Limits...
Current pain education within undergraduate medical studies across Europe: Advancing the Provision of Pain Education and Learning (APPEAL) study.

Briggs EV, Battelli D, Gordon D, Kopf A, Ribeiro S, Puig MM, Kress HG - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Excluding France, only 22% (47/211 schools) provided a dedicated pain module and in only 9% (18/211) was this compulsory.Overall, the median number of hours spent teaching pain was 12.0 (range 4-56.0 h; IQR: 12.0) for compulsory dedicated pain modules and 9.0 (range 1.0-60.0 h; IQR: 10.5) for other compulsory (non-pain specific) modules.There was substantial international variation throughout.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, King's College London, London, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Methods used by medical schools for: (A) teaching (N=174 schools with available information) and (B) assessment (N=193) of pain medicine education in 15 European countries.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4538268&req=5

BMJOPEN2014006984F2: Methods used by medical schools for: (A) teaching (N=174 schools with available information) and (B) assessment (N=193) of pain medicine education in 15 European countries.

Mentions: Information on methods used in pain teaching were available from 174 (72%) of the 242 schools. Of these, 95% (166/174) used classroom teaching, while 48% (84/174) used placements, and 26% (45/174) used case-based learning (figure 2A; online supplementary appendix table S1). Some schools used only one teaching modality, but most used two or more. Information on assessment methods used were available from 193 (80%) of the 242 schools. These schools mainly assessed pain learning using examinations (179/193; 93%). Almost a quarter (24%) used assignments, while placements, practical assessments, attendance, presentations, group work, clinical methods or problem-based learning was each used by <10% of schools (figure 2B; online supplementary appendix table S1). Schools generally used one to two assessment modalities. While classroom teaching and examinations were widely employed in all countries, variations existed in the usage of other teaching and assessment approaches.


Current pain education within undergraduate medical studies across Europe: Advancing the Provision of Pain Education and Learning (APPEAL) study.

Briggs EV, Battelli D, Gordon D, Kopf A, Ribeiro S, Puig MM, Kress HG - BMJ Open (2015)

Methods used by medical schools for: (A) teaching (N=174 schools with available information) and (B) assessment (N=193) of pain medicine education in 15 European countries.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4538268&req=5

BMJOPEN2014006984F2: Methods used by medical schools for: (A) teaching (N=174 schools with available information) and (B) assessment (N=193) of pain medicine education in 15 European countries.
Mentions: Information on methods used in pain teaching were available from 174 (72%) of the 242 schools. Of these, 95% (166/174) used classroom teaching, while 48% (84/174) used placements, and 26% (45/174) used case-based learning (figure 2A; online supplementary appendix table S1). Some schools used only one teaching modality, but most used two or more. Information on assessment methods used were available from 193 (80%) of the 242 schools. These schools mainly assessed pain learning using examinations (179/193; 93%). Almost a quarter (24%) used assignments, while placements, practical assessments, attendance, presentations, group work, clinical methods or problem-based learning was each used by <10% of schools (figure 2B; online supplementary appendix table S1). Schools generally used one to two assessment modalities. While classroom teaching and examinations were widely employed in all countries, variations existed in the usage of other teaching and assessment approaches.

Bottom Line: Excluding France, only 22% (47/211 schools) provided a dedicated pain module and in only 9% (18/211) was this compulsory.Overall, the median number of hours spent teaching pain was 12.0 (range 4-56.0 h; IQR: 12.0) for compulsory dedicated pain modules and 9.0 (range 1.0-60.0 h; IQR: 10.5) for other compulsory (non-pain specific) modules.There was substantial international variation throughout.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, King's College London, London, UK.

No MeSH data available.