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Civic Competence of Youth in Europe: Measuring Cross National Variation Through the Creation of a Composite Indicator.

Hoskins B, Saisana M, Villalba CM - Soc Indic Res (2014)

Bottom Line: The results indicate that social justice values and citizenship knowledge and skills of students are facilitated within the Nordic system that combines a stable democracy and economic prosperity with a democratically based education systems in which teachers prioritise promoting autonomous critical thinking in citizenship education.In contrast, medium term democracies with civic republican tradition, such as Italy and Greece gain more positive results on citizenship values and participatory attitudes.In a final step we go on to argue that the Nordic teachers' priority on developing critical and autonomous citizens perhaps facilitates 14 years olds qualities of cognition on citizenship and the values of equality but may not be the most fruitful approach to enhance participatory attitudes or concepts of a good citizen which may be better supported by the Italian teachers' priority on civic responsibility.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Social Sciences, Roehampton University, London, UK.

ABSTRACT

This article develops a composite indicator to monitor the levels of civic competence of young people in Europe using the IEA ICCS 2009 study. The measurement model combines the traditions in Europe of liberal, civic republican and critical/cosmopolitan models of citizenship. The results indicate that social justice values and citizenship knowledge and skills of students are facilitated within the Nordic system that combines a stable democracy and economic prosperity with a democratically based education systems in which teachers prioritise promoting autonomous critical thinking in citizenship education. In contrast, medium term democracies with civic republican tradition, such as Italy and Greece gain more positive results on citizenship values and participatory attitudes. This is also the case for some recent former communist countries that retain ethnic notions of citizenship. In a final step we go on to argue that the Nordic teachers' priority on developing critical and autonomous citizens perhaps facilitates 14 years olds qualities of cognition on citizenship and the values of equality but may not be the most fruitful approach to enhance participatory attitudes or concepts of a good citizen which may be better supported by the Italian teachers' priority on civic responsibility.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Civic competence: average country scores (with confidence intervals). Note confidence intervals are calculated at 95 % level based on a multi-comparison test
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Fig4: Civic competence: average country scores (with confidence intervals). Note confidence intervals are calculated at 95 % level based on a multi-comparison test

Mentions: This section begins with results for the overall composite indicator for the 16 countries, followed by the results for the four dimensions of the composite. Country differences across the single composite and the four dimensions of civic competence have been compared using a multiple comparison test (based on information from a balanced, one-way analysis of variance) that compares country means simultaneously, not just in pairs (Searle et al. 1980; Hochberg and Tamhane 1987; Goldstein and Healy 1995). These results are presented as plots in Figs. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8; for each country a confidence interval around its average score was calculated. By checking the overlap of the confidence intervals, one can evaluate statistical significance (here done at the 95 % level). If the intervals overlap, the difference is not significant; if there is no overlap between the intervals the average country scores differ significantly.Fig. 4


Civic Competence of Youth in Europe: Measuring Cross National Variation Through the Creation of a Composite Indicator.

Hoskins B, Saisana M, Villalba CM - Soc Indic Res (2014)

Civic competence: average country scores (with confidence intervals). Note confidence intervals are calculated at 95 % level based on a multi-comparison test
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4541712&req=5

Fig4: Civic competence: average country scores (with confidence intervals). Note confidence intervals are calculated at 95 % level based on a multi-comparison test
Mentions: This section begins with results for the overall composite indicator for the 16 countries, followed by the results for the four dimensions of the composite. Country differences across the single composite and the four dimensions of civic competence have been compared using a multiple comparison test (based on information from a balanced, one-way analysis of variance) that compares country means simultaneously, not just in pairs (Searle et al. 1980; Hochberg and Tamhane 1987; Goldstein and Healy 1995). These results are presented as plots in Figs. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8; for each country a confidence interval around its average score was calculated. By checking the overlap of the confidence intervals, one can evaluate statistical significance (here done at the 95 % level). If the intervals overlap, the difference is not significant; if there is no overlap between the intervals the average country scores differ significantly.Fig. 4

Bottom Line: The results indicate that social justice values and citizenship knowledge and skills of students are facilitated within the Nordic system that combines a stable democracy and economic prosperity with a democratically based education systems in which teachers prioritise promoting autonomous critical thinking in citizenship education.In contrast, medium term democracies with civic republican tradition, such as Italy and Greece gain more positive results on citizenship values and participatory attitudes.In a final step we go on to argue that the Nordic teachers' priority on developing critical and autonomous citizens perhaps facilitates 14 years olds qualities of cognition on citizenship and the values of equality but may not be the most fruitful approach to enhance participatory attitudes or concepts of a good citizen which may be better supported by the Italian teachers' priority on civic responsibility.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Social Sciences, Roehampton University, London, UK.

ABSTRACT

This article develops a composite indicator to monitor the levels of civic competence of young people in Europe using the IEA ICCS 2009 study. The measurement model combines the traditions in Europe of liberal, civic republican and critical/cosmopolitan models of citizenship. The results indicate that social justice values and citizenship knowledge and skills of students are facilitated within the Nordic system that combines a stable democracy and economic prosperity with a democratically based education systems in which teachers prioritise promoting autonomous critical thinking in citizenship education. In contrast, medium term democracies with civic republican tradition, such as Italy and Greece gain more positive results on citizenship values and participatory attitudes. This is also the case for some recent former communist countries that retain ethnic notions of citizenship. In a final step we go on to argue that the Nordic teachers' priority on developing critical and autonomous citizens perhaps facilitates 14 years olds qualities of cognition on citizenship and the values of equality but may not be the most fruitful approach to enhance participatory attitudes or concepts of a good citizen which may be better supported by the Italian teachers' priority on civic responsibility.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus