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Temporal trends in cardiovascular disease risk factors among white, South Asian, Chinese and black groups in Ontario, Canada, 2001 to 2012: a population-based study.

Chiu M, Maclagan LC, Tu JV, Shah BR - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: The prevalence of hypertension increased the most among black females.Smoking prevalence decreased by more than 20% among South Asian, Chinese and white females.Awareness of the direction and magnitude of these risk factor trends may be useful in informing targeted strategies for preventing cardiovascular diseases in multiethnic populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Summary of trends in major cardiovascular risk factors among males and females by ethnicity, Ontario, Canada. Data were derived from the Ontario components of Statistics Canada's Canadian Community Health Surveys. Arrows ↑↓ indicate ≥20% increases or decreases in major cardiovascular risk factor prevalences comparing the estimates for 2009-2012 to estimates for 2001-2004. *P<0.05.
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BMJOPEN2014007232F4: Summary of trends in major cardiovascular risk factors among males and females by ethnicity, Ontario, Canada. Data were derived from the Ontario components of Statistics Canada's Canadian Community Health Surveys. Arrows ↑↓ indicate ≥20% increases or decreases in major cardiovascular risk factor prevalences comparing the estimates for 2009-2012 to estimates for 2001-2004. *P<0.05.

Mentions: Figure 4 summarises the trends in the major cardiovascular disease risk factors among males and females of the different ethnic groups. Trends for which the per cent change was more than 20% are shown—overall, the prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk factors appeared to be worsening the most in South Asian males (ie, large increases in diabetes, hypertension and overweight/obesity prevalence), black males (ie, large increases in diabetes and obesity prevalence) and black females (ie, large increases in diabetes and hypertension prevalence). Black females also showed the greatest increase in the prevalence of hypertension.


Temporal trends in cardiovascular disease risk factors among white, South Asian, Chinese and black groups in Ontario, Canada, 2001 to 2012: a population-based study.

Chiu M, Maclagan LC, Tu JV, Shah BR - BMJ Open (2015)

Summary of trends in major cardiovascular risk factors among males and females by ethnicity, Ontario, Canada. Data were derived from the Ontario components of Statistics Canada's Canadian Community Health Surveys. Arrows ↑↓ indicate ≥20% increases or decreases in major cardiovascular risk factor prevalences comparing the estimates for 2009-2012 to estimates for 2001-2004. *P<0.05.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4538273&req=5

BMJOPEN2014007232F4: Summary of trends in major cardiovascular risk factors among males and females by ethnicity, Ontario, Canada. Data were derived from the Ontario components of Statistics Canada's Canadian Community Health Surveys. Arrows ↑↓ indicate ≥20% increases or decreases in major cardiovascular risk factor prevalences comparing the estimates for 2009-2012 to estimates for 2001-2004. *P<0.05.
Mentions: Figure 4 summarises the trends in the major cardiovascular disease risk factors among males and females of the different ethnic groups. Trends for which the per cent change was more than 20% are shown—overall, the prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk factors appeared to be worsening the most in South Asian males (ie, large increases in diabetes, hypertension and overweight/obesity prevalence), black males (ie, large increases in diabetes and obesity prevalence) and black females (ie, large increases in diabetes and hypertension prevalence). Black females also showed the greatest increase in the prevalence of hypertension.

Bottom Line: The prevalence of hypertension increased the most among black females.Smoking prevalence decreased by more than 20% among South Asian, Chinese and white females.Awareness of the direction and magnitude of these risk factor trends may be useful in informing targeted strategies for preventing cardiovascular diseases in multiethnic populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus