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A Falsification of the Citation Impediment in the Taxonomic Literature.

Steiner FM, Pautasso M, Zettel H, Moder K, Arthofer W, Schlick-Steiner BC - Syst. Biol. (2015)

Bottom Line: Our results show that, contrary to common belief, taxonomic contributions do not generally reduce a journal's citation performance and might even increase it.Thus, editors of highly visible journals inviting taxonomic contributions could benefit from taxonomy's strong momentum.We conclude that taxonomy's standing in the present citation-focused scientific landscape could easily improve-if the community becomes aware that there is no citation impediment in taxonomy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Molecular Ecology Group, Institute of Ecology, University of Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria florian.m.steiner@uibk.ac.at.

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The number of taxonomic publications (1993–2012) included in (a, b) WoS, and (c) ZR, on (a) all organisms, (b) plants, microorganisms, and animals, and (c) just animals; in addition, in (b, c) the numbers are shown for animals when excluding the journal Zootaxa. The results of regression analyses comparing the  of linear (lin) and exponential (exp) functions are added. d) The portion of taxonomic publications on all organisms and on plants, microorganisms, and animals included in WoS of all biological publications in WoS. See Online Appendix 4a–h for the database query protocols used and Appendix 5 for the regression analysis results available as Supplementary Material on Dryad at http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.3t761. Years are given as relative years as used in the regression analyses: , .
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Figure 2: The number of taxonomic publications (1993–2012) included in (a, b) WoS, and (c) ZR, on (a) all organisms, (b) plants, microorganisms, and animals, and (c) just animals; in addition, in (b, c) the numbers are shown for animals when excluding the journal Zootaxa. The results of regression analyses comparing the of linear (lin) and exponential (exp) functions are added. d) The portion of taxonomic publications on all organisms and on plants, microorganisms, and animals included in WoS of all biological publications in WoS. See Online Appendix 4a–h for the database query protocols used and Appendix 5 for the regression analysis results available as Supplementary Material on Dryad at http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.3t761. Years are given as relative years as used in the regression analyses: , .

Mentions: It is not enough, however, for editors of highly visible journals to actively invite taxonomic contributions. A crucial question about whether increasing taxonomy's visibility will work is the capacity of taxonomy to follow the invitation. One way to approach this issue is looking at the growth rate of taxonomy. To have enough data points for a regression analysis, we analyzed the period 1993–2012. Over this period, the number of taxonomic publications in journals included in WoS grew steadily, and the growth is better explained by an exponential than by a linear model, for all organisms (Fig. 2a; see Online Appendices 4 and 5 for the protocols of database queries and statistical analysis, available as Supplementary Material on Dryad at http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.3t761, respectively) as well as for plants, microorganisms, and animals (Fig. 2b). Possibly even more importantly, taxonomy as represented in WoS grew over the same period with greater speed than biology, again for all organisms as well as for plants, microorganisms, and animals (Fig. 2d) despite the decelerated growth rate of all biodiversity research in the past few years (Stork and Astrin 2014). This greater speed in growth makes it plausible that editors publishing taxonomy might indeed boost their journals.


A Falsification of the Citation Impediment in the Taxonomic Literature.

Steiner FM, Pautasso M, Zettel H, Moder K, Arthofer W, Schlick-Steiner BC - Syst. Biol. (2015)

The number of taxonomic publications (1993–2012) included in (a, b) WoS, and (c) ZR, on (a) all organisms, (b) plants, microorganisms, and animals, and (c) just animals; in addition, in (b, c) the numbers are shown for animals when excluding the journal Zootaxa. The results of regression analyses comparing the  of linear (lin) and exponential (exp) functions are added. d) The portion of taxonomic publications on all organisms and on plants, microorganisms, and animals included in WoS of all biological publications in WoS. See Online Appendix 4a–h for the database query protocols used and Appendix 5 for the regression analysis results available as Supplementary Material on Dryad at http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.3t761. Years are given as relative years as used in the regression analyses: , .
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4538880&req=5

Figure 2: The number of taxonomic publications (1993–2012) included in (a, b) WoS, and (c) ZR, on (a) all organisms, (b) plants, microorganisms, and animals, and (c) just animals; in addition, in (b, c) the numbers are shown for animals when excluding the journal Zootaxa. The results of regression analyses comparing the of linear (lin) and exponential (exp) functions are added. d) The portion of taxonomic publications on all organisms and on plants, microorganisms, and animals included in WoS of all biological publications in WoS. See Online Appendix 4a–h for the database query protocols used and Appendix 5 for the regression analysis results available as Supplementary Material on Dryad at http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.3t761. Years are given as relative years as used in the regression analyses: , .
Mentions: It is not enough, however, for editors of highly visible journals to actively invite taxonomic contributions. A crucial question about whether increasing taxonomy's visibility will work is the capacity of taxonomy to follow the invitation. One way to approach this issue is looking at the growth rate of taxonomy. To have enough data points for a regression analysis, we analyzed the period 1993–2012. Over this period, the number of taxonomic publications in journals included in WoS grew steadily, and the growth is better explained by an exponential than by a linear model, for all organisms (Fig. 2a; see Online Appendices 4 and 5 for the protocols of database queries and statistical analysis, available as Supplementary Material on Dryad at http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.3t761, respectively) as well as for plants, microorganisms, and animals (Fig. 2b). Possibly even more importantly, taxonomy as represented in WoS grew over the same period with greater speed than biology, again for all organisms as well as for plants, microorganisms, and animals (Fig. 2d) despite the decelerated growth rate of all biodiversity research in the past few years (Stork and Astrin 2014). This greater speed in growth makes it plausible that editors publishing taxonomy might indeed boost their journals.

Bottom Line: Our results show that, contrary to common belief, taxonomic contributions do not generally reduce a journal's citation performance and might even increase it.Thus, editors of highly visible journals inviting taxonomic contributions could benefit from taxonomy's strong momentum.We conclude that taxonomy's standing in the present citation-focused scientific landscape could easily improve-if the community becomes aware that there is no citation impediment in taxonomy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Molecular Ecology Group, Institute of Ecology, University of Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria florian.m.steiner@uibk.ac.at.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus