Limits...
Aging, Fitness, and Marathon Times in a 91 Year-old Man Who Competed in 627 Marathons.

Addison O, Steinbrenner G, Goldberg AP, Katzel LI - Br J Med Med Res (2015)

Bottom Line: His times plateaued at ~ 600 minutes in his late eighties.Between ages 68 and 89 his VO2max declined from 43 to 20 ml/kg/min.His marathon times were highly correlated with his VO2max (r(2)=0.87).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, USA. ; The Baltimore Veteran Affairs Medical Center, Geriatrics Research Education and Clinical Center, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA.

ABSTRACT

Aging is associated with a decline in maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max) that may be attenuated by chronic endurance exercise. This case study chronicles the changes in marathon times in a 91 year old man who completed 627 marathons and 117 ultramarathons over 42 years. He began running marathons at age 48. His yearly best times remained fairly constant at ~240 minutes from age 50 - 64 years and then gradually rose to about 260 minutes in his early seventies followed by a curvilinear deterioration as he approached his ninth decade. His times plateaued at ~ 600 minutes in his late eighties. Between ages 68 and 89 his VO2max declined from 43 to 20 ml/kg/min. His marathon times were highly correlated with his VO2max (r(2)=0.87). The decline in marathons times and VO2max may reflect the contributions of biological aging, changes in exercise training volume and intensity, injuries, and comorbid disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Number of marathons and ultramarathons competed in per year. He was able to compete on average in >20 marathons a year between ages 69 and 87 years with a drop off at age 88. Marathons in dark bar, ultramarthons in line bar
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4538980&req=5

Figure 2: Number of marathons and ultramarathons competed in per year. He was able to compete on average in >20 marathons a year between ages 69 and 87 years with a drop off at age 88. Marathons in dark bar, ultramarthons in line bar

Mentions: His lifetime goal was not to run the fastest marathons but rather to complete the greatest number of marathons, averaging ~2/month in 18 countries and 6 continents. The number of marathons that he competed in increased from ~ 6/year in his first 10-years of running to about 20/year in his third-decade of running (Fig. 2). At age 67 he had a radical prostatectomy which accounted for the low number of marathons run that year. The number of marathons he competed in in one year peaked at ~30/year in his early seventies. From 70–80 years he competed in 295 marathons and 58 ultramathons, and in his eighties he competed in 177 marathons and 7 ultramarathons. His last ultramarthon was at age 84. Average weekly training mileages for the first three decades of competition were 28–33 miles/week and his training volume negatively correlated with race times across each decade. (r = −0.64, P<0.001; r = −0.66, P<0.001; r = −0.88, P<0.001).


Aging, Fitness, and Marathon Times in a 91 Year-old Man Who Competed in 627 Marathons.

Addison O, Steinbrenner G, Goldberg AP, Katzel LI - Br J Med Med Res (2015)

Number of marathons and ultramarathons competed in per year. He was able to compete on average in >20 marathons a year between ages 69 and 87 years with a drop off at age 88. Marathons in dark bar, ultramarthons in line bar
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4538980&req=5

Figure 2: Number of marathons and ultramarathons competed in per year. He was able to compete on average in >20 marathons a year between ages 69 and 87 years with a drop off at age 88. Marathons in dark bar, ultramarthons in line bar
Mentions: His lifetime goal was not to run the fastest marathons but rather to complete the greatest number of marathons, averaging ~2/month in 18 countries and 6 continents. The number of marathons that he competed in increased from ~ 6/year in his first 10-years of running to about 20/year in his third-decade of running (Fig. 2). At age 67 he had a radical prostatectomy which accounted for the low number of marathons run that year. The number of marathons he competed in in one year peaked at ~30/year in his early seventies. From 70–80 years he competed in 295 marathons and 58 ultramathons, and in his eighties he competed in 177 marathons and 7 ultramarathons. His last ultramarthon was at age 84. Average weekly training mileages for the first three decades of competition were 28–33 miles/week and his training volume negatively correlated with race times across each decade. (r = −0.64, P<0.001; r = −0.66, P<0.001; r = −0.88, P<0.001).

Bottom Line: His times plateaued at ~ 600 minutes in his late eighties.Between ages 68 and 89 his VO2max declined from 43 to 20 ml/kg/min.His marathon times were highly correlated with his VO2max (r(2)=0.87).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, USA. ; The Baltimore Veteran Affairs Medical Center, Geriatrics Research Education and Clinical Center, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA.

ABSTRACT

Aging is associated with a decline in maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max) that may be attenuated by chronic endurance exercise. This case study chronicles the changes in marathon times in a 91 year old man who completed 627 marathons and 117 ultramarathons over 42 years. He began running marathons at age 48. His yearly best times remained fairly constant at ~240 minutes from age 50 - 64 years and then gradually rose to about 260 minutes in his early seventies followed by a curvilinear deterioration as he approached his ninth decade. His times plateaued at ~ 600 minutes in his late eighties. Between ages 68 and 89 his VO2max declined from 43 to 20 ml/kg/min. His marathon times were highly correlated with his VO2max (r(2)=0.87). The decline in marathons times and VO2max may reflect the contributions of biological aging, changes in exercise training volume and intensity, injuries, and comorbid disease.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus