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Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency in Korean Children Presenting with Nonspecific Lower-Extremity Pain.

Park MJ, Lee J, Lee JK, Joo SY - Yonsei Med. J. (2015)

Bottom Line: Serum 25-(OH)D levels were <10 ng/mL in 5.7% of patients, 10 to <20 ng/mL in 51.4%, 20 to <30 ng/mL in 37.9%, and ≥30 ng/mL in only 5.0%.Most patients visited the hospital in the winter (41.4%) (summer, 12.9%), and serum 25-(OH)D levels were also lowest in the winter (17.2±5.5 ng/mL).This study found a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency in Korean children with nonspecific lower-extremity pains, indicating a positive association between vitamin D deficiency and growing pains.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedic Surgery, National Health Insurance Service Ilsan Hospital, Goyang, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Although interest in the role played by vitamin D in bone health is increasing, little is known about the role of this vitamin in musculoskeletal pain in children. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in children presenting with nonspecific lower extremity pains.

Materials and methods: From 2011 to 2012, 183 children underwent evaluation for nonspecific lower-extremity pains. Patients with valid causes, such as fractures or transient synovitis, were excluded, as were those with underlying medical conditions, such as cerebral palsy and metabolic disease. Ultimately, 140 patients met the inclusion criteria. Levels of serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25-(OH)D], the ideal indicator of vitamin D status, were measured in these children.

Results: Eighty-seven boys (62.1%) and 53 girls (37.9%) were included. The mean age at presentation was 5.2 years (range, 2-15). Serum 25-(OH)D levels were <10 ng/mL in 5.7% of patients, 10 to <20 ng/mL in 51.4%, 20 to <30 ng/mL in 37.9%, and ≥30 ng/mL in only 5.0%. Most patients visited the hospital in the winter (41.4%) (summer, 12.9%), and serum 25-(OH)D levels were also lowest in the winter (17.2±5.5 ng/mL).

Conclusion: This study found a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency in Korean children with nonspecific lower-extremity pains, indicating a positive association between vitamin D deficiency and growing pains. More attention should be directed toward vitamin D and its role in the optimization of bone health.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Levels of serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D according to sex and season.
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Figure 2: Levels of serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D according to sex and season.

Mentions: The average serum 25-(OH)D level was lowest in the winter (17.2±5.5 ng/mL) and highest in the fall (22.7±8.4 ng/mL) (Fig. 2). Among the 58 patients who presented with growing pains in winter, 5 (8.6%) had serum 25-(OH)D levels <10 ng/mL, 39 (67.2%) had levels between 10 and 20 ng/mL, 14 (24.1%) had levels between 20 and 30 ng/mL, and no patient had a serum level >30 ng/mL. In contrast, among 18 patients who visited in the summer, 2 patients (11.1%) had serum 25-(OH)D levels >30 ng/mL, 8 patients (44.4%) had levels between 20 and 30 ng/mL, 8 patients (44.4%) had 25-(OH)D levels between 10 and 20 ng/mL, and no patient had a level <10 ng/mL (Fig. 3).


Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency in Korean Children Presenting with Nonspecific Lower-Extremity Pain.

Park MJ, Lee J, Lee JK, Joo SY - Yonsei Med. J. (2015)

Levels of serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D according to sex and season.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4541671&req=5

Figure 2: Levels of serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D according to sex and season.
Mentions: The average serum 25-(OH)D level was lowest in the winter (17.2±5.5 ng/mL) and highest in the fall (22.7±8.4 ng/mL) (Fig. 2). Among the 58 patients who presented with growing pains in winter, 5 (8.6%) had serum 25-(OH)D levels <10 ng/mL, 39 (67.2%) had levels between 10 and 20 ng/mL, 14 (24.1%) had levels between 20 and 30 ng/mL, and no patient had a serum level >30 ng/mL. In contrast, among 18 patients who visited in the summer, 2 patients (11.1%) had serum 25-(OH)D levels >30 ng/mL, 8 patients (44.4%) had levels between 20 and 30 ng/mL, 8 patients (44.4%) had 25-(OH)D levels between 10 and 20 ng/mL, and no patient had a level <10 ng/mL (Fig. 3).

Bottom Line: Serum 25-(OH)D levels were <10 ng/mL in 5.7% of patients, 10 to <20 ng/mL in 51.4%, 20 to <30 ng/mL in 37.9%, and ≥30 ng/mL in only 5.0%.Most patients visited the hospital in the winter (41.4%) (summer, 12.9%), and serum 25-(OH)D levels were also lowest in the winter (17.2±5.5 ng/mL).This study found a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency in Korean children with nonspecific lower-extremity pains, indicating a positive association between vitamin D deficiency and growing pains.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedic Surgery, National Health Insurance Service Ilsan Hospital, Goyang, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Although interest in the role played by vitamin D in bone health is increasing, little is known about the role of this vitamin in musculoskeletal pain in children. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in children presenting with nonspecific lower extremity pains.

Materials and methods: From 2011 to 2012, 183 children underwent evaluation for nonspecific lower-extremity pains. Patients with valid causes, such as fractures or transient synovitis, were excluded, as were those with underlying medical conditions, such as cerebral palsy and metabolic disease. Ultimately, 140 patients met the inclusion criteria. Levels of serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25-(OH)D], the ideal indicator of vitamin D status, were measured in these children.

Results: Eighty-seven boys (62.1%) and 53 girls (37.9%) were included. The mean age at presentation was 5.2 years (range, 2-15). Serum 25-(OH)D levels were <10 ng/mL in 5.7% of patients, 10 to <20 ng/mL in 51.4%, 20 to <30 ng/mL in 37.9%, and ≥30 ng/mL in only 5.0%. Most patients visited the hospital in the winter (41.4%) (summer, 12.9%), and serum 25-(OH)D levels were also lowest in the winter (17.2±5.5 ng/mL).

Conclusion: This study found a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency in Korean children with nonspecific lower-extremity pains, indicating a positive association between vitamin D deficiency and growing pains. More attention should be directed toward vitamin D and its role in the optimization of bone health.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus