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Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensing: Current Challenges and Approaches.

Unser S, Bruzas I, He J, Sagle L - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: In this article, we have categorized these challenges into four categories: improving sensitivity and limit of detection, selectivity in complex biological solutions, sensitive detection of membrane-associated species, and the adaptation of sensing elements for point-of-care diagnostic devices.The following section will describe various LSPR platforms designed for the sensitive detection of membrane-associated species.Finally, recent advances towards multiplexed and microfluidic LSPR-based devices for inexpensive, rapid, point-of-care diagnostics will be discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, University of Cincinnati, 301 West Clifton Court, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0172, USA. unsersa@mail.uc.edu.

ABSTRACT
Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) has emerged as a leader among label-free biosensing techniques in that it offers sensitive, robust, and facile detection. Traditional LSPR-based biosensing utilizes the sensitivity of the plasmon frequency to changes in local index of refraction at the nanoparticle surface. Although surface plasmon resonance technologies are now widely used to measure biomolecular interactions, several challenges remain. In this article, we have categorized these challenges into four categories: improving sensitivity and limit of detection, selectivity in complex biological solutions, sensitive detection of membrane-associated species, and the adaptation of sensing elements for point-of-care diagnostic devices. The first section of this article will involve a conceptual discussion of surface plasmon resonance and the factors affecting changes in optical signal detected. The following sections will discuss applications of LSPR biosensing with an emphasis on recent advances and approaches to overcome the four limitations mentioned above. First, improvements in limit of detection through various amplification strategies will be highlighted. The second section will involve advances to improve selectivity in complex media through self-assembled monolayers, "plasmon ruler" devices involving plasmonic coupling, and shape complementarity on the nanoparticle surface. The following section will describe various LSPR platforms designed for the sensitive detection of membrane-associated species. Finally, recent advances towards multiplexed and microfluidic LSPR-based devices for inexpensive, rapid, point-of-care diagnostics will be discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic of the 8-channel microfluidic device containing both control and flow layers, (a); Each channel contains multiple “spots” of gold nanodisc arrays for multiplexed biosensing measurements, (b) (inset has a scale bar of 200 nm); Overview of the optical setup used to measure the plasmonic response of the nanoparticle spot arrays within the channels, (c) Reproduced with permission from [162].
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sensors-15-15684-f009: Schematic of the 8-channel microfluidic device containing both control and flow layers, (a); Each channel contains multiple “spots” of gold nanodisc arrays for multiplexed biosensing measurements, (b) (inset has a scale bar of 200 nm); Overview of the optical setup used to measure the plasmonic response of the nanoparticle spot arrays within the channels, (c) Reproduced with permission from [162].

Mentions: A recent study created a microfluidic device containing nanodisc arrays in eight different continuous flow channels. Electron beam lithography is used to “write” nanodisc spot arrays into the microfluidic channels, which are then sealed with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) [162], see Figure 9. Precise flowing and independent control of each channel is possible by interfacing the pumps with a LabView program. Since each channel contains several spots of gold nanodisc arrays, this design can give many sensing sites from only eight channels. Kinetic binding data is then demonstrated with this device for various cancer biomarkers, such as human alpha-feto protein and prostate specific antigen, with a limit of detection of 500 pg/mL in 50% human serum. Another recent study by Lee and co-workers developed a 50-channel microfluidic system using silver nanohole arrays coated in silica, which conveniently seal in a facile manner to PDMS. The capability to measure both binding kinetics and affinities simultaneously was then demonstrated with Cholera Toxin B subunit binding to ganglioside lipids in solid supported lipid bilayers present in the microfluidic channels [163].


Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensing: Current Challenges and Approaches.

Unser S, Bruzas I, He J, Sagle L - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Schematic of the 8-channel microfluidic device containing both control and flow layers, (a); Each channel contains multiple “spots” of gold nanodisc arrays for multiplexed biosensing measurements, (b) (inset has a scale bar of 200 nm); Overview of the optical setup used to measure the plasmonic response of the nanoparticle spot arrays within the channels, (c) Reproduced with permission from [162].
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4541850&req=5

sensors-15-15684-f009: Schematic of the 8-channel microfluidic device containing both control and flow layers, (a); Each channel contains multiple “spots” of gold nanodisc arrays for multiplexed biosensing measurements, (b) (inset has a scale bar of 200 nm); Overview of the optical setup used to measure the plasmonic response of the nanoparticle spot arrays within the channels, (c) Reproduced with permission from [162].
Mentions: A recent study created a microfluidic device containing nanodisc arrays in eight different continuous flow channels. Electron beam lithography is used to “write” nanodisc spot arrays into the microfluidic channels, which are then sealed with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) [162], see Figure 9. Precise flowing and independent control of each channel is possible by interfacing the pumps with a LabView program. Since each channel contains several spots of gold nanodisc arrays, this design can give many sensing sites from only eight channels. Kinetic binding data is then demonstrated with this device for various cancer biomarkers, such as human alpha-feto protein and prostate specific antigen, with a limit of detection of 500 pg/mL in 50% human serum. Another recent study by Lee and co-workers developed a 50-channel microfluidic system using silver nanohole arrays coated in silica, which conveniently seal in a facile manner to PDMS. The capability to measure both binding kinetics and affinities simultaneously was then demonstrated with Cholera Toxin B subunit binding to ganglioside lipids in solid supported lipid bilayers present in the microfluidic channels [163].

Bottom Line: In this article, we have categorized these challenges into four categories: improving sensitivity and limit of detection, selectivity in complex biological solutions, sensitive detection of membrane-associated species, and the adaptation of sensing elements for point-of-care diagnostic devices.The following section will describe various LSPR platforms designed for the sensitive detection of membrane-associated species.Finally, recent advances towards multiplexed and microfluidic LSPR-based devices for inexpensive, rapid, point-of-care diagnostics will be discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, College of Arts and Sciences, University of Cincinnati, 301 West Clifton Court, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0172, USA. unsersa@mail.uc.edu.

ABSTRACT
Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) has emerged as a leader among label-free biosensing techniques in that it offers sensitive, robust, and facile detection. Traditional LSPR-based biosensing utilizes the sensitivity of the plasmon frequency to changes in local index of refraction at the nanoparticle surface. Although surface plasmon resonance technologies are now widely used to measure biomolecular interactions, several challenges remain. In this article, we have categorized these challenges into four categories: improving sensitivity and limit of detection, selectivity in complex biological solutions, sensitive detection of membrane-associated species, and the adaptation of sensing elements for point-of-care diagnostic devices. The first section of this article will involve a conceptual discussion of surface plasmon resonance and the factors affecting changes in optical signal detected. The following sections will discuss applications of LSPR biosensing with an emphasis on recent advances and approaches to overcome the four limitations mentioned above. First, improvements in limit of detection through various amplification strategies will be highlighted. The second section will involve advances to improve selectivity in complex media through self-assembled monolayers, "plasmon ruler" devices involving plasmonic coupling, and shape complementarity on the nanoparticle surface. The following section will describe various LSPR platforms designed for the sensitive detection of membrane-associated species. Finally, recent advances towards multiplexed and microfluidic LSPR-based devices for inexpensive, rapid, point-of-care diagnostics will be discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus