.valero@hw.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Radio frequency identification (RFID) technology has been widely used in the field of construction during the last two decades. Basically, RFID facilitates the control on a wide variety of processes in different stages of the lifecycle of a building, from its conception to its inhabitance. The main objective of this paper is to present a review of RFID applications in the construction industry, pointing out the existing developments, limitations and gaps. The paper presents the establishment of the RFID technology in four main stages of the lifecycle of a facility: planning and design, construction and commission and operation and maintenance. Concerning this last stage, an RFID application aiming to facilitate the identification of pieces of furniture in scanned inhabited environments is presented. Conclusions and future advances are presented at the end of the paper.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Tags attached to pieces of furniture in an inhabited interior; (b) pieces of furniture identified and positioned in a point cloud; (c) 3D model of a classroom.
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f3-sensors-15-15988: (a) Tags attached to pieces of furniture in an inhabited interior; (b) pieces of furniture identified and positioned in a point cloud; (c) 3D model of a classroom.

Mentions: Once RFID and laser scanning operations are completed, the information acquired from the tags (see tags in Figure 3a) is merged with the 3D information to identify and position the pieces of furniture in the scene (see Figure 3b). Finally, a 3D model of the interior is generated (Figure 3c).


Evolution of RFID Applications in Construction: A Literature Review.

Valero E, Adán A, Cerrada C - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

(a) Tags attached to pieces of furniture in an inhabited interior; (b) pieces of furniture identified and positioned in a point cloud; (c) 3D model of a classroom.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4541864&req=5

f3-sensors-15-15988: (a) Tags attached to pieces of furniture in an inhabited interior; (b) pieces of furniture identified and positioned in a point cloud; (c) 3D model of a classroom.
Mentions: Once RFID and laser scanning operations are completed, the information acquired from the tags (see tags in Figure 3a) is merged with the 3D information to identify and position the pieces of furniture in the scene (see Figure 3b). Finally, a 3D model of the interior is generated (Figure 3c).

Bottom Line: The paper presents the establishment of the RFID technology in four main stages of the lifecycle of a facility: planning and design, construction and commission and operation and maintenance.Concerning this last stage, an RFID application aiming to facilitate the identification of pieces of furniture in scanned inhabited environments is presented.Conclusions and future advances are presented at the end of the paper.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Energy, Geoscience, Infrastructure and Society, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS, UK. e.valero@hw.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Radio frequency identification (RFID) technology has been widely used in the field of construction during the last two decades. Basically, RFID facilitates the control on a wide variety of processes in different stages of the lifecycle of a building, from its conception to its inhabitance. The main objective of this paper is to present a review of RFID applications in the construction industry, pointing out the existing developments, limitations and gaps. The paper presents the establishment of the RFID technology in four main stages of the lifecycle of a facility: planning and design, construction and commission and operation and maintenance. Concerning this last stage, an RFID application aiming to facilitate the identification of pieces of furniture in scanned inhabited environments is presented. Conclusions and future advances are presented at the end of the paper.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus