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Seven key investments for health equity across the lifecourse: Scotland versus the rest of the UK.

Frank J, Bromley C, Doi L, Estrade M, Jepson R, McAteer J, Robertson T, Treanor M, Williams A - Soc Sci Med (2015)

Bottom Line: We present hard-to-find comparable analyses of routinely collected data to gauge the relative extent to which these investments have been pursued and achieved expected goals in Scotland, as compared with England and Wales, in recent decades.Despite Scotland's longstanding explicit goal of reducing health inequalities, it has recently been doing slightly better than England and Wales on only one broad indicator of health-equity-related investments: childhood poverty.Although Scotland did not choose independence on September 18th, 2014, it could still (under the planned increased devolution of powers from Westminster) choose to increase investments in the underperforming categories of interventions for health equity listed above.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research and Policy, University of Edinburgh, EH8 9DX, UK. Electronic address: john.frank@ed.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentage of children living in households with less than 60 per cent of 2010/11 median household income held constant in real terms, by region and country, United Kingdom (1994/95–2012/13) Percentage of children living in Scottish and English households living in poverty before (BHC) and after (AHC) adjustment for housing costs (1994–2012). Source: Aldridge et al., 2013 (Teenage Pregnancy Independent Advisory Group, 2010).
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fig4: Percentage of children living in households with less than 60 per cent of 2010/11 median household income held constant in real terms, by region and country, United Kingdom (1994/95–2012/13) Percentage of children living in Scottish and English households living in poverty before (BHC) and after (AHC) adjustment for housing costs (1994–2012). Source: Aldridge et al., 2013 (Teenage Pregnancy Independent Advisory Group, 2010).

Mentions: While New Labour did not achieve its ambitious aim to reduce child poverty by 50% by 2010 the trend was heading in the right direction. Since 2010/11, however, due to the UK Coalition government's austerity measures, child poverty has been decreasing in relative terms due to a general fall in income but has been increasing in absolute terms across the entire UK (Fig. 4 – absolute; Supplementary Fig. 5 – relative). This increase in absolute terms is “unprecedented since records began in the 1960s” and marks a worrying reversal in the hitherto improving child poverty trend (Taylor-Robinson et al., 2014). Although Scotland is devolved, policies associated with income, such as minimum wage, tax credits and social security benefits, are reserved to the UK government at Westminster. Despite the Scottish Government's limited room for manoeuvre with regards policy divergence in relation to child poverty, there is a critique that it has had greater room for manoeuvre than it has utilised (Sinclair et al., 2011; Wincott, 2006).


Seven key investments for health equity across the lifecourse: Scotland versus the rest of the UK.

Frank J, Bromley C, Doi L, Estrade M, Jepson R, McAteer J, Robertson T, Treanor M, Williams A - Soc Sci Med (2015)

Percentage of children living in households with less than 60 per cent of 2010/11 median household income held constant in real terms, by region and country, United Kingdom (1994/95–2012/13) Percentage of children living in Scottish and English households living in poverty before (BHC) and after (AHC) adjustment for housing costs (1994–2012). Source: Aldridge et al., 2013 (Teenage Pregnancy Independent Advisory Group, 2010).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4539344&req=5

fig4: Percentage of children living in households with less than 60 per cent of 2010/11 median household income held constant in real terms, by region and country, United Kingdom (1994/95–2012/13) Percentage of children living in Scottish and English households living in poverty before (BHC) and after (AHC) adjustment for housing costs (1994–2012). Source: Aldridge et al., 2013 (Teenage Pregnancy Independent Advisory Group, 2010).
Mentions: While New Labour did not achieve its ambitious aim to reduce child poverty by 50% by 2010 the trend was heading in the right direction. Since 2010/11, however, due to the UK Coalition government's austerity measures, child poverty has been decreasing in relative terms due to a general fall in income but has been increasing in absolute terms across the entire UK (Fig. 4 – absolute; Supplementary Fig. 5 – relative). This increase in absolute terms is “unprecedented since records began in the 1960s” and marks a worrying reversal in the hitherto improving child poverty trend (Taylor-Robinson et al., 2014). Although Scotland is devolved, policies associated with income, such as minimum wage, tax credits and social security benefits, are reserved to the UK government at Westminster. Despite the Scottish Government's limited room for manoeuvre with regards policy divergence in relation to child poverty, there is a critique that it has had greater room for manoeuvre than it has utilised (Sinclair et al., 2011; Wincott, 2006).

Bottom Line: We present hard-to-find comparable analyses of routinely collected data to gauge the relative extent to which these investments have been pursued and achieved expected goals in Scotland, as compared with England and Wales, in recent decades.Despite Scotland's longstanding explicit goal of reducing health inequalities, it has recently been doing slightly better than England and Wales on only one broad indicator of health-equity-related investments: childhood poverty.Although Scotland did not choose independence on September 18th, 2014, it could still (under the planned increased devolution of powers from Westminster) choose to increase investments in the underperforming categories of interventions for health equity listed above.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Scottish Collaboration for Public Health Research and Policy, University of Edinburgh, EH8 9DX, UK. Electronic address: john.frank@ed.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus