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Aging, Fitness, and Marathon Times in a 91 Year-old Man Who Competed in 627 Marathons.

Addison O, Steinbrenner G, Goldberg AP, Katzel LI - Br J Med Med Res (2015)

Bottom Line: His times plateaued at ~ 600 minutes in his late eighties.Between ages 68 and 89 his VO2max declined from 43 to 20 ml/kg/min.His marathon times were highly correlated with his VO2max (r(2)=0.87).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, USA. ; The Baltimore Veteran Affairs Medical Center, Geriatrics Research Education and Clinical Center, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA.

ABSTRACT

Aging is associated with a decline in maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max) that may be attenuated by chronic endurance exercise. This case study chronicles the changes in marathon times in a 91 year old man who completed 627 marathons and 117 ultramarathons over 42 years. He began running marathons at age 48. His yearly best times remained fairly constant at ~240 minutes from age 50 - 64 years and then gradually rose to about 260 minutes in his early seventies followed by a curvilinear deterioration as he approached his ninth decade. His times plateaued at ~ 600 minutes in his late eighties. Between ages 68 and 89 his VO2max declined from 43 to 20 ml/kg/min. His marathon times were highly correlated with his VO2max (r(2)=0.87). The decline in marathons times and VO2max may reflect the contributions of biological aging, changes in exercise training volume and intensity, injuries, and comorbid disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Relationship of VO2max to best yearly marathon time for that age. His marathon times over the 23 years were strongly related to VO2max (r2=0.87, p < 0.01)
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Figure 4: Relationship of VO2max to best yearly marathon time for that age. His marathon times over the 23 years were strongly related to VO2max (r2=0.87, p < 0.01)

Mentions: His VO2max at ages 68–72 years was approximately 43 ml/kg/min with an average marathon time ~260 minutes that then declined over the next 23 years (Fig. 3). His marathon times over the next 23 years were highly correlated with VO2max (r2=0.87, p<0.01) (Fig. 4). In his mid-seventies he suffered multiple injuries including: plantar fasciitis, lower back pain, and fracture of multiple ribs as a result of a fall that led to a greater focus on walking. His VO2max continued to decline in his eighties when he developed asymptomatic atrial fibrillation that was medically converted and maintained pharmacologically in normal sinus rhythm. When he was in his late eighties he was diagnosed with asymptomatic chronic lymphocytic leukemia, but did not require pharmacological therapy. Remarkably even with these well controlled but chronic medical problems he was able to complete 14-marathons at age 87. He further completed two marathons at age 88, and 1 at age 89. Shortly after turning 90 he entered his final marathon, but dropped out after 12 miles. After this he stopped competing in marathons, saying that he had lost his motivation. He was satisfied with his lifetime accomplishment completing 627 marathons and 117 ultramarathons. Overall his VO2max declined by 70% over this 23 year longitudinal study.


Aging, Fitness, and Marathon Times in a 91 Year-old Man Who Competed in 627 Marathons.

Addison O, Steinbrenner G, Goldberg AP, Katzel LI - Br J Med Med Res (2015)

Relationship of VO2max to best yearly marathon time for that age. His marathon times over the 23 years were strongly related to VO2max (r2=0.87, p < 0.01)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4538980&req=5

Figure 4: Relationship of VO2max to best yearly marathon time for that age. His marathon times over the 23 years were strongly related to VO2max (r2=0.87, p < 0.01)
Mentions: His VO2max at ages 68–72 years was approximately 43 ml/kg/min with an average marathon time ~260 minutes that then declined over the next 23 years (Fig. 3). His marathon times over the next 23 years were highly correlated with VO2max (r2=0.87, p<0.01) (Fig. 4). In his mid-seventies he suffered multiple injuries including: plantar fasciitis, lower back pain, and fracture of multiple ribs as a result of a fall that led to a greater focus on walking. His VO2max continued to decline in his eighties when he developed asymptomatic atrial fibrillation that was medically converted and maintained pharmacologically in normal sinus rhythm. When he was in his late eighties he was diagnosed with asymptomatic chronic lymphocytic leukemia, but did not require pharmacological therapy. Remarkably even with these well controlled but chronic medical problems he was able to complete 14-marathons at age 87. He further completed two marathons at age 88, and 1 at age 89. Shortly after turning 90 he entered his final marathon, but dropped out after 12 miles. After this he stopped competing in marathons, saying that he had lost his motivation. He was satisfied with his lifetime accomplishment completing 627 marathons and 117 ultramarathons. Overall his VO2max declined by 70% over this 23 year longitudinal study.

Bottom Line: His times plateaued at ~ 600 minutes in his late eighties.Between ages 68 and 89 his VO2max declined from 43 to 20 ml/kg/min.His marathon times were highly correlated with his VO2max (r(2)=0.87).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, USA. ; The Baltimore Veteran Affairs Medical Center, Geriatrics Research Education and Clinical Center, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA.

ABSTRACT

Aging is associated with a decline in maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max) that may be attenuated by chronic endurance exercise. This case study chronicles the changes in marathon times in a 91 year old man who completed 627 marathons and 117 ultramarathons over 42 years. He began running marathons at age 48. His yearly best times remained fairly constant at ~240 minutes from age 50 - 64 years and then gradually rose to about 260 minutes in his early seventies followed by a curvilinear deterioration as he approached his ninth decade. His times plateaued at ~ 600 minutes in his late eighties. Between ages 68 and 89 his VO2max declined from 43 to 20 ml/kg/min. His marathon times were highly correlated with his VO2max (r(2)=0.87). The decline in marathons times and VO2max may reflect the contributions of biological aging, changes in exercise training volume and intensity, injuries, and comorbid disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus