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A journey into a Mediterranean diet and type 2 diabetes: a systematic review with meta-analyses.

Esposito K, Maiorino MI, Bellastella G, Chiodini P, Panagiotakos D, Giugliano D - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Dietary patterns that described themselves as using a 'Mediterranean' dietary pattern.The outcomes were glycaemic control, cardiovascular risk factors and remission from the metabolic syndrome.From 2824 studies, 8 meta-analyses and 5 RCTs were eligible.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Diabetes Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Summary of meta-analyses of Mediterranean diet and HbA1c (top panel), total cholesterol (middle panel) and body weight (bottom panel). *This meta-analysis refers to figure 2 (top panel; HbA1c, glycosylated haemoglobin; RCT, randomised controlled trial).
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BMJOPEN2015008222F3: Summary of meta-analyses of Mediterranean diet and HbA1c (top panel), total cholesterol (middle panel) and body weight (bottom panel). *This meta-analysis refers to figure 2 (top panel; HbA1c, glycosylated haemoglobin; RCT, randomised controlled trial).

Mentions: We did a meta-analysis of long-term clinical trials of the Mediterranean diet and glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes (figure 2, top panel). We found three interventional trials,26–28 with four arms, as Elhayany et al27 compared two different Mediterranean diets with the same control diet. The results show an overall effect estimate for HbA1c of −0.47% (95% CI −0.56 to −0.38) favouring the Mediterranean diet, as compared with the usual care26 or a low-fat diet,2728 with no heterogeneity (I2=3.5%). The Egger tests were not calculated due to the small number of included studies. Figure 3 (top panel) shows a summary of the four meta-analyses182021 (+ that reported in figure 2) of the Mediterranean diet and glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes. All the four analyses favour the Mediterranean diet, with a greater HbA1c reduction, ranging from −0.3% to −0.47%, as compared with the control diet. The absence of heterogeneity in the meta-analysis of figure 2 (top panel), as compared with other meta-analyses in figure 3 (top panel), may be related to the strict entry criteria we adopted for selecting RCTs.


A journey into a Mediterranean diet and type 2 diabetes: a systematic review with meta-analyses.

Esposito K, Maiorino MI, Bellastella G, Chiodini P, Panagiotakos D, Giugliano D - BMJ Open (2015)

Summary of meta-analyses of Mediterranean diet and HbA1c (top panel), total cholesterol (middle panel) and body weight (bottom panel). *This meta-analysis refers to figure 2 (top panel; HbA1c, glycosylated haemoglobin; RCT, randomised controlled trial).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4538272&req=5

BMJOPEN2015008222F3: Summary of meta-analyses of Mediterranean diet and HbA1c (top panel), total cholesterol (middle panel) and body weight (bottom panel). *This meta-analysis refers to figure 2 (top panel; HbA1c, glycosylated haemoglobin; RCT, randomised controlled trial).
Mentions: We did a meta-analysis of long-term clinical trials of the Mediterranean diet and glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes (figure 2, top panel). We found three interventional trials,26–28 with four arms, as Elhayany et al27 compared two different Mediterranean diets with the same control diet. The results show an overall effect estimate for HbA1c of −0.47% (95% CI −0.56 to −0.38) favouring the Mediterranean diet, as compared with the usual care26 or a low-fat diet,2728 with no heterogeneity (I2=3.5%). The Egger tests were not calculated due to the small number of included studies. Figure 3 (top panel) shows a summary of the four meta-analyses182021 (+ that reported in figure 2) of the Mediterranean diet and glycaemic control in type 2 diabetes. All the four analyses favour the Mediterranean diet, with a greater HbA1c reduction, ranging from −0.3% to −0.47%, as compared with the control diet. The absence of heterogeneity in the meta-analysis of figure 2 (top panel), as compared with other meta-analyses in figure 3 (top panel), may be related to the strict entry criteria we adopted for selecting RCTs.

Bottom Line: Dietary patterns that described themselves as using a 'Mediterranean' dietary pattern.The outcomes were glycaemic control, cardiovascular risk factors and remission from the metabolic syndrome.From 2824 studies, 8 meta-analyses and 5 RCTs were eligible.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Diabetes Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus