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Serum Vitamin A and Inflammatory Markers in Individuals with and without Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

Caram LM, Amaral RA, Ferrari R, Tanni SE, Correa CR, Paiva SA, Godoy I - Mediators Inflamm. (2015)

Bottom Line: Vitamin A is essential for the preservation and integrity of the lung epithelium and exerts anti-inflammatory effects.Smoking (0.197, P = 0.042) exhibited positive association with serum vitamin A.Sputum retinol is quantifiable and is negatively influenced by neutrophils.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Pneumology Area, Botucatu Medical School, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Botucatu Campus, Distrito de Rubião Junior, s/n, 18618-970 Botucatu, SP, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Background: Vitamin A is essential for the preservation and integrity of the lung epithelium and exerts anti-inflammatory effects.

Objective: Evaluating vitamin A in the serum and sputum and testing its correlation with inflammatory markers in individuals with or without COPD. Methods. We evaluated dietary intake, serum and sputum vitamin A, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin- (IL-) 6, IL-8, and C-reactive protein in 50 COPD patients (age = 64.0 ± 8.8 y; FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in the first second) (%) = 49.8 ± 16.8) and 50 controls (age = 48.5 ± 7.4 y; FEV1 (%) = 110.0 ± 15.7).

Results: COPD exhibited lower serum vitamin A (1.8 (1.2-2.1) versus 2.1 (1.8-2.4) μmol/L, P < 0.001) and lower vitamin A intake (636.9 (339.6-1349.6) versus 918.0 (592.1-1654.6) RAE, P = 0.05) when compared with controls. Sputum concentration of vitamin A was not different between groups. Sputum vitamin A and neutrophils were negatively correlated (R (2) = -0.26; P = 0.03). Smoking (0.197, P = 0.042) exhibited positive association with serum vitamin A. COPD was associated with lower serum concentrations of vitamin A without relationship with the systemic inflammation.

Conclusions: Serum concentration of vitamin A is negatively associated with the presence of COPD and positively associated with smoking status. Sputum retinol is quantifiable and is negatively influenced by neutrophils. Although COPD patients exhibited increased inflammation it was not associated with serum retinol.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Correlation between retinol sputum and sputum neutrophil concentrations.
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fig1: Correlation between retinol sputum and sputum neutrophil concentrations.

Mentions: Table 3 presents the intake of protein, energy, and vitamin A and the concentration of vitamin A in the serum. COPD patients exhibited lower levels of protein ingestion in g/day (P = 0.01) and in g/Kg/day (P = 0.01) when compared with the controls. Furthermore, the vitamin A intake (P = 0.05) and the serum concentration of vitamin A (P < 0.001) were lower in the group with airway obstruction. The sputum concentration of vitamin A did not exhibit statistically significant differences (34.5 (8.1–57.6) versus 28.8 (18.0–66.6) μmol/L, P = 0.38) between groups. However, vitamin A and neutrophils were negatively correlated in the sputum (R2 = −0.26; P = 0.03) (Figure 1).


Serum Vitamin A and Inflammatory Markers in Individuals with and without Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

Caram LM, Amaral RA, Ferrari R, Tanni SE, Correa CR, Paiva SA, Godoy I - Mediators Inflamm. (2015)

Correlation between retinol sputum and sputum neutrophil concentrations.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4539170&req=5

fig1: Correlation between retinol sputum and sputum neutrophil concentrations.
Mentions: Table 3 presents the intake of protein, energy, and vitamin A and the concentration of vitamin A in the serum. COPD patients exhibited lower levels of protein ingestion in g/day (P = 0.01) and in g/Kg/day (P = 0.01) when compared with the controls. Furthermore, the vitamin A intake (P = 0.05) and the serum concentration of vitamin A (P < 0.001) were lower in the group with airway obstruction. The sputum concentration of vitamin A did not exhibit statistically significant differences (34.5 (8.1–57.6) versus 28.8 (18.0–66.6) μmol/L, P = 0.38) between groups. However, vitamin A and neutrophils were negatively correlated in the sputum (R2 = −0.26; P = 0.03) (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Vitamin A is essential for the preservation and integrity of the lung epithelium and exerts anti-inflammatory effects.Smoking (0.197, P = 0.042) exhibited positive association with serum vitamin A.Sputum retinol is quantifiable and is negatively influenced by neutrophils.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Pneumology Area, Botucatu Medical School, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Botucatu Campus, Distrito de Rubião Junior, s/n, 18618-970 Botucatu, SP, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Background: Vitamin A is essential for the preservation and integrity of the lung epithelium and exerts anti-inflammatory effects.

Objective: Evaluating vitamin A in the serum and sputum and testing its correlation with inflammatory markers in individuals with or without COPD. Methods. We evaluated dietary intake, serum and sputum vitamin A, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin- (IL-) 6, IL-8, and C-reactive protein in 50 COPD patients (age = 64.0 ± 8.8 y; FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in the first second) (%) = 49.8 ± 16.8) and 50 controls (age = 48.5 ± 7.4 y; FEV1 (%) = 110.0 ± 15.7).

Results: COPD exhibited lower serum vitamin A (1.8 (1.2-2.1) versus 2.1 (1.8-2.4) μmol/L, P < 0.001) and lower vitamin A intake (636.9 (339.6-1349.6) versus 918.0 (592.1-1654.6) RAE, P = 0.05) when compared with controls. Sputum concentration of vitamin A was not different between groups. Sputum vitamin A and neutrophils were negatively correlated (R (2) = -0.26; P = 0.03). Smoking (0.197, P = 0.042) exhibited positive association with serum vitamin A. COPD was associated with lower serum concentrations of vitamin A without relationship with the systemic inflammation.

Conclusions: Serum concentration of vitamin A is negatively associated with the presence of COPD and positively associated with smoking status. Sputum retinol is quantifiable and is negatively influenced by neutrophils. Although COPD patients exhibited increased inflammation it was not associated with serum retinol.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus