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Production and Comprehension of Time Reference in Korean Nonfluent Aphasia.

Lee J, Kwon M, Na HR, Bastiaanse R, Thompson CK - Commun Sci Disord (2013)

Bottom Line: Sentence priming production and auditory sentence to picture matching tasks were used, parallel with the previous cross-linguistic experiments in English, Chinese, Turkish, and others.In production, they were impaired in all time references with errors being dominated by substitution of incorrect time references and other morpho-phonologically well-formed errors, indicating a largely intact morphological affixation process.In comprehension, they showed selective impairment of the past, consistent with the cross-linguistic evidence from English, Chinese, Turkish, and others.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Aphasia & Neurolinguistics Research Laboratory, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA ; Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Individuals with nonfluent agrammatic aphasia show impaired production and comprehension of time reference via verbal morphology. However, cross-linguistic findings to date suggest inconsistent evidence as to whether tense processing in general is impaired or time reference to the past is selectively difficult in this population. This study examined production and comprehension of time reference via verb morphology in Korean-speaking individuals with nonfluent aphasia.

Methods: A group of 9 healthy controls and 8 individuals with nonfluent aphasia (5 for the production task) participated in the study. Sentence priming production and auditory sentence to picture matching tasks were used, parallel with the previous cross-linguistic experiments in English, Chinese, Turkish, and others.

Results: The participants with nonfluent aphasia showed different patterns of impairment in production and comprehension. In production, they were impaired in all time references with errors being dominated by substitution of incorrect time references and other morpho-phonologically well-formed errors, indicating a largely intact morphological affixation process. In comprehension, they showed selective impairment of the past, consistent with the cross-linguistic evidence from English, Chinese, Turkish, and others.

Conclusion: The findings suggest that interpretation of past time reference poses particular difficulty in nonfluent aphasia irrespective of typological characteristics of languages; however, in production, language-specific morpho-semantic functions of verbal morphology may play a significant role in selective breakdowns of time reference.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comprehension accuracies (with standard errors).
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Figure 4: Comprehension accuracies (with standard errors).

Mentions: Figure 4 shows the results from the comprehension task. Between-group comparisons revealed that participants with aphasia showed significantly lower accuracies than control participants in all verb forms (p’s < .002, Mann-Whitney tests). For control participants, parallel to their production results, there was no main effect of verb forms because they showed ceiling performance across conditions (past=99%, present=100%, future=100%; χ2 (2)=1.00, p=.607). For participants with aphasia, different from their production results, there was a main effect of verb form (χ2 (2)=7.548, p=.023). Pair-wise comparisons using Wilcoxon signed ranks tests revealed that participants with aphasia showed significantly lower accuracy in past (39%) compared to present (86%; Z=2.431, p=.025) and future (77%, Z=2.383, p=.017) forms. However, the difference between the present and future was not reliable (Z=1.380, p=.168). Individual data indicated that 7 out of 8 participants with aphasia showed greater difficulty with past than non-past forms (Appendix 2).


Production and Comprehension of Time Reference in Korean Nonfluent Aphasia.

Lee J, Kwon M, Na HR, Bastiaanse R, Thompson CK - Commun Sci Disord (2013)

Comprehension accuracies (with standard errors).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4539264&req=5

Figure 4: Comprehension accuracies (with standard errors).
Mentions: Figure 4 shows the results from the comprehension task. Between-group comparisons revealed that participants with aphasia showed significantly lower accuracies than control participants in all verb forms (p’s < .002, Mann-Whitney tests). For control participants, parallel to their production results, there was no main effect of verb forms because they showed ceiling performance across conditions (past=99%, present=100%, future=100%; χ2 (2)=1.00, p=.607). For participants with aphasia, different from their production results, there was a main effect of verb form (χ2 (2)=7.548, p=.023). Pair-wise comparisons using Wilcoxon signed ranks tests revealed that participants with aphasia showed significantly lower accuracy in past (39%) compared to present (86%; Z=2.431, p=.025) and future (77%, Z=2.383, p=.017) forms. However, the difference between the present and future was not reliable (Z=1.380, p=.168). Individual data indicated that 7 out of 8 participants with aphasia showed greater difficulty with past than non-past forms (Appendix 2).

Bottom Line: Sentence priming production and auditory sentence to picture matching tasks were used, parallel with the previous cross-linguistic experiments in English, Chinese, Turkish, and others.In production, they were impaired in all time references with errors being dominated by substitution of incorrect time references and other morpho-phonologically well-formed errors, indicating a largely intact morphological affixation process.In comprehension, they showed selective impairment of the past, consistent with the cross-linguistic evidence from English, Chinese, Turkish, and others.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Aphasia & Neurolinguistics Research Laboratory, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA ; Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Individuals with nonfluent agrammatic aphasia show impaired production and comprehension of time reference via verbal morphology. However, cross-linguistic findings to date suggest inconsistent evidence as to whether tense processing in general is impaired or time reference to the past is selectively difficult in this population. This study examined production and comprehension of time reference via verb morphology in Korean-speaking individuals with nonfluent aphasia.

Methods: A group of 9 healthy controls and 8 individuals with nonfluent aphasia (5 for the production task) participated in the study. Sentence priming production and auditory sentence to picture matching tasks were used, parallel with the previous cross-linguistic experiments in English, Chinese, Turkish, and others.

Results: The participants with nonfluent aphasia showed different patterns of impairment in production and comprehension. In production, they were impaired in all time references with errors being dominated by substitution of incorrect time references and other morpho-phonologically well-formed errors, indicating a largely intact morphological affixation process. In comprehension, they showed selective impairment of the past, consistent with the cross-linguistic evidence from English, Chinese, Turkish, and others.

Conclusion: The findings suggest that interpretation of past time reference poses particular difficulty in nonfluent aphasia irrespective of typological characteristics of languages; however, in production, language-specific morpho-semantic functions of verbal morphology may play a significant role in selective breakdowns of time reference.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus