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Seven key investments for health equity across the lifecourse: Scotland versus the rest of the UK.

Frank J, Bromley C, Doi L, Estrade M, Jepson R, McAteer J, Robertson T, Treanor M, Williams A - Soc Sci Med (2015)

Bottom Line: We present hard-to-find comparable analyses of routinely collected data to gauge the relative extent to which these investments have been pursued and achieved expected goals in Scotland, as compared with England and Wales, in recent decades.Despite Scotland's longstanding explicit goal of reducing health inequalities, it has recently been doing slightly better than England and Wales on only one broad indicator of health-equity-related investments: childhood poverty.Although Scotland did not choose independence on September 18th, 2014, it could still (under the planned increased devolution of powers from Westminster) choose to increase investments in the underperforming categories of interventions for health equity listed above.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research and Policy, University of Edinburgh, EH8 9DX, UK. Electronic address: john.frank@ed.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Socioeconomic Gradients in Standardised Literacy Test Scores by Parental Education Level for 12 countries). Note, IALS = International Adult Literacy Survey. Source: Willms, 2003.
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fig5: Socioeconomic Gradients in Standardised Literacy Test Scores by Parental Education Level for 12 countries). Note, IALS = International Adult Literacy Survey. Source: Willms, 2003.

Mentions: There is ample evidence that socioeconomic gradients in educational attainment remain significant across the UK. Analyses of the 2009 PISA data reveal gaps between the scores of children in the top and bottom SEP quartiles are very large (one standard deviation of the entire population distribution). Yet examination of data extending back two decades shows that such SEP differences in educational attainment are not inevitable, in that numerous countries in north-western Europe have achieved much smaller SEP gradients than any part of the UK (Fig. 5) (Willms, 2003). Work from Holland, Finland and Estonia highlights that “levelling the playing field of life” in those countries is largely attributable to the decades-long provision of universally accessible, high-quality preschool education, typically in local neighbourhood centres reachable by any parent, on foot, from their home, all year round (Sinclair, 2007). Data from 2007/08 to 2011/12 have shown that in Scotland “the attainment gap has remained unchanged. Even though overall leaver attainment increased slightly for all socioeconomic groups, the gap between children from the most and least deprived background remained the same”. (Sosu and Ellis, 2014). Similar patterns have been also been seen in England with earlier data (Goodman and Gregg, 2010).


Seven key investments for health equity across the lifecourse: Scotland versus the rest of the UK.

Frank J, Bromley C, Doi L, Estrade M, Jepson R, McAteer J, Robertson T, Treanor M, Williams A - Soc Sci Med (2015)

Socioeconomic Gradients in Standardised Literacy Test Scores by Parental Education Level for 12 countries). Note, IALS = International Adult Literacy Survey. Source: Willms, 2003.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4539344&req=5

fig5: Socioeconomic Gradients in Standardised Literacy Test Scores by Parental Education Level for 12 countries). Note, IALS = International Adult Literacy Survey. Source: Willms, 2003.
Mentions: There is ample evidence that socioeconomic gradients in educational attainment remain significant across the UK. Analyses of the 2009 PISA data reveal gaps between the scores of children in the top and bottom SEP quartiles are very large (one standard deviation of the entire population distribution). Yet examination of data extending back two decades shows that such SEP differences in educational attainment are not inevitable, in that numerous countries in north-western Europe have achieved much smaller SEP gradients than any part of the UK (Fig. 5) (Willms, 2003). Work from Holland, Finland and Estonia highlights that “levelling the playing field of life” in those countries is largely attributable to the decades-long provision of universally accessible, high-quality preschool education, typically in local neighbourhood centres reachable by any parent, on foot, from their home, all year round (Sinclair, 2007). Data from 2007/08 to 2011/12 have shown that in Scotland “the attainment gap has remained unchanged. Even though overall leaver attainment increased slightly for all socioeconomic groups, the gap between children from the most and least deprived background remained the same”. (Sosu and Ellis, 2014). Similar patterns have been also been seen in England with earlier data (Goodman and Gregg, 2010).

Bottom Line: We present hard-to-find comparable analyses of routinely collected data to gauge the relative extent to which these investments have been pursued and achieved expected goals in Scotland, as compared with England and Wales, in recent decades.Despite Scotland's longstanding explicit goal of reducing health inequalities, it has recently been doing slightly better than England and Wales on only one broad indicator of health-equity-related investments: childhood poverty.Although Scotland did not choose independence on September 18th, 2014, it could still (under the planned increased devolution of powers from Westminster) choose to increase investments in the underperforming categories of interventions for health equity listed above.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research and Policy, University of Edinburgh, EH8 9DX, UK. Electronic address: john.frank@ed.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus