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Acceptance of Home-Based Chlamydia Genital and Anorectal Testing Using Short Message Service (SMS) in Previously Tested Young People and Their Social and Sexual Networks.

Dukers-Muijrers NH, Theunissen KA, Wolffs PT, Kok G, Hoebe CJ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Associations with the individual's initial screening result and other factors were explored using logistic regression.Of tested peers (n=87), 84% were friends, 31% were first-time testers, and 7% tested positive.By further including a peer-led testing component, undetected CT positives can be identified in the social networks surrounding a high-risk individual.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Sexual Health, Infectious Diseases and Environmental Health, South Limburg Public Health Service, Geleen, the Netherlands; Department of Medical Microbiology, School of Public Health and Primary Care (CAPHRI), Maastricht University Medical Center + (MUMC+), Maastricht, the Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Background: Control strategies for Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) are most effective when targeting people at highest risk. We assessed test acceptance of home-collection test kits offered by short messaging services (SMS) texts, in high-risk young people, i.e. those who had previously tested CT positive (positive indices), or negative reporting more than 3 sex partners (negative indices), and their sexual and social networks.

Methods: Young (16 to 25 years old) heterosexuals who previously tested positive (n=536) or negative (n=536) in our STI clinic received, 3 to 20 months after their initial screening, an SMS inviting them to re-test. They were offered a free home-collection test kit including a genital (men and women) and anorectal (women only) test, and a test kit to pass on to a friend or sex partner (peer). SMS reminders were sent in case of non-response. We assessed proportions of tests requested and returned, peers tested, and positivity. Associations with the individual's initial screening result and other factors were explored using logistic regression.

Results: Of 1072 people invited to retest, 34.4% (n=369) requested a test. Of these, 55.8% (n=206) retested. Overall, retest participation was higher in positive (22%) than in negative indices (16%) (p<0.001); it was also higher in women and in those aged >22 years. Positivity was 13% and 7% in positive and negative indices, respectively. One in 3 retesters also had a peer tested. Of tested peers (n=87), 84% were friends, 31% were first-time testers, and 7% tested positive.

Conclusion: Acceptance of a relatively low-cost strategy for genital and anorectal testing, i.e. using SMS and home-collection test kits, was highest in individuals who previously tested CT positive suggesting that implementation for this group may be considered. By further including a peer-led testing component, undetected CT positives can be identified in the social networks surrounding a high-risk individual.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Number of test requests and tests by Chlamydia negative and positive indices.
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pone.0133575.g002: Number of test requests and tests by Chlamydia negative and positive indices.

Mentions: In total, 369 (34.4%) of all invited young people requested a test kit, i.e. 29.2% of CT negative indices and a significantly higher 39.9% of positive indices (Table 1 and Fig 2). Other factors found to be independently associated with requesting a test included age (those in the older age bracket requested more tests) and sex (females requested more tests). Of the people who requested a test, the majority (71.3% of CT negative individuals and 76.9% of CT positive individuals) did so after the initial invitation SMS; most within a day. The remainder of those who requested a test responded only after one of the reminder SMS has been sent.


Acceptance of Home-Based Chlamydia Genital and Anorectal Testing Using Short Message Service (SMS) in Previously Tested Young People and Their Social and Sexual Networks.

Dukers-Muijrers NH, Theunissen KA, Wolffs PT, Kok G, Hoebe CJ - PLoS ONE (2015)

Number of test requests and tests by Chlamydia negative and positive indices.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4539363&req=5

pone.0133575.g002: Number of test requests and tests by Chlamydia negative and positive indices.
Mentions: In total, 369 (34.4%) of all invited young people requested a test kit, i.e. 29.2% of CT negative indices and a significantly higher 39.9% of positive indices (Table 1 and Fig 2). Other factors found to be independently associated with requesting a test included age (those in the older age bracket requested more tests) and sex (females requested more tests). Of the people who requested a test, the majority (71.3% of CT negative individuals and 76.9% of CT positive individuals) did so after the initial invitation SMS; most within a day. The remainder of those who requested a test responded only after one of the reminder SMS has been sent.

Bottom Line: Associations with the individual's initial screening result and other factors were explored using logistic regression.Of tested peers (n=87), 84% were friends, 31% were first-time testers, and 7% tested positive.By further including a peer-led testing component, undetected CT positives can be identified in the social networks surrounding a high-risk individual.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Sexual Health, Infectious Diseases and Environmental Health, South Limburg Public Health Service, Geleen, the Netherlands; Department of Medical Microbiology, School of Public Health and Primary Care (CAPHRI), Maastricht University Medical Center + (MUMC+), Maastricht, the Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Background: Control strategies for Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) are most effective when targeting people at highest risk. We assessed test acceptance of home-collection test kits offered by short messaging services (SMS) texts, in high-risk young people, i.e. those who had previously tested CT positive (positive indices), or negative reporting more than 3 sex partners (negative indices), and their sexual and social networks.

Methods: Young (16 to 25 years old) heterosexuals who previously tested positive (n=536) or negative (n=536) in our STI clinic received, 3 to 20 months after their initial screening, an SMS inviting them to re-test. They were offered a free home-collection test kit including a genital (men and women) and anorectal (women only) test, and a test kit to pass on to a friend or sex partner (peer). SMS reminders were sent in case of non-response. We assessed proportions of tests requested and returned, peers tested, and positivity. Associations with the individual's initial screening result and other factors were explored using logistic regression.

Results: Of 1072 people invited to retest, 34.4% (n=369) requested a test. Of these, 55.8% (n=206) retested. Overall, retest participation was higher in positive (22%) than in negative indices (16%) (p<0.001); it was also higher in women and in those aged >22 years. Positivity was 13% and 7% in positive and negative indices, respectively. One in 3 retesters also had a peer tested. Of tested peers (n=87), 84% were friends, 31% were first-time testers, and 7% tested positive.

Conclusion: Acceptance of a relatively low-cost strategy for genital and anorectal testing, i.e. using SMS and home-collection test kits, was highest in individuals who previously tested CT positive suggesting that implementation for this group may be considered. By further including a peer-led testing component, undetected CT positives can be identified in the social networks surrounding a high-risk individual.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus