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The Influence of Socioeconomic Status on Racial/Ethnic Disparities among the ER/PR/HER2 Breast Cancer Subtypes.

Parise CA, Caggiano V - J Cancer Epidemiol (2015)

Bottom Line: Race/ethnicity did not contribute to the risk of mortality for any subtype in stage 1 when adjusted for SES.Conclusions.Racial/ethnic disparities do not exist in all ER/PR/HER2 subtypes and, in general, SES modestly alters these disparities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sutter Institute for Medical Research, Sacramento, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Background. The eight ER/PR/HER2 breast cancer subtypes vary widely in demographic and clinicopathologic characteristics and survival. This study assesses the contribution of SES to the risk of mortality for blacks, Hispanics, Asian/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians when compared with white women for each ER/PR/HER2 subtype. Methods. We identified 143,184 cases of first primary female invasive breast cancer from the California Cancer Registry between 2000 and 2012. The risk of mortality was computed for each race/ethnicity within each ER/PR/HER2 subtype. Models were adjusted for tumor grade, year of diagnosis, and age. SES was added to a second set of models. Analyses were conducted separately for each stage. Results. Race/ethnicity did not contribute to the risk of mortality for any subtype in stage 1 when adjusted for SES. In stages 2, 3, and 4, race/ethnicity was associated with risk of mortality and adjustment for SES changed the risk only in some subtypes. SES reduced the risk of mortality by over 45% for American Indians with stage 2 ER+/PR+/HER2- cancer, but it decreased the risk of mortality for blacks with stage 2 triple negative cancer by less than 4%. Conclusions. Racial/ethnic disparities do not exist in all ER/PR/HER2 subtypes and, in general, SES modestly alters these disparities.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Unadjusted Kaplan-Meier breast cancer specific survival of the eight ER/PR/HER2 subtypes in 143,184 cases from the California Cancer Registry 2000–2012.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Unadjusted Kaplan-Meier breast cancer specific survival of the eight ER/PR/HER2 subtypes in 143,184 cases from the California Cancer Registry 2000–2012.

Mentions: Table 2 and Figure 1 demonstrate that all of the ER-positive subtypes had better 5-year survival than the ER-negative subtypes, and the ER+/PR+/HER2− subtype had the best overall survival, statistically significantly better than all other subtypes (P < 0.001). The triple negative subtype had the worst overall survival followed by the ER−/PR−/HER2+ subtype.


The Influence of Socioeconomic Status on Racial/Ethnic Disparities among the ER/PR/HER2 Breast Cancer Subtypes.

Parise CA, Caggiano V - J Cancer Epidemiol (2015)

Unadjusted Kaplan-Meier breast cancer specific survival of the eight ER/PR/HER2 subtypes in 143,184 cases from the California Cancer Registry 2000–2012.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4539118&req=5

fig1: Unadjusted Kaplan-Meier breast cancer specific survival of the eight ER/PR/HER2 subtypes in 143,184 cases from the California Cancer Registry 2000–2012.
Mentions: Table 2 and Figure 1 demonstrate that all of the ER-positive subtypes had better 5-year survival than the ER-negative subtypes, and the ER+/PR+/HER2− subtype had the best overall survival, statistically significantly better than all other subtypes (P < 0.001). The triple negative subtype had the worst overall survival followed by the ER−/PR−/HER2+ subtype.

Bottom Line: Race/ethnicity did not contribute to the risk of mortality for any subtype in stage 1 when adjusted for SES.Conclusions.Racial/ethnic disparities do not exist in all ER/PR/HER2 subtypes and, in general, SES modestly alters these disparities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sutter Institute for Medical Research, Sacramento, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Background. The eight ER/PR/HER2 breast cancer subtypes vary widely in demographic and clinicopathologic characteristics and survival. This study assesses the contribution of SES to the risk of mortality for blacks, Hispanics, Asian/Pacific Islanders, and American Indians when compared with white women for each ER/PR/HER2 subtype. Methods. We identified 143,184 cases of first primary female invasive breast cancer from the California Cancer Registry between 2000 and 2012. The risk of mortality was computed for each race/ethnicity within each ER/PR/HER2 subtype. Models were adjusted for tumor grade, year of diagnosis, and age. SES was added to a second set of models. Analyses were conducted separately for each stage. Results. Race/ethnicity did not contribute to the risk of mortality for any subtype in stage 1 when adjusted for SES. In stages 2, 3, and 4, race/ethnicity was associated with risk of mortality and adjustment for SES changed the risk only in some subtypes. SES reduced the risk of mortality by over 45% for American Indians with stage 2 ER+/PR+/HER2- cancer, but it decreased the risk of mortality for blacks with stage 2 triple negative cancer by less than 4%. Conclusions. Racial/ethnic disparities do not exist in all ER/PR/HER2 subtypes and, in general, SES modestly alters these disparities.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus