Limits...
Monocyte-Derived Suppressor Cells in Transplantation.

Ochando J, Conde P, Bronte V - Curr Transplant Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are cells of myeloid origin with enhanced suppressive function.They are negative regulators of the immune responses and comprise a heterogeneous mixture of immunosuppressive cells of monocytic (M-MDSC) and granulocytic (G-MDSC) origin.A more recent nomenclature proposes the term "suppressive monocyte derived cells" (suppressive MCs) to define CSF1/CSF2-dependent mouse suppressor cells that develop from common monocyte progenitors (cMoPs) after birth.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, USA.

ABSTRACT

Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are cells of myeloid origin with enhanced suppressive function. They are negative regulators of the immune responses and comprise a heterogeneous mixture of immunosuppressive cells of monocytic (M-MDSC) and granulocytic (G-MDSC) origin. A more recent nomenclature proposes the term "suppressive monocyte derived cells" (suppressive MCs) to define CSF1/CSF2-dependent mouse suppressor cells that develop from common monocyte progenitors (cMoPs) after birth. Here, we review the literature about monocytic-derived cells with demonstrated suppressor function in vitro and in vivo within the context of solid organ transplantation.

No MeSH data available.


Monocyte-derived suppressor cells in transplantation. The figure summarizes induction therapies and mechanisms of action of monocyte-derived suppressor cells in organ transplantation. GR glucocorticoid receptor, PR phagocytic receptor, TLI/ALS total lymphoid irradiation/anti-thymocyte serum
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4541698&req=5

Fig1: Monocyte-derived suppressor cells in transplantation. The figure summarizes induction therapies and mechanisms of action of monocyte-derived suppressor cells in organ transplantation. GR glucocorticoid receptor, PR phagocytic receptor, TLI/ALS total lymphoid irradiation/anti-thymocyte serum

Mentions: One of the major goals in solid organ transplantation is the induction of long-term allograft survival in a mature immune system that is free from chronic rejection and lifelong treatment with immunosuppressive drugs and their side effects. The use of MDSC in transplantation therapy is moving forward, and current literature indicates that MDSC favor allograft tolerance in many ways (Fig. 1 highlights MDSC-dependent suppressive mechanisms that mediate graft survival). MDSC suppress inflammation and promote tissue repair in the allografts, exert immunosuppressive effects by secreting anti-inflammatory mediators, and induce alloantigen-specific Tregs, anergizing, and/or depleting recipient effector T cells. However, the complexity of the in vivo myeloid system in solid organ transplantation that regulates the immune response during strong sterile inflammatory conditions due to ischemia reperfusion injury of the donor organ and surgical anastomosis in the recipient makes it difficult to determine the specific mechanisms by which myeloid-derived subsets exert their inhibitory function. The original MDSC terminology includes multiple cell subsets as myelopoiesis refers to the differentiation of a myeloid progenitor into granulocytes, macrophages, mast cells, and dendritic cells. Myeloid cell subsets have been historically proposed based on morphology, cytochemistry, and flow cytometry, but the latest technological revolution in deep-sequencing, mass cytometry, and fate mapping experiments in vivo will enable us to classify myeloid cell subsets more appropriately. Using some of these novel approaches, Guilliams and collaborators have proposed the term monocyte-derived suppressive cells [2]. This recent classification may be more comprehensive in solid organ transplantation as it would include seminal studies from different laboratories that investigated the suppressive function of monocyte-derived cells. Hutchinson and colleagues reported the therapeutic potential of regulatory macrophages in human kidney transplant recipients and cardiac allograft transplanted mice ([54•], [55••]), and Burlingham and colleagues reported graft survival prolongation using Lacto-N-fucopentaose III activated macrophages [56]. On the other hand, and in contrast to G-MDSC depletional studies in tumor bearing mice [57], we demonstrated that depletion of Ly6G expressing granulocytic cells (clone A18) had no effect in tolerance, suggesting that only monocyte-derived cells are responsible for the induction of indefinite allograft survival in solid organ transplantation. In conclusion, clarification on how suppressive cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system are classified, consensus on which markers should be used for subset identification, and unified guidelines to characterize future suppressive cell subsets in solid organ transplantation is urgently needed.Fig. 1


Monocyte-Derived Suppressor Cells in Transplantation.

