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Patients recording clinical encounters: a path to empowerment? Assessment by mixed methods.

Elwyn G, Barr PJ, Grande SW - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: To examine the motivations of patients recording clinical encounters, covertly or otherwise, and why some do not wish to record encounters.Patients know that recording challenges the 'ceremonial order of the clinic', and so some decide to act covertly.Patients wanted clearer, more permissive policies to be developed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Preference Laboratory, The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Thematic data representation.
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BMJOPEN2015008566F1: Thematic data representation.

Mentions: Of the 130 respondents who completed the survey, 56 agreed to be contacted. Of those 56, 21 consented and 18 were interviewed. We excluded data from one respondent who was not from the UK. We included data from 17 interviews, 10 women and 7 men, all of whom had college (or higher) levels of education; 70% were 41 years or older and all spoke English at home, save for one individual (for details, see online supplementary appendix S2). Three of the interviewees had covertly recorded in the past, five interviewees would consider secretly recording, seven interviewees would only record with permission and two interviewees would not record. Figure 1 provides a thematic representation of the interview data.


Patients recording clinical encounters: a path to empowerment? Assessment by mixed methods.

Elwyn G, Barr PJ, Grande SW - BMJ Open (2015)

Thematic data representation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4538278&req=5

BMJOPEN2015008566F1: Thematic data representation.
Mentions: Of the 130 respondents who completed the survey, 56 agreed to be contacted. Of those 56, 21 consented and 18 were interviewed. We excluded data from one respondent who was not from the UK. We included data from 17 interviews, 10 women and 7 men, all of whom had college (or higher) levels of education; 70% were 41 years or older and all spoke English at home, save for one individual (for details, see online supplementary appendix S2). Three of the interviewees had covertly recorded in the past, five interviewees would consider secretly recording, seven interviewees would only record with permission and two interviewees would not record. Figure 1 provides a thematic representation of the interview data.

Bottom Line: To examine the motivations of patients recording clinical encounters, covertly or otherwise, and why some do not wish to record encounters.Patients know that recording challenges the 'ceremonial order of the clinic', and so some decide to act covertly.Patients wanted clearer, more permissive policies to be developed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Preference Laboratory, The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire, USA.

No MeSH data available.