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"I tried so many diets, now I want to do it differently" - A single case study on coaching for weight loss.

Stelter R - Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being (2015)

Bottom Line: The client was a well-educated woman in her late 30s, who had tried many different forms of dieting over the years-with little and no lasting effect.Finally, an intra-active model-viewing the client as a self-reflective individual-was used as theoretical basis.The data material was based on audio recordings of selected sessions, notes written by the coach from every session, and final written reflections by the coachee.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen N, Denmark; rstelter@nexs.ku.dk.

ABSTRACT
In this single case study, the author presented an in-depth description and analysis of a coaching intervention with focus on weight loss, conducted over 10 sessions in the course of 17 months. The client was a well-educated woman in her late 30s, who had tried many different forms of dieting over the years-with little and no lasting effect. In his coaching approach, the author went beyond a pure behavioural change model, that is, based on the Health Belief Model, and tried to take a whole-life perspective, where the client learned to link specific events and habits in her work life and everyday life with specific eating habits. In their collaborative practice, coach and coachee initiated changes both in regard to diet, physical activity, and healthy life style, in general. In a theoretical section, the change in understanding with regard to overeating was presented. Finally, an intra-active model-viewing the client as a self-reflective individual-was used as theoretical basis. A narrative analysis of the first session and a cross-session examination was presented to show, analyse, and understand the procedure of the coaching approach. Finally, the voice of the coachee was heard in regard to her personal experiences during the process. The data material was based on audio recordings of selected sessions, notes written by the coach from every session, and final written reflections by the coachee.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The intra-active individual.
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Figure 0001: The intra-active individual.

Mentions: On the basis of this intra-active model of the self, Ogden (2002) described the change in regard to the understanding of dieting as follows. In the 1960s and 1970s, the psychological understanding of overeating was influenced by the idea that overweight and obesity were highly and sometimes uncontrollably responsive to external and environmental cues such as time of day, sight, number and salience of food cues, and taste (Schachter, 1968; Schachter & Gross, 1968). In the last quarter of the twentieth century, new models emerged. Ogden (2002, p. 87) referred to studies conducted with normal weight individuals, studies which “suggested that trying to eat less (i.e., restrained eating) was a better predictor of food intake than weight per se.” A theory of restrained eating behaviour evolved. The perception of weight, a biological construct, was no longer seen as the main determinant of eating behaviour. Instead restrained eating, a psychological construct, was introduced as means to evaluate food intake (Herman & Mack, 1975; Hibscher & Herman, 1977). In consequence of this approach, overeating could be characterized as a failure of self-control (Ogden, 1997, 2002); the individual does not manage to keep him- or herself under “proper” surveillance. This led to the development of to an escape theory to explain disinhibition with the consequence of overeating (Heatherton & Baumeister, 1991): Binge and overeating arise as part of a motivated attempt to escape from self-awareness and self-control in situations where one's own high standards and demanding ideals are put under pressure. Eating turns into pure relief for surveillance and becomes self-satisfactory. In a study of Heatherton and Baumeister (1991, p. 101) binge eating was also “associated with decreased negative affect.” On the basis of this understanding, Ogden (2002, p. 89) concluded: “Therefore, a shift to lower self-awareness resulted in reduced self-control”—with the final possible consequence: overeating. Her definition of the individual “as a reflexive, intra-active and self-controlling self, who is not biomedical and not social” (Ogden, 2002, p. 97) was an attempt to overcome the dualism or disintegration between social and environment dimensions on the one side, and individual and psychological dimensions on the other side. With this model, the intention was to merge the individual with social and environmental factors. Individuals become reflexive and intra-active subjects and objects of their own self-reflection (Figure 1). Indubitably, environmental factors have an impact on the individual but not in a simple causal relationship.


"I tried so many diets, now I want to do it differently" - A single case study on coaching for weight loss.

Stelter R - Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being (2015)

The intra-active individual.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4539387&req=5

Figure 0001: The intra-active individual.
Mentions: On the basis of this intra-active model of the self, Ogden (2002) described the change in regard to the understanding of dieting as follows. In the 1960s and 1970s, the psychological understanding of overeating was influenced by the idea that overweight and obesity were highly and sometimes uncontrollably responsive to external and environmental cues such as time of day, sight, number and salience of food cues, and taste (Schachter, 1968; Schachter & Gross, 1968). In the last quarter of the twentieth century, new models emerged. Ogden (2002, p. 87) referred to studies conducted with normal weight individuals, studies which “suggested that trying to eat less (i.e., restrained eating) was a better predictor of food intake than weight per se.” A theory of restrained eating behaviour evolved. The perception of weight, a biological construct, was no longer seen as the main determinant of eating behaviour. Instead restrained eating, a psychological construct, was introduced as means to evaluate food intake (Herman & Mack, 1975; Hibscher & Herman, 1977). In consequence of this approach, overeating could be characterized as a failure of self-control (Ogden, 1997, 2002); the individual does not manage to keep him- or herself under “proper” surveillance. This led to the development of to an escape theory to explain disinhibition with the consequence of overeating (Heatherton & Baumeister, 1991): Binge and overeating arise as part of a motivated attempt to escape from self-awareness and self-control in situations where one's own high standards and demanding ideals are put under pressure. Eating turns into pure relief for surveillance and becomes self-satisfactory. In a study of Heatherton and Baumeister (1991, p. 101) binge eating was also “associated with decreased negative affect.” On the basis of this understanding, Ogden (2002, p. 89) concluded: “Therefore, a shift to lower self-awareness resulted in reduced self-control”—with the final possible consequence: overeating. Her definition of the individual “as a reflexive, intra-active and self-controlling self, who is not biomedical and not social” (Ogden, 2002, p. 97) was an attempt to overcome the dualism or disintegration between social and environment dimensions on the one side, and individual and psychological dimensions on the other side. With this model, the intention was to merge the individual with social and environmental factors. Individuals become reflexive and intra-active subjects and objects of their own self-reflection (Figure 1). Indubitably, environmental factors have an impact on the individual but not in a simple causal relationship.

Bottom Line: The client was a well-educated woman in her late 30s, who had tried many different forms of dieting over the years-with little and no lasting effect.Finally, an intra-active model-viewing the client as a self-reflective individual-was used as theoretical basis.The data material was based on audio recordings of selected sessions, notes written by the coach from every session, and final written reflections by the coachee.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen N, Denmark; rstelter@nexs.ku.dk.

ABSTRACT
In this single case study, the author presented an in-depth description and analysis of a coaching intervention with focus on weight loss, conducted over 10 sessions in the course of 17 months. The client was a well-educated woman in her late 30s, who had tried many different forms of dieting over the years-with little and no lasting effect. In his coaching approach, the author went beyond a pure behavioural change model, that is, based on the Health Belief Model, and tried to take a whole-life perspective, where the client learned to link specific events and habits in her work life and everyday life with specific eating habits. In their collaborative practice, coach and coachee initiated changes both in regard to diet, physical activity, and healthy life style, in general. In a theoretical section, the change in understanding with regard to overeating was presented. Finally, an intra-active model-viewing the client as a self-reflective individual-was used as theoretical basis. A narrative analysis of the first session and a cross-session examination was presented to show, analyse, and understand the procedure of the coaching approach. Finally, the voice of the coachee was heard in regard to her personal experiences during the process. The data material was based on audio recordings of selected sessions, notes written by the coach from every session, and final written reflections by the coachee.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus