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Reproductive Factors but Not Hormonal Factors Associated with Thyroid Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Cao Y, Wang Z, Gu J, Hu F, Qi Y, Yin Q, Sun Q, Li G, Quan B - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: This review was aimed at precisely estimating this association by pooling all available epidemiological studies. 25 independent studies were retrieved after a comprehensive literature search in databases of PubMed and Embase.Older age at menopause was associated with weakly increased risk of thyroid cancer in overall analysis (RR = 1.24, 95% CI 1.00-1.53, P = 0.049); however, longer duration of breast feeding was related to moderately reduced risk of thyroid cancer, suggested by pooled analysis in all cohort studies (RR = 0.7, 95% CI 0.51-0.95, P = 0.021).The pooled RR in hospital-based case-control studies implicated that parous women were more susceptible to thyroid cancer than iparous women (RR = 2.30, 95% CI 1.31-4.04, P = 0.004).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Reproductive Center, Central Hospital of Xuzhou, Affiliated Xuzhou Hospital of Southeast University, Xuzhou 221009, China.

ABSTRACT
Many studies have investigated the association between hormonal and reproductive factors and thyroid cancer risk but provided contradictory and inconclusive findings. This review was aimed at precisely estimating this association by pooling all available epidemiological studies. 25 independent studies were retrieved after a comprehensive literature search in databases of PubMed and Embase. Overall, common hormonal factors including oral contraceptive and hormone replacement therapy did not alter the risk of thyroid cancer. Older age at menopause was associated with weakly increased risk of thyroid cancer in overall analysis (RR = 1.24, 95% CI 1.00-1.53, P = 0.049); however, longer duration of breast feeding was related to moderately reduced risk of thyroid cancer, suggested by pooled analysis in all cohort studies (RR = 0.7, 95% CI 0.51-0.95, P = 0.021). The pooled RR in hospital-based case-control studies implicated that parous women were more susceptible to thyroid cancer than iparous women (RR = 2.30, 95% CI 1.31-4.04, P = 0.004). The present meta-analysis suggests that older age at menopause and parity are risk factors for thyroid cancer, while longer duration of breast feeding plays a protective role against this cancer. Nevertheless, more relevant epidemiological studies are warranted to investigate roles of hormonal and reproductive factors in thyroid carcinogenesis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Forest plot for thyroid cancer risk related to duration of breastfeeding.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig2: Forest plot for thyroid cancer risk related to duration of breastfeeding.

Mentions: The pooled RRs revealed that older age at menopause was associated with weakly increased risk of thyroid cancer in overall analysis (RR = 1.24, 95% CI 1.00–1.53, P = 0.049) (Table 2; Figure 1), whereas longer duration of breast feeding was related to moderately reduced risk of thyroid cancer in cohort studies (RR = 0.7, 95% CI 0.51–0.95, P = 0.021) (Table 2; Figure 2). Stratified analysis in hospital-based case-control studies showed that more parity could increase the risk of thyroid cancer (RR = 2.30, 95% CI 1.31–4.04, P = 0.004) (Table 2; Figure 3). No significant relationship was observed between thyroid cancer risk and other common reproductive factors (Table 2). Sensitivity analysis did not materially alter the pooled results (data not shown).


Reproductive Factors but Not Hormonal Factors Associated with Thyroid Cancer Risk: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Cao Y, Wang Z, Gu J, Hu F, Qi Y, Yin Q, Sun Q, Li G, Quan B - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Forest plot for thyroid cancer risk related to duration of breastfeeding.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4538312&req=5

fig2: Forest plot for thyroid cancer risk related to duration of breastfeeding.
Mentions: The pooled RRs revealed that older age at menopause was associated with weakly increased risk of thyroid cancer in overall analysis (RR = 1.24, 95% CI 1.00–1.53, P = 0.049) (Table 2; Figure 1), whereas longer duration of breast feeding was related to moderately reduced risk of thyroid cancer in cohort studies (RR = 0.7, 95% CI 0.51–0.95, P = 0.021) (Table 2; Figure 2). Stratified analysis in hospital-based case-control studies showed that more parity could increase the risk of thyroid cancer (RR = 2.30, 95% CI 1.31–4.04, P = 0.004) (Table 2; Figure 3). No significant relationship was observed between thyroid cancer risk and other common reproductive factors (Table 2). Sensitivity analysis did not materially alter the pooled results (data not shown).

Bottom Line: This review was aimed at precisely estimating this association by pooling all available epidemiological studies. 25 independent studies were retrieved after a comprehensive literature search in databases of PubMed and Embase.Older age at menopause was associated with weakly increased risk of thyroid cancer in overall analysis (RR = 1.24, 95% CI 1.00-1.53, P = 0.049); however, longer duration of breast feeding was related to moderately reduced risk of thyroid cancer, suggested by pooled analysis in all cohort studies (RR = 0.7, 95% CI 0.51-0.95, P = 0.021).The pooled RR in hospital-based case-control studies implicated that parous women were more susceptible to thyroid cancer than iparous women (RR = 2.30, 95% CI 1.31-4.04, P = 0.004).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Reproductive Center, Central Hospital of Xuzhou, Affiliated Xuzhou Hospital of Southeast University, Xuzhou 221009, China.

ABSTRACT
Many studies have investigated the association between hormonal and reproductive factors and thyroid cancer risk but provided contradictory and inconclusive findings. This review was aimed at precisely estimating this association by pooling all available epidemiological studies. 25 independent studies were retrieved after a comprehensive literature search in databases of PubMed and Embase. Overall, common hormonal factors including oral contraceptive and hormone replacement therapy did not alter the risk of thyroid cancer. Older age at menopause was associated with weakly increased risk of thyroid cancer in overall analysis (RR = 1.24, 95% CI 1.00-1.53, P = 0.049); however, longer duration of breast feeding was related to moderately reduced risk of thyroid cancer, suggested by pooled analysis in all cohort studies (RR = 0.7, 95% CI 0.51-0.95, P = 0.021). The pooled RR in hospital-based case-control studies implicated that parous women were more susceptible to thyroid cancer than iparous women (RR = 2.30, 95% CI 1.31-4.04, P = 0.004). The present meta-analysis suggests that older age at menopause and parity are risk factors for thyroid cancer, while longer duration of breast feeding plays a protective role against this cancer. Nevertheless, more relevant epidemiological studies are warranted to investigate roles of hormonal and reproductive factors in thyroid carcinogenesis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus