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Heterogeneity of Genetic Damage in Cervical Nuclei and Lymphocytes in Women with Different Levels of Dysplasia and Cancer-Associated Risk Factors.

Alvarez-Moya C, Reynoso-Silva M, Canales-Aguirre AA, Chavez-Chavez JO, Castañeda-Vázquez H, Feria-Velasco AI - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: The comet assay can be used to assess genetic damage, but heterogeneity in the length of the tails is frequently observed.A comet assay was performed in peripheral blood lymphocytes and cervical epithelial cells.Results suggest that genetic damage could be widely present but only manifested as increased tail length in certain cell populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cellular and Molecular Biology Department, Guadalajara University, Juarez 976, Colonia Centro, 44100 Guadalajara, JAL, Mexico.

ABSTRACT
The comet assay can be used to assess genetic damage, but heterogeneity in the length of the tails is frequently observed. The aims of this study were to evaluate genetic damage and heterogeneity in the cervical nuclei and lymphocytes from patients with different levels of dysplasia and to determine the risk factors associated with the development of cervical cancer. The study included 97 females who presented with different levels of dysplasia. A comet assay was performed in peripheral blood lymphocytes and cervical epithelial cells. Significant genetic damage (P ≤ 0.05) was observed only in patients diagnosed with nuclei cervical from dysplasia III (NCDIII) and lymphocytes from dysplasia I (LDI). However, the standard deviations of the tail lengths in the cervical nuclei and lymphocytes from patients with dysplasia I were significantly different (P ≤ 0.0001) from the standard deviations of the tail lengths in the nuclei cervical and lymphocytes from patients with DII and DIII (NCDII, NCDIII and LDII, LDIII), indicating a high heterogeneity in tail length. Results suggest that genetic damage could be widely present but only manifested as increased tail length in certain cell populations. This heterogeneity could obscure the statistical significance of the genetic damage.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of the average tail length of cervical nuclei and lymphocytes from women with different degrees of dysplasia. On the x-axis the number women screened is displayed. The color refers to the cell type studied and the level of dysplasia. The y-axis indicates the average tail length of lymphocytes or cervical nucleus in each of women.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Distribution of the average tail length of cervical nuclei and lymphocytes from women with different degrees of dysplasia. On the x-axis the number women screened is displayed. The color refers to the cell type studied and the level of dysplasia. The y-axis indicates the average tail length of lymphocytes or cervical nucleus in each of women.

Mentions: The distribution and average tail lengths of lymphocytes and cervical nuclei from women with different levels of dysplasia are presented in Figure 1. All of the study groups showed heterogeneity in the average migration tail length, although cervical nuclei and lymphocytes from the DI group showed a higher degree of heterogeneity. The correlation coefficients between the average migration of the cervical nuclei and lymphocytes from women with varying degrees of dysplasia are shown in Table 1. NCDI and LDI showed the highest degree of correlation (0.9606). NCDII-LDII, NCDIII-LDIII, and NCNC-LNC had correlations of 0.8735, 0.9360, and 0.8856, respectively.


Heterogeneity of Genetic Damage in Cervical Nuclei and Lymphocytes in Women with Different Levels of Dysplasia and Cancer-Associated Risk Factors.

Alvarez-Moya C, Reynoso-Silva M, Canales-Aguirre AA, Chavez-Chavez JO, Castañeda-Vázquez H, Feria-Velasco AI - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Distribution of the average tail length of cervical nuclei and lymphocytes from women with different degrees of dysplasia. On the x-axis the number women screened is displayed. The color refers to the cell type studied and the level of dysplasia. The y-axis indicates the average tail length of lymphocytes or cervical nucleus in each of women.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4538336&req=5

fig1: Distribution of the average tail length of cervical nuclei and lymphocytes from women with different degrees of dysplasia. On the x-axis the number women screened is displayed. The color refers to the cell type studied and the level of dysplasia. The y-axis indicates the average tail length of lymphocytes or cervical nucleus in each of women.
Mentions: The distribution and average tail lengths of lymphocytes and cervical nuclei from women with different levels of dysplasia are presented in Figure 1. All of the study groups showed heterogeneity in the average migration tail length, although cervical nuclei and lymphocytes from the DI group showed a higher degree of heterogeneity. The correlation coefficients between the average migration of the cervical nuclei and lymphocytes from women with varying degrees of dysplasia are shown in Table 1. NCDI and LDI showed the highest degree of correlation (0.9606). NCDII-LDII, NCDIII-LDIII, and NCNC-LNC had correlations of 0.8735, 0.9360, and 0.8856, respectively.

Bottom Line: The comet assay can be used to assess genetic damage, but heterogeneity in the length of the tails is frequently observed.A comet assay was performed in peripheral blood lymphocytes and cervical epithelial cells.Results suggest that genetic damage could be widely present but only manifested as increased tail length in certain cell populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cellular and Molecular Biology Department, Guadalajara University, Juarez 976, Colonia Centro, 44100 Guadalajara, JAL, Mexico.

ABSTRACT
The comet assay can be used to assess genetic damage, but heterogeneity in the length of the tails is frequently observed. The aims of this study were to evaluate genetic damage and heterogeneity in the cervical nuclei and lymphocytes from patients with different levels of dysplasia and to determine the risk factors associated with the development of cervical cancer. The study included 97 females who presented with different levels of dysplasia. A comet assay was performed in peripheral blood lymphocytes and cervical epithelial cells. Significant genetic damage (P ≤ 0.05) was observed only in patients diagnosed with nuclei cervical from dysplasia III (NCDIII) and lymphocytes from dysplasia I (LDI). However, the standard deviations of the tail lengths in the cervical nuclei and lymphocytes from patients with dysplasia I were significantly different (P ≤ 0.0001) from the standard deviations of the tail lengths in the nuclei cervical and lymphocytes from patients with DII and DIII (NCDII, NCDIII and LDII, LDIII), indicating a high heterogeneity in tail length. Results suggest that genetic damage could be widely present but only manifested as increased tail length in certain cell populations. This heterogeneity could obscure the statistical significance of the genetic damage.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus