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Seven key investments for health equity across the lifecourse: Scotland versus the rest of the UK.

Frank J, Bromley C, Doi L, Estrade M, Jepson R, McAteer J, Robertson T, Treanor M, Williams A - Soc Sci Med (2015)

Bottom Line: We present hard-to-find comparable analyses of routinely collected data to gauge the relative extent to which these investments have been pursued and achieved expected goals in Scotland, as compared with England and Wales, in recent decades.Despite Scotland's longstanding explicit goal of reducing health inequalities, it has recently been doing slightly better than England and Wales on only one broad indicator of health-equity-related investments: childhood poverty.Although Scotland did not choose independence on September 18th, 2014, it could still (under the planned increased devolution of powers from Westminster) choose to increase investments in the underperforming categories of interventions for health equity listed above.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research and Policy, University of Edinburgh, EH8 9DX, UK. Electronic address: john.frank@ed.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Unemployment rate by UK region (2008–2015). Source: Labour Market Statistics, ONS (ONS, 2015).
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fig7: Unemployment rate by UK region (2008–2015). Source: Labour Market Statistics, ONS (ONS, 2015).

Mentions: Focussing on unemployment, national data highlight a lack of any substantial difference in unemployment rates between January 2008–March 2015 (which includes the recent UK economic recession) when comparing Scotland with England, Wales and Northern Ireland for those aged 16+ (if anything, Wales has had the highest unemployment levels of the four UK regions) (Fig. 7). The pattern has also been similar for those economically inactive. However, these figures may disguise differences in working patterns across regions (e.g. low pay, part-time jobs, zero-hour contracts, in-work poverty, precariousness), smaller-scale regional differences and period/cohort effects (e.g. Scotland had higher rates of unemployment compared to the UK average in the 1980s during deindustrialisation) (McCartney et al., 2013b). Adult unemployment rates are currently around 6–8%, but youth unemployment (ages 16–24) are much higher, ranging from 11.6% (East Midlands) to 23.3% (North East) in England, with Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland sitting at 13.8%, 21.2% and 21.0%, respectively (January–March 2015) (ONS) (ONS, 2015). This age group is also the only one to have seen continued rises in unemployment figures since 2010 (Aldridge et al., 2013). While a welcome downward trend in unemployment has been seen since late 2013, rates would appear closely linked to macro-level economic conditions (e.g. the global financial crisis) and still remain above those pre-2008.


Seven key investments for health equity across the lifecourse: Scotland versus the rest of the UK.

Frank J, Bromley C, Doi L, Estrade M, Jepson R, McAteer J, Robertson T, Treanor M, Williams A - Soc Sci Med (2015)

Unemployment rate by UK region (2008–2015). Source: Labour Market Statistics, ONS (ONS, 2015).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4539344&req=5

fig7: Unemployment rate by UK region (2008–2015). Source: Labour Market Statistics, ONS (ONS, 2015).
Mentions: Focussing on unemployment, national data highlight a lack of any substantial difference in unemployment rates between January 2008–March 2015 (which includes the recent UK economic recession) when comparing Scotland with England, Wales and Northern Ireland for those aged 16+ (if anything, Wales has had the highest unemployment levels of the four UK regions) (Fig. 7). The pattern has also been similar for those economically inactive. However, these figures may disguise differences in working patterns across regions (e.g. low pay, part-time jobs, zero-hour contracts, in-work poverty, precariousness), smaller-scale regional differences and period/cohort effects (e.g. Scotland had higher rates of unemployment compared to the UK average in the 1980s during deindustrialisation) (McCartney et al., 2013b). Adult unemployment rates are currently around 6–8%, but youth unemployment (ages 16–24) are much higher, ranging from 11.6% (East Midlands) to 23.3% (North East) in England, with Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland sitting at 13.8%, 21.2% and 21.0%, respectively (January–March 2015) (ONS) (ONS, 2015). This age group is also the only one to have seen continued rises in unemployment figures since 2010 (Aldridge et al., 2013). While a welcome downward trend in unemployment has been seen since late 2013, rates would appear closely linked to macro-level economic conditions (e.g. the global financial crisis) and still remain above those pre-2008.

Bottom Line: We present hard-to-find comparable analyses of routinely collected data to gauge the relative extent to which these investments have been pursued and achieved expected goals in Scotland, as compared with England and Wales, in recent decades.Despite Scotland's longstanding explicit goal of reducing health inequalities, it has recently been doing slightly better than England and Wales on only one broad indicator of health-equity-related investments: childhood poverty.Although Scotland did not choose independence on September 18th, 2014, it could still (under the planned increased devolution of powers from Westminster) choose to increase investments in the underperforming categories of interventions for health equity listed above.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research and Policy, University of Edinburgh, EH8 9DX, UK. Electronic address: john.frank@ed.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus