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Correlates of sitting time in adults with type 2 diabetes.

Brazeau AS, Hajna S, Joseph L, Dasgupta K - BMC Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Sitting time correlates were being an immigrant (56 fewer minutes/day spent sitting compared to non- immigrants, 95 % credible interval, CrI: -100, -11) and having a university degree (55 more minutes/day spent sitting compared to those without a university degree, 95 % CrI: 10, 100) after adjustment for potential correlates observed in univariate analyses (sex, age, job status, waist circumference, depressed mood, steps).Therefore, high sitting time and low step counts are behaviours that may need to be independently targeted.Interventions to reduce sitting time in adults with type 2 diabetes may need to target non-immigrants and those with a university degree.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, McGill University, 687 Pine Avenue West, V-Building (V0.06), Montréal, QC, H3A 1A1, Canada. anne-sophie.brazeau@mail.mcgill.ca.

ABSTRACT

Background: Studies suggest a relationship between sitting time and cardiovascular disease mortality. Our aim was to identify socio-demographic, contextual, and clinical (e.g., body composition, diabetes duration) correlates of self-reported sitting time among adults with type 2 diabetes, a clinical population at high risk for cardiovascular disease. We sought to determine if there was an inverse relationship between sitting and step counts in a diabetes cohort in whom we had previously identified low step counts with further lowering in fall/winter.

Methods: The cohort included 198 adults (54 % men; age 60.0 SD 11.5 years; Body mass index 30.4 SD 5.6 kg/m(2)) (Montréal, Canada). Socio-demographic, contextual and clinical factors were assessed using standardized questionnaires and step counts with a pedometer over 14 days (concealed viewing windows). Total sitting time was estimated once per season (up to 4 times per year at -month intervals) using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short version. Potential sitting time correlates were evaluated using Bayesian longitudinal hierarchical linear regression models in participants with sitting time data (n = 191).

Results: The average sitting time was 308 (SD 161) minutes/day without variation across seasons. Sitting time correlates were being an immigrant (56 fewer minutes/day spent sitting compared to non- immigrants, 95 % credible interval, CrI: -100, -11) and having a university degree (55 more minutes/day spent sitting compared to those without a university degree, 95 % CrI: 10, 100) after adjustment for potential correlates observed in univariate analyses (sex, age, job status, waist circumference, depressed mood, steps). Correlation between sitting and steps, adjusted for age and sex, was -0.144 (95 % CI: -0.280, 0.002).

Conclusion: There was low correlation between sitting time and step counts. Therefore, high sitting time and low step counts are behaviours that may need to be independently targeted. Interventions to reduce sitting time in adults with type 2 diabetes may need to target non-immigrants and those with a university degree.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Behaviours’ change between seasons. Changes between seasons were available for 142 individuals. Data are mean with 95 % confidence intervals
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Fig2: Behaviours’ change between seasons. Changes between seasons were available for 142 individuals. Data are mean with 95 % confidence intervals

Mentions: Correlation between average self-reported sitting time and pedometer-assessed step counts, adjusted for age and sex, was −0.144 (95 % CI −0.280, 0.002). We observed a 26.6 % (95 % CI 18.2, 39.1) higher step count value during spring/summer but the spring/summer- fall/winter difference in sitting time was inconclusive (7.1 %; 95 % CI −4.4, 18.7) (Fig. 2).Fig. 2


Correlates of sitting time in adults with type 2 diabetes.

Brazeau AS, Hajna S, Joseph L, Dasgupta K - BMC Public Health (2015)

Behaviours’ change between seasons. Changes between seasons were available for 142 individuals. Data are mean with 95 % confidence intervals
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4541749&req=5

Fig2: Behaviours’ change between seasons. Changes between seasons were available for 142 individuals. Data are mean with 95 % confidence intervals
Mentions: Correlation between average self-reported sitting time and pedometer-assessed step counts, adjusted for age and sex, was −0.144 (95 % CI −0.280, 0.002). We observed a 26.6 % (95 % CI 18.2, 39.1) higher step count value during spring/summer but the spring/summer- fall/winter difference in sitting time was inconclusive (7.1 %; 95 % CI −4.4, 18.7) (Fig. 2).Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Sitting time correlates were being an immigrant (56 fewer minutes/day spent sitting compared to non- immigrants, 95 % credible interval, CrI: -100, -11) and having a university degree (55 more minutes/day spent sitting compared to those without a university degree, 95 % CrI: 10, 100) after adjustment for potential correlates observed in univariate analyses (sex, age, job status, waist circumference, depressed mood, steps).Therefore, high sitting time and low step counts are behaviours that may need to be independently targeted.Interventions to reduce sitting time in adults with type 2 diabetes may need to target non-immigrants and those with a university degree.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, McGill University, 687 Pine Avenue West, V-Building (V0.06), Montréal, QC, H3A 1A1, Canada. anne-sophie.brazeau@mail.mcgill.ca.

ABSTRACT

Background: Studies suggest a relationship between sitting time and cardiovascular disease mortality. Our aim was to identify socio-demographic, contextual, and clinical (e.g., body composition, diabetes duration) correlates of self-reported sitting time among adults with type 2 diabetes, a clinical population at high risk for cardiovascular disease. We sought to determine if there was an inverse relationship between sitting and step counts in a diabetes cohort in whom we had previously identified low step counts with further lowering in fall/winter.

Methods: The cohort included 198 adults (54 % men; age 60.0 SD 11.5 years; Body mass index 30.4 SD 5.6 kg/m(2)) (Montréal, Canada). Socio-demographic, contextual and clinical factors were assessed using standardized questionnaires and step counts with a pedometer over 14 days (concealed viewing windows). Total sitting time was estimated once per season (up to 4 times per year at -month intervals) using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short version. Potential sitting time correlates were evaluated using Bayesian longitudinal hierarchical linear regression models in participants with sitting time data (n = 191).

Results: The average sitting time was 308 (SD 161) minutes/day without variation across seasons. Sitting time correlates were being an immigrant (56 fewer minutes/day spent sitting compared to non- immigrants, 95 % credible interval, CrI: -100, -11) and having a university degree (55 more minutes/day spent sitting compared to those without a university degree, 95 % CrI: 10, 100) after adjustment for potential correlates observed in univariate analyses (sex, age, job status, waist circumference, depressed mood, steps). Correlation between sitting and steps, adjusted for age and sex, was -0.144 (95 % CI: -0.280, 0.002).

Conclusion: There was low correlation between sitting time and step counts. Therefore, high sitting time and low step counts are behaviours that may need to be independently targeted. Interventions to reduce sitting time in adults with type 2 diabetes may need to target non-immigrants and those with a university degree.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus