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Impact of body mass index on outcome in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting and/or valve replacement surgery.

Costa VE, Ferolla SM, Reis TO, Rabello RR, Rocha EA, Couto CM, Couto JC, Bento A - Rev Bras Cir Cardiovasc (2015 Jul-Sep)

Bottom Line: Multivariate analysis identified obesity as an independent predictor of increased risk of surgical reintervention (odds ratio [OR] 13.6; 95%CI 1.1 - 162.9; P=0.046) and reduced risk of bleeding (OR 0.05; 95% CI 0.09 - 0.69; P=0.025).Univariate analysis showed that obesity was associated with increased frequency of wound dehiscence (P=0.021).There was also no association between body mass index and duration of cardiopulmonary bypass, aortic clamping, mechanical ventilation, and intensive care unit or hospital stay.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hospital Vera Cruz, Belo Horizonte, MG, BR.

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study aimed to analyze the impact of body mass index on outcomes of 101 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting, valve replacement, or combined valve/ coronary artery bypass grafting surgery in a private hospital in Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

Methods: This was a prospective cross-sectional study of patients undergoing cardiac surgery from May 2009 to December 2012. All patients were followed up from the first day of admission until discharge or death. Patients were divided into three groups according to BMI: normal weight, overweight, and obese. The main outcome measure was the association between BMI and postoperative morbidities and mortality.

Results: Multivariate analysis identified obesity as an independent predictor of increased risk of surgical reintervention (odds ratio [OR] 13.6; 95%CI 1.1 - 162.9; P=0.046) and reduced risk of bleeding (OR 0.05; 95% CI 0.09 - 0.69; P=0.025). Univariate analysis showed that obesity was associated with increased frequency of wound dehiscence (P=0.021). There was no association between BMI and other complications or mortality in univariate analysis. There was also no association between body mass index and duration of cardiopulmonary bypass, aortic clamping, mechanical ventilation, and intensive care unit or hospital stay.

Conclusion: Obese individuals undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting, valve replacement, or combined surgery have a higher postoperative risk of surgical reintervention and lower chances of bleeding.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Body mass index distribution in pre-operative patients for heart surgery.
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f01: Body mass index distribution in pre-operative patients for heart surgery.

Mentions: A total of 101 patients were included in this study and most were male (73.3%).Sixty-one percent were elderly, with a mean age of 61.8±10.1 years. The mean BMIwas 27.3±4.3 kg/m2 (Figure 1).Approximately 32.0% of patients had a healthy weight, 47.5% were overweight, and 20.8%were obese. The mean serum albumin level in the preoperative period was 4.1±0.6g/dL. None of the participants was malnourished in the pre-operative period according toBMI classification. A minority (9.0%) had serum albumin less than 3.5 g/dL. When thestudy population was stratified according to BMI classification, there was nosignificant difference in the frequency of elderly individuals between the groups (Table 2).


Impact of body mass index on outcome in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting and/or valve replacement surgery.

Costa VE, Ferolla SM, Reis TO, Rabello RR, Rocha EA, Couto CM, Couto JC, Bento A - Rev Bras Cir Cardiovasc (2015 Jul-Sep)

Body mass index distribution in pre-operative patients for heart surgery.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4541780&req=5

f01: Body mass index distribution in pre-operative patients for heart surgery.
Mentions: A total of 101 patients were included in this study and most were male (73.3%).Sixty-one percent were elderly, with a mean age of 61.8±10.1 years. The mean BMIwas 27.3±4.3 kg/m2 (Figure 1).Approximately 32.0% of patients had a healthy weight, 47.5% were overweight, and 20.8%were obese. The mean serum albumin level in the preoperative period was 4.1±0.6g/dL. None of the participants was malnourished in the pre-operative period according toBMI classification. A minority (9.0%) had serum albumin less than 3.5 g/dL. When thestudy population was stratified according to BMI classification, there was nosignificant difference in the frequency of elderly individuals between the groups (Table 2).

Bottom Line: Multivariate analysis identified obesity as an independent predictor of increased risk of surgical reintervention (odds ratio [OR] 13.6; 95%CI 1.1 - 162.9; P=0.046) and reduced risk of bleeding (OR 0.05; 95% CI 0.09 - 0.69; P=0.025).Univariate analysis showed that obesity was associated with increased frequency of wound dehiscence (P=0.021).There was also no association between body mass index and duration of cardiopulmonary bypass, aortic clamping, mechanical ventilation, and intensive care unit or hospital stay.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hospital Vera Cruz, Belo Horizonte, MG, BR.

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study aimed to analyze the impact of body mass index on outcomes of 101 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting, valve replacement, or combined valve/ coronary artery bypass grafting surgery in a private hospital in Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

Methods: This was a prospective cross-sectional study of patients undergoing cardiac surgery from May 2009 to December 2012. All patients were followed up from the first day of admission until discharge or death. Patients were divided into three groups according to BMI: normal weight, overweight, and obese. The main outcome measure was the association between BMI and postoperative morbidities and mortality.

Results: Multivariate analysis identified obesity as an independent predictor of increased risk of surgical reintervention (odds ratio [OR] 13.6; 95%CI 1.1 - 162.9; P=0.046) and reduced risk of bleeding (OR 0.05; 95% CI 0.09 - 0.69; P=0.025). Univariate analysis showed that obesity was associated with increased frequency of wound dehiscence (P=0.021). There was no association between BMI and other complications or mortality in univariate analysis. There was also no association between body mass index and duration of cardiopulmonary bypass, aortic clamping, mechanical ventilation, and intensive care unit or hospital stay.

Conclusion: Obese individuals undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting, valve replacement, or combined surgery have a higher postoperative risk of surgical reintervention and lower chances of bleeding.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus