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Commentary on gender differences in prevalence, treatment, and quality of life of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis.

Ference EH, Tan BK, Hulse KE, Chandra RK, Smith SB, Kern RC, Conley DB, Smith SS - Allergy Rhinol (Providence) (2015)

Bottom Line: Furthermore, migraine headaches, which are more common among women, may be misdiagnosed as CRS, which contributes to gender differences in the prevalence of CRS.The degree to which reported differences in prevalence and health utilization represent biologic or physiologic differences between genders is not known; however, differences in anatomic size, tobacco susceptibility, and hormonal factors have been speculated to increase the overall susceptibility to CRS in women compared with men.Focused research that examines the effect of gender on the development, treatment, and outcomes of CRS is warranted.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois,, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To examine the existing evidence on gender differences in the prevalence, treatment, and quality of life of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS).

Methods: Review of the literature and expert opinion.

Results: From a sociologic standpoint, women have historically been considered more likely to report symptoms, seek medical care, and give poorer self-evaluation of health, which may bias data toward increased prevalence and a greater effect of CRS on quality of life in women. However, the influence of gender seems to be restricted primarily to the evaluation of general quality of life, whereas the disease-specific health-related quality of life is not different between genders. Furthermore, migraine headaches, which are more common among women, may be misdiagnosed as CRS, which contributes to gender differences in the prevalence of CRS. The degree to which reported differences in prevalence and health utilization represent biologic or physiologic differences between genders is not known; however, differences in anatomic size, tobacco susceptibility, and hormonal factors have been speculated to increase the overall susceptibility to CRS in women compared with men.

Conclusions: Focused research that examines the effect of gender on the development, treatment, and outcomes of CRS is warranted.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison between gender and age at time of functional endoscopic sinus surgery in California, Florida, Maryland, and New York Ambulatory Surgery Centers in 2011. Women, median age 48.1 years; men, median age, 49.6 years; p < 0.001, Wilcoxon rank sum test.
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Figure 1: Comparison between gender and age at time of functional endoscopic sinus surgery in California, Florida, Maryland, and New York Ambulatory Surgery Centers in 2011. Women, median age 48.1 years; men, median age, 49.6 years; p < 0.001, Wilcoxon rank sum test.

Mentions: Gender-specific differences in the prevalence of CRS may also be due to decisions to seek medical care. Because the diagnosis of CRS is heavily dependent on patient reported symptoms, differential rates of pursuing medical care and differences in symptom reporting may play a role in the observed prevalence difference of CRS. Women tend to account for a higher percentage of claims (72%)21 and office visits for acute rhinosinusitis (ARS) (66%)22 and CRS (60%),23 but males tend to develop complications from ARS more frequently than females.24,25 Our own unpublished analysis of the State Ambulatory Surgery Databases, Health Care Cost and Utilization Project, Agency of Health Care Research and Quality shows that, among the 33,000 patients in California, Florida, Maryland, and New York, in 2011, who underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery, women were ∼1.5 years younger on average compared with men (Fig. 1) (women, 48.1 years; men, 49.6 years; p < 0.001).26 The difference in complications of ARS and in age at the time of surgery may be due to a delay in men seeking medical care, but further research is necessary to explore this hypothesis.


Commentary on gender differences in prevalence, treatment, and quality of life of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis.

Ference EH, Tan BK, Hulse KE, Chandra RK, Smith SB, Kern RC, Conley DB, Smith SS - Allergy Rhinol (Providence) (2015)

Comparison between gender and age at time of functional endoscopic sinus surgery in California, Florida, Maryland, and New York Ambulatory Surgery Centers in 2011. Women, median age 48.1 years; men, median age, 49.6 years; p < 0.001, Wilcoxon rank sum test.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4541639&req=5

Figure 1: Comparison between gender and age at time of functional endoscopic sinus surgery in California, Florida, Maryland, and New York Ambulatory Surgery Centers in 2011. Women, median age 48.1 years; men, median age, 49.6 years; p < 0.001, Wilcoxon rank sum test.
Mentions: Gender-specific differences in the prevalence of CRS may also be due to decisions to seek medical care. Because the diagnosis of CRS is heavily dependent on patient reported symptoms, differential rates of pursuing medical care and differences in symptom reporting may play a role in the observed prevalence difference of CRS. Women tend to account for a higher percentage of claims (72%)21 and office visits for acute rhinosinusitis (ARS) (66%)22 and CRS (60%),23 but males tend to develop complications from ARS more frequently than females.24,25 Our own unpublished analysis of the State Ambulatory Surgery Databases, Health Care Cost and Utilization Project, Agency of Health Care Research and Quality shows that, among the 33,000 patients in California, Florida, Maryland, and New York, in 2011, who underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery, women were ∼1.5 years younger on average compared with men (Fig. 1) (women, 48.1 years; men, 49.6 years; p < 0.001).26 The difference in complications of ARS and in age at the time of surgery may be due to a delay in men seeking medical care, but further research is necessary to explore this hypothesis.

Bottom Line: Furthermore, migraine headaches, which are more common among women, may be misdiagnosed as CRS, which contributes to gender differences in the prevalence of CRS.The degree to which reported differences in prevalence and health utilization represent biologic or physiologic differences between genders is not known; however, differences in anatomic size, tobacco susceptibility, and hormonal factors have been speculated to increase the overall susceptibility to CRS in women compared with men.Focused research that examines the effect of gender on the development, treatment, and outcomes of CRS is warranted.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois,, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To examine the existing evidence on gender differences in the prevalence, treatment, and quality of life of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS).

Methods: Review of the literature and expert opinion.

Results: From a sociologic standpoint, women have historically been considered more likely to report symptoms, seek medical care, and give poorer self-evaluation of health, which may bias data toward increased prevalence and a greater effect of CRS on quality of life in women. However, the influence of gender seems to be restricted primarily to the evaluation of general quality of life, whereas the disease-specific health-related quality of life is not different between genders. Furthermore, migraine headaches, which are more common among women, may be misdiagnosed as CRS, which contributes to gender differences in the prevalence of CRS. The degree to which reported differences in prevalence and health utilization represent biologic or physiologic differences between genders is not known; however, differences in anatomic size, tobacco susceptibility, and hormonal factors have been speculated to increase the overall susceptibility to CRS in women compared with men.

Conclusions: Focused research that examines the effect of gender on the development, treatment, and outcomes of CRS is warranted.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus