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Antrochoanal Polyps: How Long Should Follow-Up Be after Surgery?

Chaiyasate S, Roongrotwattanasiri K, Patumanond J, Fooanant S - Int J Otolaryngol (2015)

Bottom Line: Conclusion.Recurrence was significantly higher in children.Follow-up of patients should be for at least 2 years postoperatively in order to detect 95% of recurrence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50000, Thailand.

ABSTRACT
Objective. To investigate the length of follow-up needed to detect recurrence of antrochoanal polyps. Methods. A retrospective investigation was performed on patients who had been operated on with a preoperative diagnosis of antrochoanal polyps in Chiang Mai University hospital from 2006 to 2012. Results and Discussion. Of the 38 cases of choanal polyps, 27 were adults (71%). The median age was 23.5, ranging from 7 to 64 years old. Eighteen patients were male (47.4%). The origin of choanal polyps was the maxillary antrum in 32 patients. The most common symptom was nasal obstruction (97.4%). The surgical procedures were polypectomy in one child and combined endoscopic and transcanine fossa approach in two adults. The remainder of the patients underwent endoscopic removal of the polyps. The follow-up time ranged from 1 day to 8 years. There were 5 cases of recurrence of which four were in children. The time for recurrence was 1.2 ± 0.6 years (95% CI 0.51, 1.97). Conclusion. Antrochoanal polyps are more common in younger patients. Recurrence was significantly higher in children. Follow-up of patients should be for at least 2 years postoperatively in order to detect 95% of recurrence.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Left nasal cavity endoscopic view showing antrochoanal polyp at inferior meatus CT scans. (b) Coronal view, soft tissue window showing cystic component in the maxillary antrum. (c) Coronal view, bone window showing defect of medial maxillary wall below the inferior turbinate. (d) Axial view, soft tissue window; polyp extending into the nasopharynx.
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fig1: (a) Left nasal cavity endoscopic view showing antrochoanal polyp at inferior meatus CT scans. (b) Coronal view, soft tissue window showing cystic component in the maxillary antrum. (c) Coronal view, bone window showing defect of medial maxillary wall below the inferior turbinate. (d) Axial view, soft tissue window; polyp extending into the nasopharynx.

Mentions: The surgical procedures were polypectomy in one child and combined endoscopic and transcanine fossa approach in two adults. The remainder of the patients underwent endoscopic removal of the polyps by a middle meatus antrostomy with an operative note of incomplete removal of the maxillary part in the case of one child. All but one polyp extended into the nasal cavity through the middle meatus, via either natural or accessory ostium. Only one case differed in the children, where the polyp extended through the inferior meatus (Figure 1).


Antrochoanal Polyps: How Long Should Follow-Up Be after Surgery?

Chaiyasate S, Roongrotwattanasiri K, Patumanond J, Fooanant S - Int J Otolaryngol (2015)

(a) Left nasal cavity endoscopic view showing antrochoanal polyp at inferior meatus CT scans. (b) Coronal view, soft tissue window showing cystic component in the maxillary antrum. (c) Coronal view, bone window showing defect of medial maxillary wall below the inferior turbinate. (d) Axial view, soft tissue window; polyp extending into the nasopharynx.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4539068&req=5

fig1: (a) Left nasal cavity endoscopic view showing antrochoanal polyp at inferior meatus CT scans. (b) Coronal view, soft tissue window showing cystic component in the maxillary antrum. (c) Coronal view, bone window showing defect of medial maxillary wall below the inferior turbinate. (d) Axial view, soft tissue window; polyp extending into the nasopharynx.
Mentions: The surgical procedures were polypectomy in one child and combined endoscopic and transcanine fossa approach in two adults. The remainder of the patients underwent endoscopic removal of the polyps by a middle meatus antrostomy with an operative note of incomplete removal of the maxillary part in the case of one child. All but one polyp extended into the nasal cavity through the middle meatus, via either natural or accessory ostium. Only one case differed in the children, where the polyp extended through the inferior meatus (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Conclusion.Recurrence was significantly higher in children.Follow-up of patients should be for at least 2 years postoperatively in order to detect 95% of recurrence.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50000, Thailand.

ABSTRACT
Objective. To investigate the length of follow-up needed to detect recurrence of antrochoanal polyps. Methods. A retrospective investigation was performed on patients who had been operated on with a preoperative diagnosis of antrochoanal polyps in Chiang Mai University hospital from 2006 to 2012. Results and Discussion. Of the 38 cases of choanal polyps, 27 were adults (71%). The median age was 23.5, ranging from 7 to 64 years old. Eighteen patients were male (47.4%). The origin of choanal polyps was the maxillary antrum in 32 patients. The most common symptom was nasal obstruction (97.4%). The surgical procedures were polypectomy in one child and combined endoscopic and transcanine fossa approach in two adults. The remainder of the patients underwent endoscopic removal of the polyps. The follow-up time ranged from 1 day to 8 years. There were 5 cases of recurrence of which four were in children. The time for recurrence was 1.2 ± 0.6 years (95% CI 0.51, 1.97). Conclusion. Antrochoanal polyps are more common in younger patients. Recurrence was significantly higher in children. Follow-up of patients should be for at least 2 years postoperatively in order to detect 95% of recurrence.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus