Limits...
UAV Deployment Exercise for Mapping Purposes: Evaluation of Emergency Response Applications.

Boccardo P, Chiabrando F, Dutto F, Tonolo FG, Lingua A - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: Exploiting the decrease of costs related to UAV technology, the humanitarian community started piloting the use of similar systems in humanitarian crises several years ago in different application fields, i.e., disaster mapping and information gathering, community capacity building, logistics and even transportation of goods.The main phases of the adopted operational procedure will be discussed and assessed especially in terms of time required to carry out each step, highlighting potential bottlenecks and in view of the national regulation framework, which is rapidly evolving.Different methodologies for the processing of the acquired data will be described and discussed, evaluating the fitness for emergency response applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Politecnico di Torino-Interuniversity Department of Regional and Urban Studies and Planning (DIST), Viale Mattioli 39, 10125 Torino, Italy. piero.boccardo@polito.it.

ABSTRACT
Exploiting the decrease of costs related to UAV technology, the humanitarian community started piloting the use of similar systems in humanitarian crises several years ago in different application fields, i.e., disaster mapping and information gathering, community capacity building, logistics and even transportation of goods. Part of the author's group, composed of researchers in the field of applied geomatics, has been piloting the use of UAVs since 2006, with a specific focus on disaster management application. In the framework of such activities, a UAV deployment exercise was jointly organized with the Regional Civil Protection authority, mainly aimed at assessing the operational procedures to deploy UAVs for mapping purposes and the usability of the acquired data in an emergency response context. In the paper the technical features of the UAV platforms will be described, comparing the main advantages/disadvantages of fixed-wing versus rotor platforms. The main phases of the adopted operational procedure will be discussed and assessed especially in terms of time required to carry out each step, highlighting potential bottlenecks and in view of the national regulation framework, which is rapidly evolving. Different methodologies for the processing of the acquired data will be described and discussed, evaluating the fitness for emergency response applications.

No MeSH data available.


The multi-rotor RPAS planned flight plans: 70-m flight height above the ground (left) and 150-m flight height above the ground flight (right).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4541851&req=5

sensors-15-15717-f004: The multi-rotor RPAS planned flight plans: 70-m flight height above the ground (left) and 150-m flight height above the ground flight (right).

Mentions: In order to have two different sets of test images and to simulate operations in the two volumes of space mentioned by the Italian RPAS regulation, two different flights were planned and carried out. One flight with a height of 70 m (the maximum height above the ground allowed by volume of space V70 according to the ENAC regulation) and a second flight performed at 150 m (the maximum height above the ground allowed by volume of space V150 according to the ENAC regulation). In the first case, the area was covered with eight stripes and 190 images characterized by a ground sample distance (GSD) of 0.022 m. The second flight allowed the coverage of the area with four stripes and 120 images with a GSD of 0.05 m. The longitudinal and lateral overlapping were respectively set at 80% and 30% in both cases. Using the Hexakopter, the flight plan is managed by the Mikrokopter tool OSD that connects the platform to the ground station. The tool is exploited to set all of the parameters of the flight plan, using as a reference map of the area one of the images made available by several on-line map servers (e.g., Google Maps, Bing Maps, etc.). The flight planning approach is the usual one based on the definition of waypoints (a reference point in the physical space used for the navigation, usually placed at the beginning and at the end of the stripes).The RPAS aims to follow the direction between the starting and ending points according to the defined azimuth. In Figure 4, two screen shots of the planned flight plans are shown. A good practice is also to insert the last waypoint close to the take-off and landing area (Figure 4 (left), waypoint P17), in order to simplify the manual landing operation.


UAV Deployment Exercise for Mapping Purposes: Evaluation of Emergency Response Applications.

Boccardo P, Chiabrando F, Dutto F, Tonolo FG, Lingua A - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

The multi-rotor RPAS planned flight plans: 70-m flight height above the ground (left) and 150-m flight height above the ground flight (right).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4541851&req=5

sensors-15-15717-f004: The multi-rotor RPAS planned flight plans: 70-m flight height above the ground (left) and 150-m flight height above the ground flight (right).
Mentions: In order to have two different sets of test images and to simulate operations in the two volumes of space mentioned by the Italian RPAS regulation, two different flights were planned and carried out. One flight with a height of 70 m (the maximum height above the ground allowed by volume of space V70 according to the ENAC regulation) and a second flight performed at 150 m (the maximum height above the ground allowed by volume of space V150 according to the ENAC regulation). In the first case, the area was covered with eight stripes and 190 images characterized by a ground sample distance (GSD) of 0.022 m. The second flight allowed the coverage of the area with four stripes and 120 images with a GSD of 0.05 m. The longitudinal and lateral overlapping were respectively set at 80% and 30% in both cases. Using the Hexakopter, the flight plan is managed by the Mikrokopter tool OSD that connects the platform to the ground station. The tool is exploited to set all of the parameters of the flight plan, using as a reference map of the area one of the images made available by several on-line map servers (e.g., Google Maps, Bing Maps, etc.). The flight planning approach is the usual one based on the definition of waypoints (a reference point in the physical space used for the navigation, usually placed at the beginning and at the end of the stripes).The RPAS aims to follow the direction between the starting and ending points according to the defined azimuth. In Figure 4, two screen shots of the planned flight plans are shown. A good practice is also to insert the last waypoint close to the take-off and landing area (Figure 4 (left), waypoint P17), in order to simplify the manual landing operation.

Bottom Line: Exploiting the decrease of costs related to UAV technology, the humanitarian community started piloting the use of similar systems in humanitarian crises several years ago in different application fields, i.e., disaster mapping and information gathering, community capacity building, logistics and even transportation of goods.The main phases of the adopted operational procedure will be discussed and assessed especially in terms of time required to carry out each step, highlighting potential bottlenecks and in view of the national regulation framework, which is rapidly evolving.Different methodologies for the processing of the acquired data will be described and discussed, evaluating the fitness for emergency response applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Politecnico di Torino-Interuniversity Department of Regional and Urban Studies and Planning (DIST), Viale Mattioli 39, 10125 Torino, Italy. piero.boccardo@polito.it.

ABSTRACT
Exploiting the decrease of costs related to UAV technology, the humanitarian community started piloting the use of similar systems in humanitarian crises several years ago in different application fields, i.e., disaster mapping and information gathering, community capacity building, logistics and even transportation of goods. Part of the author's group, composed of researchers in the field of applied geomatics, has been piloting the use of UAVs since 2006, with a specific focus on disaster management application. In the framework of such activities, a UAV deployment exercise was jointly organized with the Regional Civil Protection authority, mainly aimed at assessing the operational procedures to deploy UAVs for mapping purposes and the usability of the acquired data in an emergency response context. In the paper the technical features of the UAV platforms will be described, comparing the main advantages/disadvantages of fixed-wing versus rotor platforms. The main phases of the adopted operational procedure will be discussed and assessed especially in terms of time required to carry out each step, highlighting potential bottlenecks and in view of the national regulation framework, which is rapidly evolving. Different methodologies for the processing of the acquired data will be described and discussed, evaluating the fitness for emergency response applications.

No MeSH data available.