Ochando J, Conde P, Bronte V - Curr Transplant Rep (2015)

Monocyte-derived suppressor cells in transplantation. The figure summarizes induction therapies and mechanisms of action of monocyte-derived suppressor cells in organ transplantation. GR glucocorticoid receptor, PR phagocytic receptor, TLI/ALS total lymphoid irradiation/anti-thymocyte serum
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4541698&req=5

Fig1: Monocyte-derived suppressor cells in transplantation. The figure summarizes induction therapies and mechanisms of action of monocyte-derived suppressor cells in organ transplantation. GR glucocorticoid receptor, PR phagocytic receptor, TLI/ALS total lymphoid irradiation/anti-thymocyte serum
Mentions: One of the major goals in solid organ transplantation is the induction of long-term allograft survival in a mature immune system that is free from chronic rejection and lifelong treatment with immunosuppressive drugs and their side effects. The use of MDSC in transplantation therapy is moving forward, and current literature indicates that MDSC favor allograft tolerance in many ways (Fig. 1 highlights MDSC-dependent suppressive mechanisms that mediate graft survival). MDSC suppress inflammation and promote tissue repair in the allografts, exert immunosuppressive effects by secreting anti-inflammatory mediators, and induce alloantigen-specific Tregs, anergizing, and/or depleting recipient effector T cells. However, the complexity of the in vivo myeloid system in solid organ transplantation that regulates the immune response during strong sterile inflammatory conditions due to ischemia reperfusion injury of the donor organ and surgical anastomosis in the recipient makes it difficult to determine the specific mechanisms by which myeloid-derived subsets exert their inhibitory function. The original MDSC terminology includes multiple cell subsets as myelopoiesis refers to the differentiation of a myeloid progenitor into granulocytes, macrophages, mast cells, and dendritic cells. Myeloid cell subsets have been historically proposed based on morphology, cytochemistry, and flow cytometry, but the latest technological revolution in deep-sequencing, mass cytometry, and fate mapping experiments in vivo will enable us to classify myeloid cell subsets more appropriately. Using some of these novel approaches, Guilliams and collaborators have proposed the term monocyte-derived suppressive cells [2]. This recent classification may be more comprehensive in solid organ transplantation as it would include seminal studies from different laboratories that investigated the suppressive function of monocyte-derived cells. Hutchinson and colleagues reported the therapeutic potential of regulatory macrophages in human kidney transplant recipients and cardiac allograft transplanted mice ([54•], [55••]), and Burlingham and colleagues reported graft survival prolongation using Lacto-N-fucopentaose III activated macrophages [56]. On the other hand, and in contrast to G-MDSC depletional studies in tumor bearing mice [57], we demonstrated that depletion of Ly6G expressing granulocytic cells (clone A18) had no effect in tolerance, suggesting that only monocyte-derived cells are responsible for the induction of indefinite allograft survival in solid organ transplantation. In conclusion, clarification on how suppressive cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system are classified, consensus on which markers should be used for subset identification, and unified guidelines to characterize future suppressive cell subsets in solid organ transplantation is urgently needed.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are cells of myeloid origin with enhanced suppressive function.They are negative regulators of the immune responses and comprise a heterogeneous mixture of immunosuppressive cells of monocytic (M-MDSC) and granulocytic (G-MDSC) origin.A more recent nomenclature proposes the term "suppressive monocyte derived cells" (suppressive MCs) to define CSF1/CSF2-dependent mouse suppressor cells that develop from common monocyte progenitors (cMoPs) after birth.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, USA.

ABSTRACT

Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are cells of myeloid origin with enhanced suppressive function. They are negative regulators of the immune responses and comprise a heterogeneous mixture of immunosuppressive cells of monocytic (M-MDSC) and granulocytic (G-MDSC) origin. A more recent nomenclature proposes the term "suppressive monocyte derived cells" (suppressive MCs) to define CSF1/CSF2-dependent mouse suppressor cells that develop from common monocyte progenitors (cMoPs) after birth. Here, we review the literature about monocytic-derived cells with demonstrated suppressor function in vitro and in vivo within the context of solid organ transplantation.

No MeSH data available.