Limits...
Inner Speech: Development, Cognitive Functions, Phenomenology, and Neurobiology.

Alderson-Day B, Fernyhough C - Psychol Bull (2015)

Bottom Line: Despite a growing body of knowledge on its phenomenology, development, and function, approaches to the scientific study of inner speech have remained diffuse and largely unintegrated.We conclude by considering prospects for an integrated cognitive science of inner speech, and present a multicomponent model of the phenomenon informed by developmental, cognitive, and psycholinguistic considerations.Despite its variability among individuals and across the life span, inner speech appears to perform significant functions in human cognition, which in some cases reflect its developmental origins and its sharing of resources with other cognitive processes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Durham University.

No MeSH data available.


Inner speech (a) as covert articulation, (b) as a flexible abstraction, and (c) in condensed/expanded forms.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4538954&req=5

fig1: Inner speech (a) as covert articulation, (b) as a flexible abstraction, and (c) in condensed/expanded forms.

Mentions: We begin by considering whether the findings reviewed above fit with what might be termed a “minimal” account of inner speech. A number of studies still primarily associate inner speech with a unitary process equivalent to covert articulation (Figure 1a), with specific functions in maintenance of verbal information and covert planning of speech acts (Geva et al., 2011; Marvel & Desmond, 2010; Scott, 2013). This view of inner speech is reflected in the selection of tasks in neuroimaging studies, in which participants are typically asked to repeat words or sentences, or judge the stress of specific syllables. The research reviewed here, however, has implicated inner speech in a variety of cognitive processes including social cognition, executive function, and imagination, with functional properties of inner speech changing considerably with age and linguistic experience. There is also evidence, from psycholinguistic and phenomenological studies, to suggest that inner speech can vary in its phonological, semantic, and syntactic properties, from abstract to concrete, from condensed to expanded, and from inner speaking to inner hearing. A minimal view of a single form of inner speech deployed for such varied functions in such different contexts, and with such differing phenomenology, would at the very least require specification of how a unitary process could operate.


Inner Speech: Development, Cognitive Functions, Phenomenology, and Neurobiology.

Alderson-Day B, Fernyhough C - Psychol Bull (2015)

Inner speech (a) as covert articulation, (b) as a flexible abstraction, and (c) in condensed/expanded forms.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4538954&req=5

fig1: Inner speech (a) as covert articulation, (b) as a flexible abstraction, and (c) in condensed/expanded forms.
Mentions: We begin by considering whether the findings reviewed above fit with what might be termed a “minimal” account of inner speech. A number of studies still primarily associate inner speech with a unitary process equivalent to covert articulation (Figure 1a), with specific functions in maintenance of verbal information and covert planning of speech acts (Geva et al., 2011; Marvel & Desmond, 2010; Scott, 2013). This view of inner speech is reflected in the selection of tasks in neuroimaging studies, in which participants are typically asked to repeat words or sentences, or judge the stress of specific syllables. The research reviewed here, however, has implicated inner speech in a variety of cognitive processes including social cognition, executive function, and imagination, with functional properties of inner speech changing considerably with age and linguistic experience. There is also evidence, from psycholinguistic and phenomenological studies, to suggest that inner speech can vary in its phonological, semantic, and syntactic properties, from abstract to concrete, from condensed to expanded, and from inner speaking to inner hearing. A minimal view of a single form of inner speech deployed for such varied functions in such different contexts, and with such differing phenomenology, would at the very least require specification of how a unitary process could operate.

Bottom Line: Despite a growing body of knowledge on its phenomenology, development, and function, approaches to the scientific study of inner speech have remained diffuse and largely unintegrated.We conclude by considering prospects for an integrated cognitive science of inner speech, and present a multicomponent model of the phenomenon informed by developmental, cognitive, and psycholinguistic considerations.Despite its variability among individuals and across the life span, inner speech appears to perform significant functions in human cognition, which in some cases reflect its developmental origins and its sharing of resources with other cognitive processes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Durham University.

No MeSH data available.