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Association of body mass index with disease severity and prognosis in patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

Qi Q, Li T, Li JC, Li Y - Braz. J. Med. Biol. Res. (2015)

Bottom Line: BMI was a significant predictor of hospitalization risk independent of relevant covariates.Survival rates decreased with decreasing BMI (χ2=35.16, P<0.001).BMI was a major determinant of hospitalization and death risks.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Respirology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Shandong Province, Jinan, China.

ABSTRACT
The objective of this observational, multicenter study was to evaluate the association of body mass index (BMI) with disease severity and prognosis in patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. A total of 339 patients (197 females, 142 males) diagnosed with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis by high-resolution computed tomography were classified into four groups: underweight (BMI<18.5 kg/m2), normal weight (18.5≤BMI<25.0 kg/m2), overweight (25.0≤BMI<30.0 kg/m2), and obese (BMI≥30.0 kg/m2). Clinical variables expressing disease severity were recorded, and acute exacerbations, hospitalizations, and survival rates were estimated during the follow-up period. The mean BMI was 21.90 kg/m2. The underweight group comprised 28.61% of all patients. BMI was negatively correlated with acute exacerbations, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, radiographic extent of bronchiectasis, and chronic colonization by P. aeruginosa and positively correlated with pulmonary function indices. BMI was a significant predictor of hospitalization risk independent of relevant covariates. The 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-year cumulative survival rates were 94%, 86%, 81%, and 73%, respectively. Survival rates decreased with decreasing BMI (χ2=35.16, P<0.001). The arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure, inspiratory capacity, age, BMI, and predicted percentage of forced expiratory volume in 1 s independently predicted survival in the Cox proportional hazard model. In conclusion, an underweight status was highly prevalent among patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. Patients with a lower BMI were prone to developing more acute exacerbations, worse pulmonary function, amplified systemic inflammation, and chronic colonization by P. aeruginosa. BMI was a major determinant of hospitalization and death risks. BMI should be considered in the routine assessment of patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Differences in the cumulative survival curves among the four groups. Thecumulative survival curves were statistically different among the four groupsaccording to the log-rank test (χ2=31.67, P<0.001). Mortalitygradually increased as BMI decreased according to a trend test(χ2=35.16, P<0.001).
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f01: Differences in the cumulative survival curves among the four groups. Thecumulative survival curves were statistically different among the four groupsaccording to the log-rank test (χ2=31.67, P<0.001). Mortalitygradually increased as BMI decreased according to a trend test(χ2=35.16, P<0.001).

Mentions: The minimum and maximum follow-up times were 2 and 51 months, respectively. Survivalwas recorded during a follow-up of 21.70±12.38 months. Forty-three patients died, andall died of respiratory and circulatory failure. The 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-yearcumulative survival rates were 94%, 86%, 81%, and 73%, respectively. As shown inFigure 1, the cumulative survival curveswere statistically different among the four groups (χ2=31.67, P<0.001),and the underweight group had the lowest cumulative survival rate. Moreover, themortality rate increased gradually as the BMI decreased according to a trend test(χ2=35.16, P<0.001).


Association of body mass index with disease severity and prognosis in patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

Qi Q, Li T, Li JC, Li Y - Braz. J. Med. Biol. Res. (2015)

Differences in the cumulative survival curves among the four groups. Thecumulative survival curves were statistically different among the four groupsaccording to the log-rank test (χ2=31.67, P<0.001). Mortalitygradually increased as BMI decreased according to a trend test(χ2=35.16, P<0.001).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4541691&req=5

f01: Differences in the cumulative survival curves among the four groups. Thecumulative survival curves were statistically different among the four groupsaccording to the log-rank test (χ2=31.67, P<0.001). Mortalitygradually increased as BMI decreased according to a trend test(χ2=35.16, P<0.001).
Mentions: The minimum and maximum follow-up times were 2 and 51 months, respectively. Survivalwas recorded during a follow-up of 21.70±12.38 months. Forty-three patients died, andall died of respiratory and circulatory failure. The 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-yearcumulative survival rates were 94%, 86%, 81%, and 73%, respectively. As shown inFigure 1, the cumulative survival curveswere statistically different among the four groups (χ2=31.67, P<0.001),and the underweight group had the lowest cumulative survival rate. Moreover, themortality rate increased gradually as the BMI decreased according to a trend test(χ2=35.16, P<0.001).

Bottom Line: BMI was a significant predictor of hospitalization risk independent of relevant covariates.Survival rates decreased with decreasing BMI (χ2=35.16, P<0.001).BMI was a major determinant of hospitalization and death risks.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Respirology, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Shandong Province, Jinan, China.

ABSTRACT
The objective of this observational, multicenter study was to evaluate the association of body mass index (BMI) with disease severity and prognosis in patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. A total of 339 patients (197 females, 142 males) diagnosed with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis by high-resolution computed tomography were classified into four groups: underweight (BMI<18.5 kg/m2), normal weight (18.5≤BMI<25.0 kg/m2), overweight (25.0≤BMI<30.0 kg/m2), and obese (BMI≥30.0 kg/m2). Clinical variables expressing disease severity were recorded, and acute exacerbations, hospitalizations, and survival rates were estimated during the follow-up period. The mean BMI was 21.90 kg/m2. The underweight group comprised 28.61% of all patients. BMI was negatively correlated with acute exacerbations, C-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, radiographic extent of bronchiectasis, and chronic colonization by P. aeruginosa and positively correlated with pulmonary function indices. BMI was a significant predictor of hospitalization risk independent of relevant covariates. The 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-year cumulative survival rates were 94%, 86%, 81%, and 73%, respectively. Survival rates decreased with decreasing BMI (χ2=35.16, P<0.001). The arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure, inspiratory capacity, age, BMI, and predicted percentage of forced expiratory volume in 1 s independently predicted survival in the Cox proportional hazard model. In conclusion, an underweight status was highly prevalent among patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis. Patients with a lower BMI were prone to developing more acute exacerbations, worse pulmonary function, amplified systemic inflammation, and chronic colonization by P. aeruginosa. BMI was a major determinant of hospitalization and death risks. BMI should be considered in the routine assessment of patients with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus