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Traffic pollution at the home address and pregnancy outcomes in Stockholm, Sweden.

Olsson D, Mogren I, Eneroth K, Forsberg B - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: For the past two decades, several studies have reported associations between elevated levels of ambient air pollution and adverse pregnancy outcomes, although with varying conclusions.To examine possible associations between the traffic pollution situation at the home address, for women who did not change address during pregnancy, and three types of pregnancy outcomes: spontaneous preterm delivery, children born small for gestational age (SGA) and pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders.The 2nd to 4th quartiles of NOx were all associated with an increased risk of SGA, but there was no difference in the risk estimate among the higher quartiles.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Map of the distribution of annual average nitrogen oxide (NOx) levels in Stockholm.
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BMJOPEN2014007034F1: Map of the distribution of annual average nitrogen oxide (NOx) levels in Stockholm.

Mentions: The average NOx level at the home addresses for the study subjects during the first trimester was 15.1 µg/m3 (SD=7.4), and the average maximal traffic flow within the 100×100 m grid was 2569 vehicles/day (SD=7712). The spatial distribution of annual NOx averages is shown in figure 1. The IQR for the average NOx level at the home address during the full period of gestation was 9.2, and for traffic flow the IQR was 3672. The correlation between the first trimester average NOx levels at the home address and traffic flow was 0.42 during the study period.


Traffic pollution at the home address and pregnancy outcomes in Stockholm, Sweden.

Olsson D, Mogren I, Eneroth K, Forsberg B - BMJ Open (2015)

Map of the distribution of annual average nitrogen oxide (NOx) levels in Stockholm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4538290&req=5

BMJOPEN2014007034F1: Map of the distribution of annual average nitrogen oxide (NOx) levels in Stockholm.
Mentions: The average NOx level at the home addresses for the study subjects during the first trimester was 15.1 µg/m3 (SD=7.4), and the average maximal traffic flow within the 100×100 m grid was 2569 vehicles/day (SD=7712). The spatial distribution of annual NOx averages is shown in figure 1. The IQR for the average NOx level at the home address during the full period of gestation was 9.2, and for traffic flow the IQR was 3672. The correlation between the first trimester average NOx levels at the home address and traffic flow was 0.42 during the study period.

Bottom Line: For the past two decades, several studies have reported associations between elevated levels of ambient air pollution and adverse pregnancy outcomes, although with varying conclusions.To examine possible associations between the traffic pollution situation at the home address, for women who did not change address during pregnancy, and three types of pregnancy outcomes: spontaneous preterm delivery, children born small for gestational age (SGA) and pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders.The 2nd to 4th quartiles of NOx were all associated with an increased risk of SGA, but there was no difference in the risk estimate among the higher quartiles.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus