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Temporal trends in cardiovascular disease risk factors among white, South Asian, Chinese and black groups in Ontario, Canada, 2001 to 2012: a population-based study.

Chiu M, Maclagan LC, Tu JV, Shah BR - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: The prevalence of hypertension increased the most among black females.Smoking prevalence decreased by more than 20% among South Asian, Chinese and white females.Awareness of the direction and magnitude of these risk factor trends may be useful in informing targeted strategies for preventing cardiovascular diseases in multiethnic populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Temporal trends in the prevalence (%) of other cardiovascular risk factors, by ethnicity. Data were derived from the Ontario components of Statistics Canada's Canadian Community Health Surveys. Estimates were age- and sex-standardised to the 2001 Ontario Census population and weighted by the survey sample weight. Percent changes ∆ are reported for 2009-2012 vs. 2001-2004; i.e. [(estimate for 2009-2012 - estimate for 2001-2004) / (estimate for 2001-2004)]*100. Bootstrap methods were used to derive p values comparing estimates for 2009-2012 to estimates for 2001-2004. Definitions: Psychosocial stress ("extremely" or "quite a bit" stressed on most days); inadequate fruit and vegetable intake (< three times per day); inadequate leisure physical activity (≤ 15 min/day); nonregular alcohol consumption (< three drinks per week).
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BMJOPEN2014007232F3: Temporal trends in the prevalence (%) of other cardiovascular risk factors, by ethnicity. Data were derived from the Ontario components of Statistics Canada's Canadian Community Health Surveys. Estimates were age- and sex-standardised to the 2001 Ontario Census population and weighted by the survey sample weight. Percent changes ∆ are reported for 2009-2012 vs. 2001-2004; i.e. [(estimate for 2009-2012 - estimate for 2001-2004) / (estimate for 2001-2004)]*100. Bootstrap methods were used to derive p values comparing estimates for 2009-2012 to estimates for 2001-2004. Definitions: Psychosocial stress ("extremely" or "quite a bit" stressed on most days); inadequate fruit and vegetable intake (< three times per day); inadequate leisure physical activity (≤ 15 min/day); nonregular alcohol consumption (< three drinks per week).

Mentions: Daily leisure physical activity improved modestly in the white and South Asian groups and remained relatively unchanged in the Chinese and black groups (figure 3). A large increase was observed in the proportion of South Asian males who reported eating fruits and vegetables fewer than three times per day (20.9% in 2001–2004 vs 27.5% in 2009–2012, p=0.02; see online supplementary table S2), however, the prevalence in South Asian females remained relatively unchanged over the study period. The prevalence of psychosocial stress declined among males in all ethnic groups, with the largest declines observed among South Asian and Black males (figure 3). A decline in non-regular alcohol consumption was observed in the white group, particularly white females (−9.1%, p<0.0001) and an increase was observed in black males (7.7%, p=0.09), while temporal trends in other ethnic and sex groups were relatively stable.


Temporal trends in cardiovascular disease risk factors among white, South Asian, Chinese and black groups in Ontario, Canada, 2001 to 2012: a population-based study.

Chiu M, Maclagan LC, Tu JV, Shah BR - BMJ Open (2015)

Temporal trends in the prevalence (%) of other cardiovascular risk factors, by ethnicity. Data were derived from the Ontario components of Statistics Canada's Canadian Community Health Surveys. Estimates were age- and sex-standardised to the 2001 Ontario Census population and weighted by the survey sample weight. Percent changes ∆ are reported for 2009-2012 vs. 2001-2004; i.e. [(estimate for 2009-2012 - estimate for 2001-2004) / (estimate for 2001-2004)]*100. Bootstrap methods were used to derive p values comparing estimates for 2009-2012 to estimates for 2001-2004. Definitions: Psychosocial stress ("extremely" or "quite a bit" stressed on most days); inadequate fruit and vegetable intake (< three times per day); inadequate leisure physical activity (≤ 15 min/day); nonregular alcohol consumption (< three drinks per week).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4538273&req=5

BMJOPEN2014007232F3: Temporal trends in the prevalence (%) of other cardiovascular risk factors, by ethnicity. Data were derived from the Ontario components of Statistics Canada's Canadian Community Health Surveys. Estimates were age- and sex-standardised to the 2001 Ontario Census population and weighted by the survey sample weight. Percent changes ∆ are reported for 2009-2012 vs. 2001-2004; i.e. [(estimate for 2009-2012 - estimate for 2001-2004) / (estimate for 2001-2004)]*100. Bootstrap methods were used to derive p values comparing estimates for 2009-2012 to estimates for 2001-2004. Definitions: Psychosocial stress ("extremely" or "quite a bit" stressed on most days); inadequate fruit and vegetable intake (< three times per day); inadequate leisure physical activity (≤ 15 min/day); nonregular alcohol consumption (< three drinks per week).
Mentions: Daily leisure physical activity improved modestly in the white and South Asian groups and remained relatively unchanged in the Chinese and black groups (figure 3). A large increase was observed in the proportion of South Asian males who reported eating fruits and vegetables fewer than three times per day (20.9% in 2001–2004 vs 27.5% in 2009–2012, p=0.02; see online supplementary table S2), however, the prevalence in South Asian females remained relatively unchanged over the study period. The prevalence of psychosocial stress declined among males in all ethnic groups, with the largest declines observed among South Asian and Black males (figure 3). A decline in non-regular alcohol consumption was observed in the white group, particularly white females (−9.1%, p<0.0001) and an increase was observed in black males (7.7%, p=0.09), while temporal trends in other ethnic and sex groups were relatively stable.

Bottom Line: The prevalence of hypertension increased the most among black females.Smoking prevalence decreased by more than 20% among South Asian, Chinese and white females.Awareness of the direction and magnitude of these risk factor trends may be useful in informing targeted strategies for preventing cardiovascular diseases in multiethnic populations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus