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The influence of label co-occurrence and semantic similarity on children's inductive generalization.

Matlen BJ, Fisher AV, Godwin KE - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: However, it remains unclear whether this effect stems from co-occurrence or other factors, and how co-occurrence contributes to generalization.Experiment 2 replicated this effect and provided evidence that co-occurrence training influenced generalization only when the trained labels were categorically-similar.The findings are discussed in relation to the developmental accounts of inductive generalization.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Engineering, and Mathematics Program, Technology, Science, WestEd STEM Program , Redwood City, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Semantically-similar labels that co-occur in child-directed speech (e.g., bunny-rabbit) are more likely to promote inductive generalization in preschoolers than non-co-occurring labels (e.g., lamb-sheep). However, it remains unclear whether this effect stems from co-occurrence or other factors, and how co-occurrence contributes to generalization. To address these issues, preschoolers were exposed to a stream of semantically-similar labels that don't co-occur in natural language, but were arranged to co-occur in the experimental setting. In Experiment 1, children exposed to the co-occurring stream were more likely to make category-consistent inferences than children in two control conditions. Experiment 2 replicated this effect and provided evidence that co-occurrence training influenced generalization only when the trained labels were categorically-similar. These findings suggest that both co-occurrence information and semantic representations contribute to preschool-age children's inductive generalization. The findings are discussed in relation to the developmental accounts of inductive generalization.

No MeSH data available.


Mean proportion of trained responses by condition in Experiment 2. Error bars represent standard errors of the means. The dotted line indicates chance performance.
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Figure 3: Mean proportion of trained responses by condition in Experiment 2. Error bars represent standard errors of the means. The dotted line indicates chance performance.

Mentions: The proportion of Trained item choices in the Non-Synonym Co-Occurrence Training condition of Experiment 2 did not exceed chance [M = 0.49, SD = 0.17; t(15) = < 1, ns], suggesting that co-occurrence alone is not sufficient to induce category-consistent generalization. As in Experiment 1, children’s performance in the Synonym Co-occurrence Training condition was significantly greater than chance (M = 0.69, SD = 0.22), one-sample t(17) = 3.69, p < 0.005 (see Figure 3). The proportion of Category-choice responses in the No Training Baseline condition (M = 0.57, SD = 0.15) was not significantly above chance, one-sample t(17) = 1.97, p = 0.07.


The influence of label co-occurrence and semantic similarity on children's inductive generalization.

Matlen BJ, Fisher AV, Godwin KE - Front Psychol (2015)

Mean proportion of trained responses by condition in Experiment 2. Error bars represent standard errors of the means. The dotted line indicates chance performance.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4538920&req=5

Figure 3: Mean proportion of trained responses by condition in Experiment 2. Error bars represent standard errors of the means. The dotted line indicates chance performance.
Mentions: The proportion of Trained item choices in the Non-Synonym Co-Occurrence Training condition of Experiment 2 did not exceed chance [M = 0.49, SD = 0.17; t(15) = < 1, ns], suggesting that co-occurrence alone is not sufficient to induce category-consistent generalization. As in Experiment 1, children’s performance in the Synonym Co-occurrence Training condition was significantly greater than chance (M = 0.69, SD = 0.22), one-sample t(17) = 3.69, p < 0.005 (see Figure 3). The proportion of Category-choice responses in the No Training Baseline condition (M = 0.57, SD = 0.15) was not significantly above chance, one-sample t(17) = 1.97, p = 0.07.

Bottom Line: However, it remains unclear whether this effect stems from co-occurrence or other factors, and how co-occurrence contributes to generalization.Experiment 2 replicated this effect and provided evidence that co-occurrence training influenced generalization only when the trained labels were categorically-similar.The findings are discussed in relation to the developmental accounts of inductive generalization.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Engineering, and Mathematics Program, Technology, Science, WestEd STEM Program , Redwood City, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Semantically-similar labels that co-occur in child-directed speech (e.g., bunny-rabbit) are more likely to promote inductive generalization in preschoolers than non-co-occurring labels (e.g., lamb-sheep). However, it remains unclear whether this effect stems from co-occurrence or other factors, and how co-occurrence contributes to generalization. To address these issues, preschoolers were exposed to a stream of semantically-similar labels that don't co-occur in natural language, but were arranged to co-occur in the experimental setting. In Experiment 1, children exposed to the co-occurring stream were more likely to make category-consistent inferences than children in two control conditions. Experiment 2 replicated this effect and provided evidence that co-occurrence training influenced generalization only when the trained labels were categorically-similar. These findings suggest that both co-occurrence information and semantic representations contribute to preschool-age children's inductive generalization. The findings are discussed in relation to the developmental accounts of inductive generalization.

No MeSH data available.