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Fruit and Vegetable Quality Assessment via Dielectric Sensing.

El Khaled D, Novas N, Gazquez JA, Garcia RM, Manzano-Agugliaro F - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: The demand for improved food quality has been accompanied by a technological boost.A better electrical characterization of the dielectric properties of fruits and vegetables is required for this purpose.It comprehensively and chronologically covers the dielectric experiments explored for fruits and vegetables, along with their appropriate sensing instrumentation, analytical modelling methods and conclusions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departmentof Engineering, University of Almería, 04120 Almería, Spain. dalia.elkhaled@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
The demand for improved food quality has been accompanied by a technological boost. This fact enhances the possibility of improving the quality of horticultural products, leading towards healthier consumption of fruits and vegetables. A better electrical characterization of the dielectric properties of fruits and vegetables is required for this purpose. Moreover, a focused study of dielectric spectroscopy and advanced dielectric sensing is a highly interesting topic. This review explains the dielectric property basics and classifies the dielectric spectroscopy measurement techniques. It comprehensively and chronologically covers the dielectric experiments explored for fruits and vegetables, along with their appropriate sensing instrumentation, analytical modelling methods and conclusions. An in-depth definition of dielectric spectroscopy and its usefulness in the electric characterization of food materials is presented, along with the various sensor techniques used for dielectric measurements. The collective data are tabulated in a summary of the dielectric findings in horticultural field investigations, which will facilitate more advanced and focused explorations in the future.

No MeSH data available.


Dielectric property measurement techniques.
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sensors-15-15363-f002: Dielectric property measurement techniques.

Mentions: Generally, for frequencies that are higher than the one mentioned earlier (1 GHz and above), several MW measurement techniques are available [56]. Other instruments, such as transmission lines, resonant cavities, free space techniques and waveguide systems, were used [57]. MW dielectric properties measurements can be classified as reflection or transmission measurements using resonant or non-resonant systems, with open or closed structures for the sensing of the properties of material samples [58]. Closed-structure methods include waveguide and coaxial-line transmission measurements and short-circuited waveguide or coaxial-line reflection measurements. Nelson described the classification of the MW techniques as follows; Open structure techniques include free-space transmission measurements and open-ended coaxial-line or open-ended waveguide measurements. Resonant structures can include either closed resonant cavities or open resonant structures operated as two-port devices for transmission measurements or as one-port devices for reflection measurements [44]. A schematic diagram of methods to measure dielectric properties is provided in Figure 2.


Fruit and Vegetable Quality Assessment via Dielectric Sensing.

El Khaled D, Novas N, Gazquez JA, Garcia RM, Manzano-Agugliaro F - Sensors (Basel) (2015)

Dielectric property measurement techniques.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4541835&req=5

sensors-15-15363-f002: Dielectric property measurement techniques.
Mentions: Generally, for frequencies that are higher than the one mentioned earlier (1 GHz and above), several MW measurement techniques are available [56]. Other instruments, such as transmission lines, resonant cavities, free space techniques and waveguide systems, were used [57]. MW dielectric properties measurements can be classified as reflection or transmission measurements using resonant or non-resonant systems, with open or closed structures for the sensing of the properties of material samples [58]. Closed-structure methods include waveguide and coaxial-line transmission measurements and short-circuited waveguide or coaxial-line reflection measurements. Nelson described the classification of the MW techniques as follows; Open structure techniques include free-space transmission measurements and open-ended coaxial-line or open-ended waveguide measurements. Resonant structures can include either closed resonant cavities or open resonant structures operated as two-port devices for transmission measurements or as one-port devices for reflection measurements [44]. A schematic diagram of methods to measure dielectric properties is provided in Figure 2.

Bottom Line: The demand for improved food quality has been accompanied by a technological boost.A better electrical characterization of the dielectric properties of fruits and vegetables is required for this purpose.It comprehensively and chronologically covers the dielectric experiments explored for fruits and vegetables, along with their appropriate sensing instrumentation, analytical modelling methods and conclusions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departmentof Engineering, University of Almería, 04120 Almería, Spain. dalia.elkhaled@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
The demand for improved food quality has been accompanied by a technological boost. This fact enhances the possibility of improving the quality of horticultural products, leading towards healthier consumption of fruits and vegetables. A better electrical characterization of the dielectric properties of fruits and vegetables is required for this purpose. Moreover, a focused study of dielectric spectroscopy and advanced dielectric sensing is a highly interesting topic. This review explains the dielectric property basics and classifies the dielectric spectroscopy measurement techniques. It comprehensively and chronologically covers the dielectric experiments explored for fruits and vegetables, along with their appropriate sensing instrumentation, analytical modelling methods and conclusions. An in-depth definition of dielectric spectroscopy and its usefulness in the electric characterization of food materials is presented, along with the various sensor techniques used for dielectric measurements. The collective data are tabulated in a summary of the dielectric findings in horticultural field investigations, which will facilitate more advanced and focused explorations in the future.

No MeSH data available.