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A police education programme to integrate occupational safety and HIV prevention: protocol for a modified stepped-wedge study design with parallel prospective cohorts to assess behavioural outcomes.

Strathdee SA, Arredondo J, Rocha T, Abramovitz D, Rolon ML, Patiño Mandujano E, Rangel MG, Olivarria HO, Gaines T, Patterson TL, Beletsky L - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: PEPs incorporating HIV prevention (including harm reduction programmes like syringe exchange) have been successfully piloted in several countries but were limited to brief pre-post assessments; the impact of PEPs on policing behaviours and occupational safety is unknown.Findings will be disseminated through open access to protocol materials through the Law Enforcement and HIV Network.NCT02444403.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA.

No MeSH data available.


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Conceptual model to evaluate the impact of a police education programme.
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BMJOPEN2015008958F1: Conceptual model to evaluate the impact of a police education programme.

Mentions: The transcontextual Model (TCM) has been successfully used to evaluate injury prevention PEPs in international settings.56 We applied the TCM to conceptualise and assess mechanisms through which the PEP can impact occupational safety and officers’ behaviours. This model incorporates key theoretical constructs from self-determination theory (SDT)57 and the theory of planned behaviour (TPB).58 TPB emphasises the role of psychosocial factors in affecting decision-making processes that translate to changes in behaviour. Herein, such factors include trainee attitudes, subjective norms, self-efficacy and intentions (see figure 1). These TPB constructs have had robust predictive value in the realm of injury prevention.5960 SDT highlights the role of motivation and perceived autonomy as ‘regulators’ that may mediate the impact of training initiatives on trainee practices and adherence. Perceived support by supervisors (autonomy support) for injury prevention61 and motivation to participate in an educational intervention are known antecedents for change in behavioural and corollary end points.62 Validated in the realm of occupational safety and injury prevention,6364 TCM is based on the complex interplay between SDT and TPB factors in shaping the impact of educational interventions.56 The TCM model also suggests that changes in self-efficacy produced by training can be transferred to domains that are related but do not serve as the focus of the training intervention.56 Herein, TCM elucidates the pathways through which the PEP may shift ancillary police activities, including adherence to departmental procedures and drug policies (eg, targeting PWID for enforcement activities as they seek to access SEPs or OST). These shifts may improve police occupational safety by reducing the prevalence of adverse encounters with PWID, but they may also have collateral population health benefits such as reducing risk behaviour and infectious disease incidence among PWID. TCM has been widely used in the context of physical education training,65–68 and research on police occupational health, but its use in the assessment of a PEP focused on NSI prevention is innovative.56


A police education programme to integrate occupational safety and HIV prevention: protocol for a modified stepped-wedge study design with parallel prospective cohorts to assess behavioural outcomes.

Strathdee SA, Arredondo J, Rocha T, Abramovitz D, Rolon ML, Patiño Mandujano E, Rangel MG, Olivarria HO, Gaines T, Patterson TL, Beletsky L - BMJ Open (2015)

Conceptual model to evaluate the impact of a police education programme.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4538275&req=5

BMJOPEN2015008958F1: Conceptual model to evaluate the impact of a police education programme.
Mentions: The transcontextual Model (TCM) has been successfully used to evaluate injury prevention PEPs in international settings.56 We applied the TCM to conceptualise and assess mechanisms through which the PEP can impact occupational safety and officers’ behaviours. This model incorporates key theoretical constructs from self-determination theory (SDT)57 and the theory of planned behaviour (TPB).58 TPB emphasises the role of psychosocial factors in affecting decision-making processes that translate to changes in behaviour. Herein, such factors include trainee attitudes, subjective norms, self-efficacy and intentions (see figure 1). These TPB constructs have had robust predictive value in the realm of injury prevention.5960 SDT highlights the role of motivation and perceived autonomy as ‘regulators’ that may mediate the impact of training initiatives on trainee practices and adherence. Perceived support by supervisors (autonomy support) for injury prevention61 and motivation to participate in an educational intervention are known antecedents for change in behavioural and corollary end points.62 Validated in the realm of occupational safety and injury prevention,6364 TCM is based on the complex interplay between SDT and TPB factors in shaping the impact of educational interventions.56 The TCM model also suggests that changes in self-efficacy produced by training can be transferred to domains that are related but do not serve as the focus of the training intervention.56 Herein, TCM elucidates the pathways through which the PEP may shift ancillary police activities, including adherence to departmental procedures and drug policies (eg, targeting PWID for enforcement activities as they seek to access SEPs or OST). These shifts may improve police occupational safety by reducing the prevalence of adverse encounters with PWID, but they may also have collateral population health benefits such as reducing risk behaviour and infectious disease incidence among PWID. TCM has been widely used in the context of physical education training,65–68 and research on police occupational health, but its use in the assessment of a PEP focused on NSI prevention is innovative.56

Bottom Line: PEPs incorporating HIV prevention (including harm reduction programmes like syringe exchange) have been successfully piloted in several countries but were limited to brief pre-post assessments; the impact of PEPs on policing behaviours and occupational safety is unknown.Findings will be disseminated through open access to protocol materials through the Law Enforcement and HIV Network.NCT02444403.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus