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The evolution of capture myopathy in hooved mammals: a model for human stress cardiomyopathy?

Blumstein DT, Buckner J, Shah S, Patel S, Alfaro ME, Natterson-Horowitz B - Evol Med Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: We found that the following traits were significantly associated with reports of CM: greater brain mass, faster maximum running speed, greater minimum group size and greater maximum longevity.CM may be an unavoidable consequence of adaptations to reduce predation risk that include increased running speed, sociality and having larger brains.Exploring variable susceptibility to CM highlights the evolutionary origins of the disorder, potential basic mechanisms that underlie vulnerability to the phenomenon, and the potential for reduction of risk through modification of life history trajectory.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, 621 Charles E. Young Drive South, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1606, USA; marmots@ucla.edu.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The evolution of CM in ungulates. Maximum likelihood reconstruction of the evolution of CM in the Bininda-Emonds et al. [17] ungulate tree under the well-supported ARD model of evolution (see text for details). Red squares are species in which CM has been reported. The amount of red in the circles illustrates the likelihood that CM was present at an ancestral node
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eov015-F1: The evolution of CM in ungulates. Maximum likelihood reconstruction of the evolution of CM in the Bininda-Emonds et al. [17] ungulate tree under the well-supported ARD model of evolution (see text for details). Red squares are species in which CM has been reported. The amount of red in the circles illustrates the likelihood that CM was present at an ancestral node

Mentions: Our ancestral state inferences are highly sensitive to the method of reporting missing data. This is seen by examining the results of the different reconstructions that varied the relative rates of loss and gain of CM. The ARD model fit the data substantially better than the ER model (AIC = 298.65, ΔAIC = 51.84). Under ARD, where the rate of gaining CM was twice as fast as the rate of losing CM, our data show an equal likelihood for presence or absence of the trait at virtually all internal nodes (Fig. 1). Under this scenario, our ability to infer the ancestral state of medium and deep internal nodes is limited, because the observed distribution of states could be explained by relatively recent or more ancient gains of the state. These findings suggest that the trait is somewhat evolutionarily labile.Figure 1.


The evolution of capture myopathy in hooved mammals: a model for human stress cardiomyopathy?

Blumstein DT, Buckner J, Shah S, Patel S, Alfaro ME, Natterson-Horowitz B - Evol Med Public Health (2015)

The evolution of CM in ungulates. Maximum likelihood reconstruction of the evolution of CM in the Bininda-Emonds et al. [17] ungulate tree under the well-supported ARD model of evolution (see text for details). Red squares are species in which CM has been reported. The amount of red in the circles illustrates the likelihood that CM was present at an ancestral node
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4538952&req=5

eov015-F1: The evolution of CM in ungulates. Maximum likelihood reconstruction of the evolution of CM in the Bininda-Emonds et al. [17] ungulate tree under the well-supported ARD model of evolution (see text for details). Red squares are species in which CM has been reported. The amount of red in the circles illustrates the likelihood that CM was present at an ancestral node
Mentions: Our ancestral state inferences are highly sensitive to the method of reporting missing data. This is seen by examining the results of the different reconstructions that varied the relative rates of loss and gain of CM. The ARD model fit the data substantially better than the ER model (AIC = 298.65, ΔAIC = 51.84). Under ARD, where the rate of gaining CM was twice as fast as the rate of losing CM, our data show an equal likelihood for presence or absence of the trait at virtually all internal nodes (Fig. 1). Under this scenario, our ability to infer the ancestral state of medium and deep internal nodes is limited, because the observed distribution of states could be explained by relatively recent or more ancient gains of the state. These findings suggest that the trait is somewhat evolutionarily labile.Figure 1.

Bottom Line: We found that the following traits were significantly associated with reports of CM: greater brain mass, faster maximum running speed, greater minimum group size and greater maximum longevity.CM may be an unavoidable consequence of adaptations to reduce predation risk that include increased running speed, sociality and having larger brains.Exploring variable susceptibility to CM highlights the evolutionary origins of the disorder, potential basic mechanisms that underlie vulnerability to the phenomenon, and the potential for reduction of risk through modification of life history trajectory.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, 621 Charles E. Young Drive South, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1606, USA; marmots@ucla.edu.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus